How Lovely Shines the Morning Star

Representative Text

1 How lovely shines the Morning Star!
The nations see and hail afar
the light in Judah shining.
O David's son of Jacob's race,
my Bridegroom and my King of grace,
for you my heart is pining.
Lowly, holy,
great and glorious,
O victorious
Prince of graces,
filling all the heav'nly places.

2 O highest joy by mortals won,
true Son of God and Mary's son,
the highborn King of ages!
In your blest body let me be,
e'en as the branch is in the tree,
your life my life supplying.
Sighing, crying
for the savor
of your favor,
resting never
till I rest in you forever.

3 O mighty Father, in your Son
you loved me ere you had begun
this ancient world's foundation.
Your Son has made a friend of me,
and when in spirit him I see,
I joy in tribulation.
What bliss is this!
He is living,
to me giving
life forever;
nothing me from him can sever.

4 Oh, joy to know that you, my friend,
are Lord, beginning without end,
the first and last, eternal!
And you at length — O glorious grace —
will take me to that holy place
the home of joys supernal.
Amen, amen!
Come and meet me,
quickly greet me!
With deep yearning,
Lord, I look for your returning.

5 Lift up the voice and strike the string,
let all glad sounds of music ring
in God's high praises blended.
Christ will be with me all the way,
today, tomorrow, ev'ry day
till trav'ling days are ended.
Sing out ring out
triumph glorious,
O victorious
chosen nation;
praise the God of your salvation.

Source: Christian Worship: Hymnal #370

Translator: Henry Harbaugh

Harbaugh, Henry, D.D., born in Franklin Co., Pennsylvania, Oct. 24, 1817, was of Swiss descent. In early life he was a farmer, carpenter, and teacher; but in 1840 he entered Marshall College, Mercersburg. Entering the ministry of the German Reformed body, he became, in 1844, Pastor at Lewisburg, Lancaster and Lebanon, Pennsylvania, and in 1864 Professor in Theology at Mercersburg. He died Dec. 27, 1867. He was Editor of the Guardian and the Mercersburg Review, in which he advocated what was called "Mercersburg Theology." His published works include sundry books about Heaven; Poems, Philadelphia, 1860, and Hymns & Chants for Sunday Schools, Lebanon, 1861. This last includes his hymns. The best known and most widely used of his compositions a… Go to person page >

Author: Philipp Nicolai

Philipp Nicolai (b. Mengeringhausen, Waldeck, Germany, 1556; d. Hamburg, Germany, 1608) lived an eventful life–he fled from the Spanish army, sparred with Roman Catholic and Calvinist opponents, and ministered to plague-stricken congregations. Educated at Wittenberg University, he was ordained a Lutheran pastor in 1583 in the city of Herdecke. However, he was soon at odds with the Roman Catholic town council, and when Spanish troops arrived to reestablish Roman dominance, Nicolai fled. In 1588 he became chief pastor at Altwildungen and court preacher to Countess Argaretha of Waldeck. During that time Nicolai battled with Calvinists, who disagreed with him about the theology of the real presence of Christ in the Lord's Supper. These doctri… Go to person page >

Text Information

First Line: How lovely shines the morning star! The nations see and hail afar
Title: How Lovely Shines the Morning Star
German Title: Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern
Author: Philipp Nicolai
Translator: Henry Harbaugh
Meter: 8.8.7.8.8.7.2.2.4.4.4.8
Language: English
Copyright: Public Domain

Tune

WIE SCHÖN LEUCHTET

Adapting a tune written for Psalm 100 found in Wolff Köphel's Psalter (1538), Nicolai composed WIE SCHÖN LEUCHTET, which was published with the text in 1599. Although the tune was originally more varied rhythmically, the hymnal version here is isorhythmic (all equal rhythms) and set to the rich ha…

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Instances

Instances (1 - 6 of 6)
Text

Christian Worship (1993) #79

Text

Christian Worship #370

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Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary #167

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The Cyber Hymnal #2477

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Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) #515

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Trinity Psalter Hymnal #296

Include 7 pre-1979 instances
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