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Jean Sibelius

1865 - 1957 Hymnal Number: 478 Composer of "FINLANDIA" in The Cyber Hymnal Johann Julius Christian [Jean] Sibelius DM Finland 1865-1957. Born at Hameenlinna, Finland, the son of a Swedish-speaking medical doctor, he lost his father to typhoid in 1868, leaving the family in substantial debt. His mother, again pregnant, had to sell their property and move in with her widowed mother. His aunt Julia gave him piano lessons when he was seven on the family upright piano, wrapping him on the knuckles when he played a wrong note. He learned to improvise as he played. His uncle, Pehr Ferdinand Sibelius, was interested in music, especially the violin, and gave Jean a violin when he was 10. As his musical advisor his uncle encouraged him to play and compose music. He played music with sister on piano, brother on cello, and himself on violin. He attended a Finnish-speaking prep school in 1874 and continued his education at the Hameenlinna Normal Lyceum thereafter. Jean also showed a strong interest in nature, frequently walking around the countryside when the family moved to the Loviisa coast for the summer months. In 1881 he took violin lessons from the local bandmaster, and developed a strong interest in violin. He became an accomplished player, and thought of becoming a virtuoso, but realizing he began study too late in life for that, instead opted to compose. He often played music in quartets with neighboring families, adding to his chamber music experience. He took the French form of his name, Jean. He studied law at the Imperial Alexander University in Finland, but showed far more interest in music. He then studied music at the Helsinki Music Institute (now Sibelius Academy) from 1885-1889. The school’s founder, Martin Wegelius, did much to support education development in Finland and gave Sibelius his first lessons in composition. Another teacher,,Ferruccio Busoni, a pianist-composer, helped him as well and became a life-long friend. Other friends, pianist Adolf Paul, and conductor-to-be, Armas Jarnefelt, also helped him. In 1892 he married Armas ‘s sister, Aino Jarnefelt, daughter of General Alexander Jarnefelt, governor of Vaasa. They had six daughters, Eva, Ruth, Kirsti, Katarina, Margareta, and Heidi. He continued his musical studies in Berlin (1889-1890) with Albert Becker, and in Vienna (1890-1891) with Robert Fuchs and Karl Goldmark. In Berlin he had opportunity to attend concerts and operas. In Vienna he turned to orchestral composition and had much success, although he had gallstone surgery during that period. He also traveled to the UK, France, Germany, and the USA during this time in his life, composing, conducting, and socializing. In 1892 he took on teaching assignments at the Music Institute and at Kajanus’s conducting school, but this left him with little time for composing. Sibelius’ works were more and more appreciated in Helsinki concert halls as he composed and conducted symphonies in the mid-1890s. In 1898 he was awarded a substantial grant, initially for 10 years, and later extended for life, allowing him to concentrate on composition. Much of his music became popular in Finland and in Germany. In 1899 he began work on his first symphony. It went well, but other patriotic music hehad composed did even better, since Russia was trying to restrict the powers of the Grand Duchy of Finland. In 1900 Sibelius went on an international tour with Kajanus and his orchestra, presenting his recent works. In 1901 he wrote his second symphony, which received rave reviews. He continued to compose as he became popular and well-known. In 1903 he had a new home built near Lake Tuusula north of Helsinki, calleed Ainola (after his wife). He gave concerts in and around Finland, spending more and more time away from home, to the chagrin of his wife. After a time he returned home and composed from there. He spent much time wining and dining in Helsinki, and it had a disastrous effect on his wife, who finally entered a sanitorium. He resolved again to give up drinking and concentrate on composing his 3rd symphony. He met Gustav Mahler in Helsinki and they became friends. He performed his 3rd symphony in St Petersburg, Russia. In 1907 he underwent a serious operation for suspected throat cancer, and spent time in the hospital in 1908. His smoking and drinking had now become life-threatening. He cancelled concerts for Rome, Warsaw, and Berlin, but kept one in London. His health deteriorated further, And his brush with death inspired him to compose his 4th symphony. In 1909 his successful throat operation resulted in renewed happiness for him and his wife, Aino. He continued conducting concerts, and met Claude Debussy, who further encouraged his musical efforts. He began working on his 4th symphony in 1910, but had to write other music to compensate for dwindling funds. He finished his 4th symphony in Berlin and conducted concerts in Sweden in 1911. In 1912 he completed short orchestral works. Over the next several years he continued producing a variety of pieces of music, well-received, especially in America. He was given an honorary DM degree from Yale University and also another from the University of Helsinki about the same time. WW1 interrupted his music royalties in 1915, and he was forced to compose smaller works for publication to make ends meet. He completed his 5th symphony at age 50, but he was dissatisfied with it and reworked it three times In 1917 he starting drinking again, triggering arguments with his wife. The Russian Revolution in 1917 caused an improvement in their personal relationship, and he wrote his ‘Jager March’ to celebrate Finnish independence from Russia. The next year the Finnish Civil War began, putting a damper on his march. In 1919, after the war, he completed his 6th symphony. In 1920 George Eastman , of Eastman Kodak, asked him to teach for a year in New York, but he declined. He did enjoy a trip conducting several concerts in England in 1921. He premiered his 6th symphony in 1923. In 1924 he completed his 7th symphony. The next year he composed a number of small pieces. He began drinking again. He did write a few more major works, but for the last thirty years of his life he avoided publicly talking about his music. He tried to write an 8th symphony, but was unsatisfied with it and burned the scores. In fact, he burned a laundry basket full of music he had written, to the chagrin of his wife. But, afterward, he became calmer and gradually had a lighter mood. In 1935 he was awarded the Goethe-Metal, with a certificate signed by Adolf Hitler. A Soviet invasion of Finland in 1939 was repelled, but Finland gave up territory to Russia as a result. In 1941 Sibelius and his wife returned to their Finland home, Ainola, after a long absence. He did not compose much the last few years, and died at Ainola. His wife outlived him by 12 years. John Perry

