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William Hiley Bathurst

1796 - 1877 Person Name: W. H. Bathurst Author of "Oh, for a faith that will not shrink" in Hymns and Tunes Bathurst, William Hiley , M.A., son of the Rt. Hon. Charles Bragge (afterwards Bathurst) some time M.P. for Bristol, born at Clevedale, near Bristol, Aug. 28, 1796, and educated at Winchester, and Christ Church, Oxford, graduating B.A. in 1818. From 1820 to 1852 he held the Rectory of Barwick-in-Elmet, near Leeds. Resigning the Rectory in the latter year, through his inability to reconcile his doctrinal views with the Book of Common Prayer, he retired into private life, and died at Lydney Park, Gloucestershire, Nov. 25, 1877. His works include, The Georgics of Virgil: Translated by W. H. B., 1849; Metrical Musings; or, Thoughts on Sacred Subjects in Verse, 1849; and Psalms and Hymns for Public and Private Use, 1831 (2nd ed. 1842). This last contains 141 versions of Psalms, and 206 hymns. All the latter, and many of the former are original. Of his hymns, those in most extensive use are, "Hark! the distant isles proclaim," "Holy Spirit from on high,” "Jesus, Thy Church with longing eyes,” "Eternal Spirit, by whose power," "O for a faith that will not shrink” and “O Saviour, may we never rest." In addition to these and a few others (all of which are annotated under their first lines), the following are in common use, but mainly in America:— 1. Before Thy cross, my dying Lord. Faith. 2. Before Thy mercy-seat, O Lord. Holy Scriptures. 3. Behold what unspeakable love. Heaven. 4. Does the Lord of Glory speak? Holy Scripture. 5. Ere the world with light invested. Holy Spirit. 6. Except the Lord our labours bless. Ps. cxxvii. 1. Full of weakness and of sin. The Creator Spirit desired. 8. Glory to the Almighty Father. Praise. 9. Holy Lord, our hearts prepare. Preparation for Prayer. 10. Holy Spirit from on high. Holy Spirit's direction implored. 11. How blest are they who feel the weight. Repentance. 12. How strange that souls whom Jesus feeds. Conflict. 13. How sweet it is in early youth. Youthful Piety. 14. How sweet the hour of closing day. Death. 15. Led by a Father's gentle hand. Communion of Saints 16. Lord, a better heart bestow. Lent. 17. Lord, bid the light arise. To the Holy Spirit. 18. Lord, shed Thy glory as of old. Whitsuntide. 19. Lord, what blessed consolation. Safety of the Church. 20. Lord, when our offerings we present. Offertory. 21. 0 for a beam of heavenly light. Lent. 22. 0 for that flame of living tire. Holy Spirit. 23. 0 give thanks unto the Lord. Ps. cv. 24. Shepherd of Israel, from above. On behalf of Children. 25. This day the Lord hath called His own. Sunday. 26. When the world my heart is rending. Heaven. 27. Why search ye in the narrow tomb? Ascension. 28. Ye servants of the living God. Praise. All these hymns were given in his Psalms & Hymns , &c, 1831 (Preface dated November 15th, 1830), and repeated, without alteration, in the 2nd ed., 1842. They are characterized by simplicity of language, and directness of aim; but do not in any instance rise above the ordinary level of passable hymn-writing. In some American collections Bathurst's name is contracted to "Bath," and this is regarded either as a complete surname or as a Bath Collection. The contraction was given by Bickersteth in his Christian Psalmody, 1833. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =================== Bathurst, William H., p. 117, ii. Additional hymns from his Psalms & Hymns, 1831, are in common use as follows:— 1. Great God, when I approach Thy throne. Redemption. 2. How bright a day was that which saw. The First Sabbath. 3. How frail and fallible I am. Jesus Unchangeable. 4. In Jesus' name with one accord. Divine Worship. 5. Lord, I claim Thee for my own. Ps. lxiii. 6. Lord shew Thy glory as of old. This is not "Lord shed Thy glory, &c," as stated at p. 118, i., 18. 7. Lord, when I lift my voice to Thee. Ps. ci. 8. O Lord, defend us as of old. Ps. lxxiv. 9. O Lord, how long shall heathens hold. Ps. lxxix. 10. 0 Lord, look down with pitying eye. Intercession for the Jews. Begins with st. iv. of “0 how is Zion's glory gone." 11. Praise God, O my soul. Ps. cxlvi. 12. Saviour, at Thy feet we bow. United Prayer. 13. 'Tis past, that agonizing hour. Ascension. 14. The Lord look'd all around. Universal Corruption. 15. To the Source of every blessing. Praise to the Father. 16. What can relieve the troubled soul? Christ the Comforter. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Thomas MacKellar

