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Tune Identifier:"^upp_min_tunga$"

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WELLS

Appears in 18 hymnals Incipit: 12313 45344 65545 Used With Text: Hark! what mean those holy voices

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Upp, min tunga!

Author: J. O. Wallin; V. H. C. Fortunatus, d. 609; G. Ollon Appears in 6 hymnals Used With Tune: [Upp, min tunga]
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Amen sjunge hvarje tunga!

Author: Lina Sandell Meter: 4.4.7.4.4.7.4.4.7 Appears in 3 hymnals First Line: Amen sjunge Lyrics: 1 Amen sjunge Hvarje tunga! Amen är vår himlasång. Amen få vi Evigt sjunga Amen för Guds tron en gång. Amen, där är Lifvets älf, Amen kallar han sig själf. 2 Amen, Herrens Krist skall råda, Amen är hans löftesord. Amen, vi hans Under skåda; Amen, Herrens kraft är spord. Amen, botad Är all nöd, Amen, bytt i lif vår död. 3 Amen, lov och pris och ära, Amen, Lammet och vår Gud! Amen, klinge fjärran nära! Amen är vår lofsångs ljud. Amen, snart vi kronan få, Amen, amen ske alltså! Topics: Ordet och Gudstjänsten; The Word and the Worship Used With Tune: UPP, MIN TUNGA

Praise the Savior, Now and Ever

Author: Venantius Honorius Fortunatus, 530-609 Meter: 8.7.8.7.8.7 Appears in 1 hymnal Topics: Easter; Easter Used With Tune: UPP, MIN TUNGA Text Sources: Tr.. Service Book and Hymnal, 1958, alt.

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Published text-tune combinations (hymns) from specific hymnals

Upp, min tunga!

Author: J. O. Wallin; V. H. C. Fortunatus, d. 609; G. Ollon Hymnal: Svenska Psalm-Boken af År 1819 #106 (1892) Languages: Swedish Tune Title: [Upp, min tunga]
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Amen sjunge hvarje tunga!

Author: Lina Sandell Hymnal: Lutherförbundets Sångbok #S70 (1913) Meter: 4.4.7.4.4.7.4.4.7 First Line: Amen sjunge Lyrics: 1 Amen sjunge Hvarje tunga! Amen är vår himlasång. Amen få vi Evigt sjunga Amen för Guds tron en gång. Amen, där är Lifvets älf, Amen kallar han sig själf. 2 Amen, Herrens Krist skall råda, Amen är hans löftesord. Amen, vi hans Under skåda; Amen, Herrens kraft är spord. Amen, botad Är all nöd, Amen, bytt i lif vår död. 3 Amen, lov och pris och ära, Amen, Lammet och vår Gud! Amen, klinge fjärran nära! Amen är vår lofsångs ljud. Amen, snart vi kronan få, Amen, amen ske alltså! Topics: Ordet och Gudstjänsten; The Word and the Worship Languages: Swedish Tune Title: UPP, MIN TUNGA
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Praise the Saviour

Author: Venantius H. C. Fortunatus; Johan Olaf Wallin Hymnal: Lutherförbundets Sångbok #E108 (1913) Meter: 4.4.7.4.4.7.4.4.7 Lyrics: 1 Praise the Saviour Now and ever! Praise Him all beneath the skies! Prostrate lying, Suff'ring, dying, On the cross, a Sacrifice; Vict'ry gaining, Life obtaining, Now in glory He doth rise. 2 All is finished; And accomplished; Christ is now our Righteousness: He our Saviour, Hath forever Set us free from dire distress. Thro' His merit We inherit Light and peace and happiness. 3 We're delivered, Our bonds severed, Christ hath bruised the serpent's head; Death no longer Is the stronger, Hell itself is captive led. Christ hath risen From death's prison, O'er the tomb He light hath shed. 4 Praise forever For His favor Unto God the Father sing; Praise the Saviour, Praise Him ever, Son of God, our Lord and King; Praise the Spirit, Thro' Christ's merit, He doth us salvation bring. Topics: Easter Languages: English Tune Title: UPP, MIN TUNGA

People

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Authors, composers, editors, etc.