Ina Duley Ogdon

1872 - 1964 Hymnal Number: 628 Author of "Brighten the Corner Where You Are" in The Cyber Hymnal Ogdon, Ina Duley. (Rossville, Illinois, 1872--May 18, 1964, Toledo, Ohio). Disciples of Christ. Granddaughter of a Methodist minister, she was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William W. Duley. Married James Ogdon. She wrote: "My father went with my mother to her church after his marriage to her, so I was brought up in the church of the Disciples of Christ." She wrote over three thousand hymns, anthems, cantatas, and miscellaneous verse. Her hymns include "Brighten the corner where you are," 1912; "Carry your cross with a smile," 1916; "My Lord abides;" "When you know Jesus too;" "Tell Jesus;" "Lighten the burden for someone;" "I have been saved," Her first hymn was "Open wide the window." Composer Charles Gabriel wrote, "Loved by thousands who have sung her hymns, she shrinks from celebrity in the knowledge that her songs are God-given and that without Him she could do nothing." See: Beattie, David J. (1931). The Romance of Sacred Song. London: Marshall, Morgan and Scott, Ltd. The Presbyterian Survey November 1952. The Toledo Blade, 19 May 1964. --Ernest K. Emurian, DNAH Archives Photo from Joseph Gardner collection from website "Ina Duly Ogdon Home" by Melissa Archibald (http://www.freewebs.com/marchi/inaphotosarticles.htm)

Theodulf, Bishop of Orléans

750 - 821 Person Name: Theodulph of Orleans Hymnal Number: 58 Author of "All Glory, Laud and Honor" in The Cyber Hymnal Theodulph of Orleans appears to have been a native of Italy. He was brought to France by Charles the Great, perhaps when Charles returned from Italy in 781. He became Bishop of Orleans about 785, and soon afterwards also Abbot of Fleury. After the death of Charles he continued for some time on friendly terms with the Emperor Louis, but, falling under suspicion of being concerned in the plot in favour of Bernard of Italy, was imprisoned in 818, at Angers, where he seems to have died in 821, apparently on Sep. 18. There is a full and interesting sketch of his life and works in the Dictionary of Chr. Biog., iii., pp. 983-989. See also Potthast's Biblical History, Medii Aevi, 1896, vol. ii., p. 1058. The best and most recent edition of his Carmina is in vol. i., Berlin, 1881, of the Poetae Latini Aevi Carolini, which includes his famous "Gloria, laus et honor," p. 426, i. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Edward Hopper