1812 - 1899 Person Name: Thos. MacKellar Author of "I would I were content to be" in Hymns and Tunes Mackellar, Thomas, was born in New York, Aug. 12, 1812. At the age of 14 he entered the printing establishment of Harper Brothers. In 1833 he removed to Philadelphia and joined the type-foundry firm of Johnson & Smith, as proof reader. He subsequently became a foreman, and then a partner in that firm, which has been known from 1860 as Mackellar, Smiths, and Jordan, type-founders of Philadelphia. His publications include The American Printer, 1866, a prose work, and the following in verse:— (1) Droppings from the Heart, 1844; (2) Tam's Fortnight Ramble, 1847; (3) Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; (4) Rhymes Atween Times, 1872. The last contains some of his hymns. (5) Hymns and a few Metrical Psalms, Phila. 1883 (71 hymns, 3 psalms), 2nd edition, 1887 (84 hymns, 3 psalms). Those of his hymns in common use include :— 1. At the door of mercy sighing. Lent. Published in his Rhymes Atween Times, 1872, as, "Long of restful peace forsaken," and again in Dr. Hitchcock's Hymns & Songs of Praise, 1874, as "At the door of mercy sighing." 2. Bear the burden of the present. Resignation. Written in 1852, and published in his Lines for the Gentle and Loving, 1853; and Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868. Part of this hymn, beginning "All unseen the Master walketh," was in common use in Great Britain. 3. Book of grace, and book of glory. Holy Scripture. Written in 1843. It was given in the Sunday School Union Collection, 1860, and his Hymns and a few M. Psalms, &c, 1883, and a few collections, including Allon's Children's Worship, 1878, &c. 4. Draw nigh to the Holy. Jesus, the soul’s Refuge. In Sumner's Songs of Zion, 1851, and the Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 5 st. of 8 1ines. 5. Father, in my life's young morning. A Child's Prayer. Written in 1841. 6. In the vineyard of our Father. Work for God. Written in 1845. It was given in the Hymns for Church & Home, Philadelphia, I860, and other collections. 7. Jesus! when my soul is parting. Continued presence of Jesus desired. Written in 1848, and included in Lyra Sacra Americana, 1868, in 4 stanzas of 6 lines, and entitled "Jesus first and last." 8. There is a land immortal. Heaven. Mr. Mackellar says that this hymn was written "One evening as a fancy suddenly struck me of a religious nature, I laid aside the work in hand, and pursuing the new idea, I at once produced the hymn, ‘There is a land immortal,' and sent it to the editor [of Neale's Gazette], who referred to it as a religious poem from ‘Tam,' my assumed name, under which I had already acquired considerable notoriety. This was in 1845. It was widely copied, and afterwards inserted in a volume published by me." Duffield's English Hymns, &c, 1886, p. 551. Mr. Mackellar was an Elder of the Presbyterian Church. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ====================== Mackellar, T., p. 708, ii. Additional hymns are:— (1) "I have no hiding-place" (Safety in Jesus), (2) “I will extol Thee every day" (Praise to God). These are dated 1880 and 1871 respectively in Stryker's Church Songs, N. Y., 1889. He died Dec. 29, 1899. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============ Mackellar, T., pp. 708, ii.; 1578, ii. He died Dec. 29, 1899. His hymn, “O the darkness, O the sorrow" (Redemption through Christ), was written in 1886, and added to the latest 1668 editions of his Hymns & Metrical Psalms. It is found in Summa Corda, 1898, and several other collections. His Hymns and Poems were collected and published in 1900. [Rev. L. F. Benson, D.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Henry S. Rupp

1827 - 1898 Person Name: H. S. Rupp Composer of "SAFETY" in Hymns and Tunes Rupp, Henry S. (Near Shiremanstown, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, 1827?--January 14, 1898). Ordained as deacon January 17, 1878 and served the Slate Hill congregation. Additional family history is available in the file on Rupp. --DNAH Archives

Reginald Heber

