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How Good Is the God We Adore

Representative Text

1 How good is the God we adore!
Our faithful, unchangeable friend:
his love is as great as his pow'r
and knows neither knows measure nor end.

2 For Christ is the first and the last;
his Spirit will guide us safe home;
we'll praise him for all that is past
and trust him for all that's to come.

Source: Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #293

Author: J. Hart

Hart, Joseph, was born in London in 1712. His early life is involved in obscurity. His education was fairly good; and from the testimony of his brother-in-law, and successor in the ministry in Jewin Street, the Rev. John Hughes, "his civil calling was" for some time "that of a teacher of the learned languages." His early life, according to his own Experience which he prefaced to his Hymns, was a curious mixture of loose conduct, serious conviction of sin, and endeavours after amendment of life, and not until Whitsuntide, 1757, did he realize a permanent change, which was brought about mainly through his attending divine service at the Moravian Chapel, in Fetter Lane, London, and hearing a sermon on Rev. iii. 10. During the next two years ma… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: This God is the God we adore
Title: How Good Is the God We Adore
Author: J. Hart
Meter: 8.8.8.8
Language: English
Notes: Doxology from Hart's 'No prophet, nor dreamer of dreams.'
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

CELESTE (Lancashire Sunday School Songs)


CONTRAST (German)

The tune most commonly known as CONTRAST is a German folk tune. In American shape-note tradition the tune is known as GREEN FIELDS or GREENFIELDS. J. S. Bach quoted it in his "Peasant Cantata," but he did not compose it. It has also been misattributed to Maria DeFleury and to Lewis Edson. Edson wrot…

Go to tune page >


Timeline

Media

The Cyber Hymnal #5506
  • Adobe Acrobat image (PDF)
  • Noteworthy Composer score (NWC)
  • XML score (XML)

Instances

Instances (1 - 18 of 18)

An Nou Chanté! #4

Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. and Enl.) #318

Church Family Worship #84

Page Scan

Common Praise #464

TextPage Scan

Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New #293

Page Scan

Complete Mission Praise #244

Hymns and Psalms #277a

Hymns and Psalms #277b

TextPage Scan

Hymns for Today's Church (2nd ed.) #450

Hymns of the Saints #481

Hymns Old and New #217

Sing Glory #41

Singing the Faith #67

TextScoreAudio

The Cyber Hymnal #5506

The Dulcimer Hymn Book #53

Text

The Song Book of the Salvation Army #962

Text

Together in Song #220a

Text

Together in Song #220b

Include 245 pre-1979 instances
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