1816 - 1888 Hymnal Number: 3434 Author of "Jesus, Savior, Pilot Me" in The Cyber Hymnal Rv Edward Hopper DD USA 1816-1888. Born at New York City, the son of a merchant, he graduated from Union Theological Seminary, New York. He married Margaretta Wheeler. He was an author and poet and wrote several books. He pastored the Greenville Presbyterian Church, Sag Harbor Presbyterian Church on Long Island, and the Church of Sea and Land, NYC, a church for sailors, where he remained the rest of his life (for years the church building was shared with the First Chinese Presbyterian Church). Once he was asked to compose a hymn verse for the anniversary of the Seamen’s Friend’s Society meeting. Instead, he brought the verse for a hymn he had written eight years before (noted below). John Edgar Gould saw Hopper’s poem (6 stanzas) and composed a tune for it. Hopper died of a heart attack while writing a poem about heaven at his desk. John Perry =============== Hopper, Edward, D.D., was born in 1818, and graduated at Union Theological Seminary, New York, 1842. He is pastor of the Church of Sea and Land, N. Y. He is the author of 1. Jesus, Saviour, pilot me [us]. Jesus the Pilot. 2. They pray the best who pray and watch. Watching & Prayer. 3. Wrecked and struggling in mid-ocean. Wreck & Rescue. Of these No. 1 appeared in the Baptist Praise Book, 1871, and 2 & 3 in Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y., 1874. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology ======================= See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Edmond Budry

1854 - 1932 Person Name: Edmond L. Budry Hymnal Number: 6635 Author of "Thine Is the Glory" in The Cyber Hymnal

Francis Pott

1832 - 1909 Hymnal Number: 187 Author of "Angel Voices, Ever Singing" in The Cyber Hymnal Francis Pott studied at Brasenose College, Oxford, where he graduated B.A. in 1854, and M.A. in 1857. He was ordained Deacon in 1856, and Priest in 1857. He was Curate of Bishopsworth, Bristol, 1856; of Ardingley, Sussex, 1858; was appointed to Ticehurst in 1861; and is now incumbent of Northill, Bedfordshire. Mr. Pott has made many acceptable translations, and has edited "Hymns Fitted to the Order of Common Prayer, etc.;" a compilation of real merit. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ============ Pott, Francis, M.A., was born Dec. 29, 1832, and educated at Brasenose, College, Oxford, B.A. 1854; M.A. 1857. Taking Holy Orders in 1856 he was curate of Bishopsworth, Gloucestershire, 1856-8; Ardingly, Berks, 1858-61; Ticehurst, Sussex, 1861-66; and Rector of Norhill, Ely, 1866. His Hymns fitted to the Order of Common Prayer, and Administration of the Sacraments, and other Rites and Ceremonies of the Church, According to the Use of the Church of England, To which are added Hymns for Certain Local Festivals, was published in 1861, and reprinted from time to time with a few additions. Mr. Pott contributed translations from the Latin and Syriac, and original hymns, including “Angel voices ever singing" (p. 68, ii.), and "Lift up your heads, eternal gates" (Ascension). These original hymns, together with his translations, have been received with much favour and are widely used. In several.…works, several translations from the Latin, and other hymnological work, are attributed to Archdeacon Alfred Pott. We are authorized to state that this ascription of authorship is an error. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Henry Hart Milman