1783 - 1826 Person Name: Heber Author of "By cool Siloam's shady rill" in Hymns and Tunes Reginald Heber was born in 1783 into a wealthy, educated family. He was a bright youth, translating a Latin classic into English verse by the time he was seven, entering Oxford at 17, and winning two awards for his poetry during his time there. After his graduation he became rector of his father's church in the village of Hodnet near Shrewsbury in the west of England where he remained for 16 years. He was appointed Bishop of Calcutta in 1823 and worked tirelessly for three years until the weather and travel took its toll on his health and he died of a stroke. Most of his 57 hymns, which include "Holy, Holy, Holy," are still in use today. -- Greg Scheer, 1995 ==================== Heber, Reginald, D.D. Born at Malpas, April 21, 1783, educated at Brasenose College, Oxford; Vicar of Hodnet, 1807; Bishop of Calcutta, 1823; died at Trichinopoly, India, April 3, 1826. The gift of versification shewed itself in Heber's childhood; and his Newdigate prize poem Palestine, which was read to Scott at breakfast in his rooms at Brazenose, Oxford, and owed one of its most striking passages to Scott's suggestion, is almost the only prize poem that has won a permanent place in poetical literature. His sixteen years at Hodnet, where he held a halfway position between a parson and a squire, were marked not only by his devoted care of his people, as a parish priest, but by literary work. He was the friend of Milman, Gifford, Southey, and others, in the world of letters, endeared to them by his candour, gentleness, "salient playfulness," as well as learning and culture. He was on the original staff of The Quarterly Review; Bampton Lecturer (1815); and Preacher at Lincoln's Inn (1822). His edition of Jeremy Taylor is still the classic edition. During this portion of his life he had often had a lurking fondness for India, had traced on the map Indian journeys, and had been tempted to wish himself Bishop of Calcutta. When he was forty years old the literary life was closed by his call to the Episcopate. No memory of Indian annals is holier than that of the three years of ceaseless travel, splendid administration, and saintly enthusiasm, of his tenure of the see of Calcutta. He ordained the first Christian native—Christian David. His first visitation ranged through Bengal, Bombay, and Ceylon; and at Delhi and Lucknow he was prostrated with fever. His second visitation took him through the scenes of Schwartz's labours in Madras Presidency to Trichinopoly, where on April 3,1826, he confirmed forty-two persons, and he was deeply moved by the impression of the struggling mission, so much so that “he showed no appearance of bodily exhaus¬tion." On his return from the service ”He retired into his own room, and according to his invariable custom, wrote on the back of the address on Confirmation 'Trichinopoly, April 3, 1826.' This was his last act, for immediately on taking off his clothes, he went into a large cold bath, where he had bathed the two preceding mornings, but which was now the destined agent of his removal to Paradise. Half an hour after, his servant, alarmed at his long absence, entered the room and found him a lifeless corpse." Life, &c, 1830, vol. ii. p. 437. Heber's hymns were all written during the Hodnet period. Even the great missionary hymn, "From Greenland's icy mountains," notwithstanding the Indian allusions ("India's coral strand," "Ceylon's isle"), was written before he received the offer of Calcutta. The touching funeral hymn, "Thou art gone to the grave," was written on the loss of his first babe, which was a deep grief to him. Some of the hymns were published (1811-16) in the Christian Observer, the rest were not published till after his death. They formed part of a ms. collection made for Hodnet (but not published), which contained, besides a few hymns from older and special sources, contributions by Milman. The first idea of the collection appears in a letter in 1809 asking for a copy of the Olney Hymns, which he "admired very much." The plan was to compose hymns connected with the Epistles and Gospels, to be sung after the Nicene Creed. He was the first to publish sermons on the Sunday services (1822), and a writer in The Guardian has pointed out that these efforts of Heber were the germs of the now familiar practice, developed through the Christian Year (perhaps following Ken's Hymns on the Festivals), and by Augustus Hare, of welding together sermon, hymnal, and liturgy. Heber tried to obtain from Archbishop Manners Sutton and the Bishop of London (1820) authorization of his ms. collection of hymns by the Church, enlarging on the "powerful engine" which hymns were among Dissenters, and the irregular use of them in the church, which it was impossible to suppress, and better to regulate. The authorization was not granted. The lyric spirit of Scott and Byron passed into our hymns in Heber's verse; imparting a fuller rhythm to the older measures, as illustrated by "Oh, Saviour, is Thy promise fled," or the martial hymn, "The Son of God goes forth to war;" pressing into sacred service the freer rhythms of contemporary poetry (e.g. "Brightest and best of the sons of the morning"; "God that madest earth and heaven"); and aiming at consistent grace of literary expression.. Their beauties and faults spring from this modern spirit. They have not the scriptural strength of our best early hymns, nor the dogmatic force of the best Latin ones. They are too flowing and florid, and the conditions of hymn composition are not sufficiently understood. But as pure and graceful devotional poetry, always true and reverent, they are an unfailing pleasure. The finest of them is that majestic anthem, founded on the rhythm of the English Bible, "Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord God Almighty." The greatest evidence of Heber's popularity as a hymnwriter, and his refined taste as a compiler, is found in the fact that the total contents of his ms. collection which were given in his posthumous Hymns written and adapted to the Weekly Church Service of the Year. London, J. Murray, 1827; which included 57 hymns by Heber, 12 by Milman, and 29 by other writers, are in common in Great Britain and America at the present time. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] Of Bishop Heber's hymns, about one half are annotated under their respective first lines. Those given below were published in Heber's posthumous Hymns, &c, 1827. Some of them are in extensive use in Great Britain and America; but as they possess no special histories they are grouped together as from the Hymns, &c, 1827:— 1. Beneath our feet, and o'er our head. Burial. 2. Creator of the rolling flood. St. Peter's Day, or, Gospel for 6th Sunday after Trinity. 3. Lo, the lilies of the field. Teachings of Nature: or, Gospel for 15th Sunday after Trinity. 4. 0 God, by Whom the seed is given. Sexagesima. 6. 0 God, my sins are manifold. Forgiveness, or, Gospel for 22nd S. after Trinity. 6. 0 hand of bounty, largely spread. Water into Wine, or, Gospel for 2nd S. after Epiphany. 7. 0 King of earth, and air, and sea. Feeding the Multitude; or, Gospel for 4th S. in Lent. 8. 0 more than merciful, Whose bounty gave. Good Friday. 9. 0 most merciful! 0 most bountiful. Introit Holy Communion. 10. 0 Thou, Whom neither time nor space. God unsearchable, or, Gospel for 5th Sunday in Lent. 11. 0 weep not o'er thy children's tomb. Innocents Day. 12. Room for the proud! Ye sons of clay. Dives and Lazarus, or, Gospel for 1st Sunday after Trinity. 13. Sit thou on my right hand, my Son, saith the Lord. Ascension. 14. Spirit of truth, on this thy day. Whit-Sunday. 15. The feeble pulse, the gasping breath. Burial, or, Gospel for 1st S. after Trinity. 16. The God of glory walks His round. Septuagesima, or, the Labourers in the Marketplace. 17. The sound of war in earth and air. Wrestling against Principalities and Powers, or, Epistle for 2lst Sunday after Trinity. 18. The world is grown old, her pleasures are past. Advent; or, Epistle for 4th Sunday in Advent. 19. There was joy in heaven. The Lost Sheep; or, Gospel for 3rd S. after Trinity. 20. Though sorrows rise and dangers roll. St. James's Day. 21. To conquer and to save, the Son of God. Christ the Conqueror. 22. Virgin-born, we bow before Thee. The Virgin Mary. Blessed amongst women, or, Gospel for 3rd S. in Lent. 23. Wake not, 0 mother, sounds of lamentation. Raising the Widow's Son, or, Gospel for 16th S. after Trinity. 24. When on her Maker's bosom. Holy Matrimony, or, Gospel for 2nd S. after Epiphany. 25. When through the torn sail the wild tempest is streaming. Stilling the Sea, or, Gospel for 4th Sunday after Epiphany. 26. Who yonder on the desert heath. The Good Samaritan, or, Gospel for 13th Sunday after Trinity. This list is a good index of the subjects treated of in those of Heber's hymns which are given under their first lines, and shows that he used the Gospels far more than the Epistles in his work. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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