Carolina Sandell

1823 - 1903 Person Name: Lina Sandell Author of "Amen sjunge hvarje tunga!" in Lutherförbundets Sångbok Caroline W. Sandell Berg (b. Froderyd, Sweden, 1832; d. Stockholm, Sweden, 1903), is better known as Lina Sandell, the "Fanny Crosby of Sweden." "Lina" Wilhelmina Sandell Berg was the daughter of a Lutheran pastor to whom she was very close; she wrote hymns partly to cope with the fact that she witnessed his tragic death by drowning. Many of her 650 hymns were used in the revival services of Carl O. Rosenius, and a number of them gained popularity particularly because of the musical settings written by gospel singer Oskar Ahnfelt. Jenny Lind, the famous Swedish soprano, underwrote the cost of publishing a collection of Ahnfelt's music, Andeliga Sänger (1850), which consisted mainly of Berg's hymn texts. Bert Polman

Venantius Honorius Clementianus Fortunatus

540 - 600 Person Name: V. H. C. Fortunatus, d. 609 Author of "Upp, min tunga! " in Svenska Psalm-Boken af År 1819 Venantius Honorius Clematianus Fortunatus (b. Cenada, near Treviso, Italy, c. 530; d. Poitiers, France, 609) was educated at Ravenna and Milan and was converted to the Christian faith at an early age. Legend has it that while a student at Ravenna he contracted a disease of the eye and became nearly blind. But he was miraculously healed after anointing his eyes with oil from a lamp burning before the altar of St. Martin of Tours. In gratitude Fortunatus made a pilgrimage to that saint's shrine in Tours and spent the rest of his life in Gaul (France), at first traveling and composing love songs. He developed a platonic affection for Queen Rhadegonda, joined her Abbey of St. Croix in Poitiers, and became its bishop in 599. His Hymns far all the Festivals of the Christian Year is lost, but some of his best hymns on his favorite topic, the cross of Jesus, are still respected today, in part because of their erotic mysticism. Bert Polman ================== Fortunatus, Venantius Honorius Clementianus, was born at Ceneda, near Treviso, about 530. At an early age he was converted to Christianity at Aquileia. Whilst a student at Ravenna he became almost blind, and recovered his sight, as he believed miraculously, by anointing his eyes with some oil taken from a lamp that burned before the altar of St. Martin of Tours, in a church in that town. His recovery induced him to make a pilgrimage to the shrine of St. Martin, at Tours, in 565, and that pilgrimage resulted in his spending the rest of his life in Gaul. At Poitiers he formed a romantic, though purely platonic, attachment for Queen Rhadegunda, the daughter of Bertharius, king of the Thuringians, and the wife, though separated from him, of Lothair I., or Clotaire, king of Neustria. The reader is referred for further particulars of this part of the life of Fortunatus to Smith and Wace's Dictionary of Christian Biography, vol. ii. p. 552. It is sufficient to say here that under the influence of Rhadegunda, who at that time lived at Poitiers, where she had founded the convent of St. Croix, Fortunatus was ordained, and ultimately, after the death of Rhadegunda in 597, became bishop of Poitiers shortly before his own death in 609. The writings, chiefly poetical, of Fortunatus, which are still extant, are very numerous and various in kind; including the liveliest Vers de Societé and the grandest hymns; while much that he is known to have written, including a volume of Hymns for all the Festivals of the Christian Year, is lost. Of what remains may be mentioned, The Life of St. Martin of Tours, his Patron Saint, in four books, containing 2245 hexameter lines. A complete list of his works will be found in the article mentioned above. His contributions to hymnology must have been very considerable, as the name of his lost volume implies, but what remains to us of that character, as being certainly his work, does not comprise at most more than nine or ten compositions, and of some of these even his authorship is more than doubtful. His best known hymn is the famous "Vexilla Regis prodeunt," so familiar to us in our Church Hymnals in some English form or other, especially, perhaps, in Dr. Neale's translation, "The Royal Banners forward go." The next most important composition claimed for him is "Pange, lingua, gloriosi praelium certaminis," but there would seem to be little doubt according to Sirmond (Notis ad Epist. Sidon. Apollin. Lib. iii., Ep. 4), that it was more probably written by Claudianus Mamertus. Besides these, which are on the Passion, there are four hymns by Fortunatus for Christmas, one of which is given by Daniel, "Agnoscat omne saeculum," one for Lent, and one for Easter. Of "Lustra sex qui jam peregit," of which an imitation in English by Bishop. Mant, "See the destined day arise," is well-known, the authorship is by some attributed to Fortunatus, and by some to St. Ambrose. The general character of the poetry of Venantius Fortunatus is by no means high, being distinguished neither for its classical, nor, with very rare exceptions, for its moral correctness. He represents the "last expiring effort of the Latin muse in Gaul," to retain something of the "old classical culture amid the advancing tide of barbarism." Whether we look at his style, or even his grammar and quantities, we find but too much that is open to criticism, whilst he often offends against good taste in the sentiments he enunciates. Occasionally, as we see in the "Vexilla Regis," he rises to a rugged grandeur in which he has few rivals, and some of his poems are by no means devoid of simplicity and pathos. But these are the exceptions and not the rule in his writings, and we know not how far he may have owed even these to the womanly instincts and gentler, purer influence of Rhadegunda. Thierry, in his Récits des Temps Mérovingiens, Récit 5, gives a lively sketch of Fortunatus, as in Archbishop Trench's words (Sacred Latin Poetry, 1874,p. 132), "A clever, frivolous, self-indulgent and vain character," an exaggerated character, probably, because one can hardly identify the author of "Vexilla Regis," in such a mere man of the world, or look at the writer of "Crux benedicta nitet, Dominus qua carne pependit" q.v., as being wholly devoid of the highest aspirations after things divine. A quarto edition of his Works was published in Rome in 1786. [Rev. Digby S. Wrangham, M.A.] - John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ==================== Fortunatus, V. H. C., p. 384, i. The best edition of his poems is F. Leo's edition of his Opera Poetica, Berlin, 1881 (Monumenta Germaniae, vol. iv.). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