1791 - 1868 Person Name: Henry H. Milman Hymnal Number: 4996 Author of "O Help Us Lord, Each Hour of Need" in The Cyber Hymnal Milman, Henry Hart, D.D., the youngest son of Sir Francis Milman (who received his Baronetage as an eminent Court physician), was born Feb. 10th, 1791, and educated at Dr. Burney's at Greenwich, and subsequently at Eton. His career at B. N. C. Oxford, was brilliant. He took a first class in classics, and carried off the Newdigate, Latin Verse, Latin Essay, and English Essay. His Newdigate on the Apollo Belvedere, 1812, is styled by Dean Stanley "the most perfect of Oxford prize poems." His literary career for several years promised to be poetical. His tragedy Fazio was played at Covent Garden, Miss O'Neill acting Bianca. Samor was written in the year of his appointment to St. Mary's, Reading (1817); The Fall of Jerusalem (1820); Belshazzar and The Martyr of Antioch (1822), and Anne Boleyn, gained a brilliant reception from the reviewers and the public. He was appointed Poetry Professor at Oxford in 1821, and was succeeded ten years after by Keble. It must have been before 1823, the date of Heber's consecration to Calcutta, that the 13 hymns he contributed to Heber's Hymns were composed. But his poetry was only the prelude to his larger work. The Bampton Lectures (1827) mark his transition to theological study, and the future direction of it was permanently fixed by his History of the Jews (1829). This book raised a storm of obloquy. It was denounced from the University pulpit, and in the British Critic. "It was the first decisive inroad of German theology into England, the first palpable indication that the Bible could be studied like another book, that the characters and events of the sacred history could be treated at once critically and reverently" (Dean Stanley). In 1835 he was presented by Sir Robert Peel to a Canonry at Westminster and the Rectory of St. Margaret's. In 1839 appeared his valuable edition of Gibbon's Decline and Fall; and in 1840 his History of Christianity to the Abolition of Paganism in the Roman Empire. Among his minor works in a different field were his Life of Keats and his edition and Life of Horace. It was not till 1854 that his greatest work—-for "vast and varied learning, indefatigable industry, calm impartiality, and subtle and acute criticism, among the most memorable in our language" (Quart Rev.)—-Latin Christianity—-appeared. He had been appointed Dean of St. Paul's in 1849. The great services under the dome originated in his tenure of the Deanery. His latest work, published after his death, Sept. 24, 1868, was The Annals of St. Paul’s. Though one of the most illustrious in the school of English liberal theology, he had no sympathy with the extreme speculations of Germany. The "criticism" of Tübingen "will rarely bear criticism." He "should like an Ewald to criticise Ewald." "Christianity will survive the criticism of Dr. Strauss," and the "bright flashing artillery" of Rénan. His historical style has been compared to Gibbon in its use of epigram and antithesis. His narrative is full of rapidity of movement. His long complex paragraphs have often a splendour of imagination as well as wealth of thought. All the varied powers of his mind found vent in his conversation; he was called, after his death, "the last of the great converters." The catalogue of his friends from the days of Heber, "his early friend," to those of Hallam, Macaulay, and Dean Stanley, was long and distinguished. Milman's 13 hymns were published in Heber's posthumous Hymns in 1827, and subsequently in his own Selection of Psalms & Hymns, 1837. The fine hymn for The Burial of the Dead, in Thring's Collection, "Brother, thou art gone before us," is from The Martyr of Antioch (1822). Like Heber's, they aim at higher literary expression and lyric grace. He makes free use of refrains. The structure is often excellent. His style is less florid and fuller of burning, sometimes lurid force than Heber's. His hymn for the 16th Sunday after Trinity, "When our heads are bowed with woe," has no peer in its presentation of Christ's human sympathy; the hymn for the 2nd Sunday in Lent, “Oh! help us, Lord! each hour of need," is a piece of pure deep devotion. "Ride on, ride on in majesty," the hymn for Palm Sunday, is one of our best hymns. And the stanzas for Good Friday, "Bound upon the accursed tree," form one of the finest meditations on the Passion. All his hymns are still in common use. [Rev.H.Leigh Bennett, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Johann Franck

1618 - 1677 Hymnal Number: 1201 Author of "Deck Thyself, My Soul, with Gladness" in The Cyber Hymnal Johann Franck (b. Guben, Brandenburg, Germany, 1618; d. Guben, 1677) was a law student at the University of Köningsberg and practiced law during the Thirty Years' War. He held several positions in civil service, including councillor and mayor of Guben. A significant poet, second only to Paul Gerhardt in his day, Franck wrote some 110 hymns, many of which were published by his friend Johann Crüger in various editions of the Praxis Pietatis melica. All were included in the first part of Franck’s Teutsche Gedichte bestehend im geistliche Sion (1672). Bert Polman ============= Franck, Johann, son of Johann Franck, advocate and councillor at Guben, Brandenburg, was born at Guben, June 1, 1618. After his father's death, in 1620, his uncle by marriage, the Town Judge, Adam Tielckau, adopted him and sent him for his education to the schools at Guben, Cottbus, Stettin and Thorn. On June 28, 1638, he matriculated as a student of law at the University of Königsberg, the only German university left undisturbed by the Thirty Years' War. Here his religious spirit, his love of nature, and his friendship with such men as Simon Dach and Heinrich Held, preserved him from sharing in the excesses of his fellow students. He returned to Guben at Easter, 1640, at the urgent request of his mother, who wished to have him near her in those times of war during which Guben frequently suffered from the presence of both Swedish and Saxon troops. After his return from Prague, May, 1645, he commenced practice as a lawyer. In 1648 he became a burgess and councillor, in 1661 burgomaster, and in 1671 was appointed the deputy from Guben to the Landtag (Diet) of Lower Lusatia. He died at Guben, June 18, 1677; and on the bicentenary of his death, June 18, 1877, a monumental tablet to his memory was affixed to the outer wall of the Stadtkirche at Guben (Koch, iii. 378-385; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, vii. 211-212; the two works by Dr. Hugo Jentsch of Guben, Johann Franck, 1877, and Die Abfassungszeit der geistlichen Lieder Johann Franck's, 1876). Of Franck's secular poems those before 1649 are much the best; his later productions becoming more and more affected and artificial, long-winded and full of classical allusions, and much inferior to those of Dach or Opitz. As a hymn writer he holds a high rank and is distinguished for unfeigned and firm faith, deep earnestness, finished form, and noble, pithy, simplicity of expression. In his hymns we miss the objectivity and congregational character of the older German hymns, and notice a more personal, individual tone; especially the longing for the inward and mystical union of Christ with the soul as in his "Jesus, meine Freude." He stands in close relationship with Gerhardt, sometimes more soaring and occasionally more profound, but neither on the whole so natural nor so suited for popular comprehension or Church use. His hymns appeared mostly in the works of his friends Weichmann, Crüger and Peter. They were collected in his Geistliches Sion, Guben, 1674, to the number of 110; and of these the 57 hymns (the other 53 being psalm versions of no great merit) were reprinted with a biographical preface by Dr. J. L. Pasig as Johann Franck's Geistliche Lieder, Grimma, 1846. Two of those translated into English are from the Latin of J. Campanus (q. v.). Four other hymns are annotated under their own first lines:—"Brunquell aller Güter"; "Dreieinigkeit der Gottheit wahrer Spiegel"; "Jesu, meine Freude"; "Schmücke dich, o liebe Secle." The rest are:— i. Hymns in English common use: -- i. Erweitert eure Pforten . [Advent]. Founded on Psalm xxiv. 7-10. First published in C. Peter's Andachts-Zymbeln, Freiberg, 1655, p. 25, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines; repeated 1674, p. 3, and 1846, p. 3, as above. Included in the 1688 and later editions of Crüger's Praxis pietatis, in Bollhagen's Gesang-Buch, 1736, &c. The only translation in common use is:—- Unfold your gates and open, a translation of st. 1, 3, 6, by A. T. Russell, as No. 30 in his Hymns & Psalms, 1851; repeated altered as No. 30 in Kennedy, 1863, and thus as No. 102 in Holy Song, 1869. ii. Herr Gott dich loben