John Cawood

1775 - 1852 Person Name: J. Cawood Author of "Hark! what mean those holy voices" in Laudamus John Cawood was born in 1775, at Matlock, Derbyshire, where his father carried on a small farm. He enjoyed very limited educational advantages. At the age of eighteen he occupied a menial position. But seeking every opportunity of self improvement, and aided by those who interested themselves in his behalf, he was enabled in 1797 to enter S. Edmund Hall, Oxford, and obtained his B.A. in 1801, and his M.A. in 1807. He was ordained in 1801, and most of his life in the ministry was spent as perpetual Curate of S. Ann's Chapel of Ease, Bewdley, Worcestershire. He died in 1852. He published several prose works, but no volume of hymns or poems. His son says, "My father composed about thirteen hymns, which have one by one got into print, though never published by himself, or any one representing him." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ======================= Cawood, John, M. A., born at Matlock, Derbyshire, March 18, 1775. His parents being in humble circumstances, he received in childhood but a limited education, and at 18 was engaged in the service of the Rev. Mr. Cursham, Sutton-in-Ashfield, Notts. Three years' study, however, under careful direction, enabled him to enter St. Edmund Hall, Oxford, in 1797. Obtaining his degree in 1801, he took Holy Orders, and became successively Curate of Ribsford and Dowles, and Incumbent of St. Ann's Chapel of Ease, Bewdley, Worcestershire. He died Nov. 7, 1852. His hymns, 17 in all, were never published by himself. Of these 9 were included in Cotterill's Selection, 8th ed., 1819, Nos. 268-276. Most of these have passed into other collections. These are :— 1. Almighty God, Thy word is cast. After a Sermon. 2. Hark! what mean those holy voices? (1819.) Christmas. 3. Begin a joyful song. (1819.) Christmas. 4. Behold yon wondrous star. (1819.) Epiphany. 5. Trembling with tenderest alarms. (1816.) Finding of Moses. 6. In Israel's fane, by silent night. (1816.) Samuel. 7. King o'er all worlds the Saviour shone. (1819.) Good Friday. 8. Christians, the glorious hope ye know. (1819.1 Plea for Missions. 9. Hark! what mean those lamentations. (1819.) Missions. In addition, Dr. Rogers pub. in his Lyra Britannica, 1867, from the author's manuscript:— 10. A child of sin and wrath I'm born. (1820.) Infant's Prayer. 11. The Sou of God, in worlds on high. (1822.) Christ's Humility. 12. Blessed Father, Great Creator. (1837.) Holy Trinity. These details are from the S. MSS., amongst which there are 5 hymns yet unpublished. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hymnals

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Published hymn books and other collections

Christian Classics Ethereal Hymnary

Publication Date: 2007 Publisher: Grand Rapids, MI: Christian Classics Ethereal Library