wir, Regier. Thanksgiving for Peace. Evidently written as a thanksgiving for the conclusion of the Thirty Years' War, by the Peace of Westphalia, Oct. 24, 1648. First published in the Crüger-Runge Gesang-Buch, Berlin, 1653, No. 306, in 9 st. of 8 l., as the first of the "Hymns of Thanksgiving for Peace attained"; and repeated 1674, p. 182, and 1846, p. 77, as above. Included in Crüger's Praxis, 1653, and many later collections, and, as No. 591, in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851. The only translation in common use is:— Lord God, we worship Thee, a very good version of st. 2, 3, 6, 8, by Miss Winkworth in her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 183. Repeated in full in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871; the Hymnary, 1872; the Psalmist, 1878; and in America in the Pennsylvania Lutheran Church Book, 1868. In the American Protestant Episcopal Collection, 1871; the Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y. 1874; and the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880, the translation of stanza 8 is omitted. iii. Herr ich habe missgehandelt. Lent. Of this fine hymn of penitence stanza i. appeared as No. 19 in Cruger's Geistliche Kirchenmelodien , Leipzig, 1649. The full form in 8 stanzas of 6 lines is No. 41 in the Crüger-Runge Gesang-Buch, Berlin, 1653, entitled "For the forgiveness of sins," repeated 1674, p. 39, and 1846, p. 37, as above. Included in Crüger's Praxis, 1653, and others, and in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851. The only translation in common use is:— Lord, to Thee I make confession, a very good translation, omitting st. 4, 5, 6, by Miss Winkworth in her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 44, repeated in the Appendix to the Hymnal for St. John's, Aberdeen, 1865-1870; and in the Pennsylvania Lutheran Ch. Book, 1868; Evangelical Hymnal, N. Y., 1880; Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. Another translation is: "Lord, how oft I have offended," by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 177. iv. Herr Jesu, Licht der Heiden. Presentation in the Temple. Founded on the account in St. Luke ii., and probably the finest hymn on the subject. Dr. Jentsch, 1876, p. 9, thinks it was written before Dec. 8, 1669, as C. Peter, who died then, left a melody for it. We have not found the full text earlier than 1674, as above, p. 10, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines, entitled "On the Festival of the Purification of Mary" (1846, p. 10). Included in the 1688 and later editions of Crüger's Praxis, and in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 197. The translations in common use are:— 1. Light of the Gentile world , a translation, omitting st. 6, by Miss Winkworth in the first service of her Lyra Germanica, 1855, p. 193 (ed. 1876, p. 195), and thence as No. 147 in the Pennsylvania Lutheran Hymn Book, 1865. This version is in S.M. Double. 2. Light of the Gentile Nations, a good translation, omitting st. 6, by Miss Winkworth in her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 80. Repeated in Dr. Thomas's Augustine Hymn Book, 1866, and in America in the Pennsylvania Lutheran Church Book, 1868, and the Ohio Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. ii. Hymns not in English common use: v. Du geballtes Weltgebäude. Christ above all earthly things. Stanza i. in Cruger's Kirchenmelodien, 1649, No. 116. The full text (beginning "Du o schönes) is No. 239 in the Crüger-Runge Gesang-Buch, 1653, in 8 stanzas, entitled "Longing after Eternal Life." Repeated, 1674, p. 194, and 1846, p. 60, as above. The translations are: (1) "Let who will in thee rejoice," by Miss Winkworth, 1855, p. 180 (1876, p. 182). (2) "O beautiful abode of earth," by Miss Warner, 1858 (1861, p. 233). (3) "Thou, O fair Creation-building," by N. L. Frothingham, 1870, p. 232. vi. Unsre müden Augenlieder. Evening. Probably written while a student at Königsberg. First published in J. Weichmann's Sorgen-lägerin, Königsberg, 1648, Pt. iii., No. 4, in 7 st.; repeated 1674, p. 213, and 1846, p. 91, as above. The only translation is by H. J. Buckoll, 1842, p. 79, beginning with st. vi., "Ever, Lord, on Thee relying." [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Dorothy A. Thrupp

1779 - 1847 Person Name: Dorothy Thrupp Hymnal Number: 6155 Author (attributed to) of "Savior, Like a Shepherd Lead Us" in The Cyber Hymnal Dorothy Ann Thrupp was born in London, June 10, 1779. She contributed some hymns, under the pseudonym of "Iota," to W. Carus Wilson's Friendly Visitor and his Children's Friend. Other hymns by her, signed "D.A.T.," appeared in Mrs. Herbert Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the Use of Infant Schools and Nurseries, 1838. She was also the editor of Hymns for the Young, c. 1830, in which all the hymns were given anonymously. She died in London on December 15, 1847. --The Hymnal 1940 Companion ================================ Thrupp, Dorothy Ann, daughter of Joseph Thrupp, of Paddington Green, was born at London, June 20, 1779 and died there on Dec. 14, 1847. Her hymns, a few of which have come into extensive use, were contributed to the Rev. W. Carus Wilson's Friendly Visitor and his Children's Friend, under the nom de plume of Iota; to Mrs. Herbert Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the use of Infant Schools and Nurseries, 1838 (3rd ed. 1846, with change of title to A Sel. . . . of Infant and Juvenile Schools and Families), in which her signature is "D.A.T."; and also to the Hymns for the Young, which she herself edited for the Religious Tract Society circa 1830, 4th ed., 1836. In 1836 and 1837 she also published Thoughts for the Day (2nd series), in which she embodied many hymns which previously appeared in the Friendly Visitor. In addition to her hymns, which are annotated under their respective first lines there are also in common use:— 1. Come, Holy Spirit, come, 0 hear an infant's prayer. Child's Prayer. Appeared in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry, 1838, No. 14, and signed "D.A.T." 2. God loves the little child that prays. God's love for Children. Given in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836; and again in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry&c, 2nd ed., 1840, and signed " D.A.T." It is sometimes given as "God loves the child that humbly prays." 3. Have you read the wondrous story? Life and Death of Jesus. This appeared anonymously in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, R. T. S., 1830, No. 12, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In Miss Thrupp's later publications this hymn is omitted, a fact which suggests that it was not her composition, but possibly that of a friend. It is in theLeeds Sunday School Union Hymn Book, 1833-78. 4. Let us sing with one accord. Praise of Jesus. This hymn is usually associated with Miss Thrupp's name, but on insufficient evidence. We find it in the 4th edition of her Hymns for the Young, 1836, and again in the 3rd ed. of Mrs. H. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the Use of Infant and Juvenile Schools, &c, 1846, and in both instances without signature. We know of no evidence which justifies us in ascribing the authorship with certainty to Miss Thrupp. The hymn is in the Leeds S. S. Union Hymn Book, 1833-78, and several others. 5. Poor and needy though I be. Divine Providence. Appeared in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, No. 22; and again in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry>, &c, 2nd ed., 1840, and signed "D.A.T." 6. See, my child, the mighty ocean. Love of God compared to the Sea. Given in the R. T. S.'s Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, No. 26, and in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry, &c, 1st ed., 1838, and signed "D.A. T." In Kennedy, 1863, it begins "Have you seen the mighty ocean." 7. Thou Guardian of my earliest days. Jesus the Children's Friend. This hymn we have traced to her Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836. It is sometimes given as “Thou Guardian of our earliest days." 8. What a strange and wondrous story. Life and Death of Jesus. This hymn is found without signature in her Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, and again in Mrs. H. Mayo's Selection of Hys. and Poetry, 1838, No. 173, in 4 st. of 4 1, We have found no authority for ascribing it to Miss Thrupp. 9. What led the Son of God? Love of God in Christ. This appeared anonymously in her Hymns for the Young, 1830, and again in the Leeds S. S. Union Hymn Book, 1833. In modern collections it is attributed to Miss Thrupp, on the ground that it is found in the Hys. for the Young, which she edited. 10. Who are they in heaven who stand? All Saints. Published in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hys. and Poetry, 3rd ed., 1846, No. 64, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and signed A. D.T." It is in the Prim. Methodist Sunday School Hymn Book, 1879, and others. Several additional hymns to those named above have also been attributed to Miss Thrupp on insufficient authority. This has probably arisen out of the fact that all the hymns in the Hymns for the Young, including her own, were given anonymously. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

William Gardiner

1770 - 1853 Hymnal Number: 704 Composer of "BELMONT" in The Cyber Hymnal William Gardiner (b. Leicester, England, 1770; d. Leicester, 1853) The son of an English hosiery manufacturer, Gardiner took up his father's trade in addition to writing about music, composing, and editing. Having met Joseph Haydn and Ludwig van Beethoven on his business travels, Gardiner then proceeded to help popularize their compositions, especially Beethoven's, in England. He recorded his memories of various musicians in Music and Friends (3 volumes, 1838-1853). In the first two volumes of Sacred Melodies (1812, 1815), Gardiner turned melodies from composers such as Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven into hymn tunes in an attempt to rejuvenate the singing of psalms. His work became an important model for American editors like Lowell Mason (see Mason's Boston Handel and Haydn Collection, 1822), and later hymnbook editors often turned to Gardiner as a source of tunes derived from classical music. Bert Polman

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