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Tune Identifier:"^christe_sanctorum_53432$"

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CHRISTE SANCTORUM

Composer: David Evans Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 133 hymnals Matching Instances: 130 Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 53432 13455 65567 Used With Text: Father, We Praise Thee

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Christ, The Fair Glory

Author: Rabanus Maurus Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 3 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 First Line: Christ the fair glory of the holy angels Used With Tune: CHRISTE SANCTORUM Text Sources: Translation by compilers of Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1950

Lord, as we rise to leave

Author: Fred Kaan, b.1929 Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 10 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 First Line: Lord, as we rise to leave the shell of worship Topics: Cheerfulness; Christian Service; The Church The Sanctuary; Worship Used With Tune: CHRISTE SANCTORUM

Lighten our darkness now the day is ended

Author: Timothy Dudley-Smith (born 1926) Meter: 11.11.11.5 Appears in 3 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 Topics: God's World Days and Nights: Evening Used With Tune: CHRISTE SANCTORUM

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Father, we praise thee, now the night is over

Author: Percy Dearmer,1867-1936 Hymnal: The Hymnal 1982 #1 (1985) Meter: 11.11.11.5 Lyrics: 1 Father, we praise thee, now the night is over, active and watchful, stand we all before thee; singing we offer prayer and meditation: thus we adore thee. 2 Monarch of all things, fit us for thy mansions; banish our weakness, health and wholeness sending; bring us to heaven, where thy saints united joy without ending. 3 All holy Father, Son, and equal Spirit, Trinity blessed, send us thy salvation; thine is the glory, gleaming and resounding through all creation. Languages: English Tune Title: CHRISTE SANCTORUM

Nocte surgentes vigilemus omnes

Author: Gregory the Great 540-604; Percy Dearmer 1867-1936 Hymnal: The Australian Hymn Book with Catholic Supplement #2 (1977) Meter: 11.11.11.5 First Line: Father, we praise you, now the night is over Tune Title: CHRISTE SANCTORUM (1)
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Father, we praise thee, now the night is over

Author: Percy Dearmer, 1867-1936 Hymnal: Common Praise #3 (2000) Meter: 11.11.11.5 Lyrics: 1 Father, we praise thee, now the night is over, active and watchful, stand we all before thee; singing, we offer prayer and meditation; thus we adore thee. 2 Monarch of all things, fit us for thy mansions; banish our weakness, health and wholeness sending; bring us to heaven, where thy saints united joy without ending. 3 All-holy Father, Son and equal Spirit, Trinity blessèd, send us thy salvation; thine is the glory, gleaming and resounding through all creation. Topics: Morning Scripture: John 14:2 Languages: English Tune Title: CHRISTE SANCTORUM

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Rabanus Maurus

776 - 856 Author (attributed to) of "Christ, The Fair Glory" in The Hymn Book of the Anglican Church of Canada and the United Church of Canada Rabanus Maurus (c. 776-856) or Hrabanus Magnentius Maurus, was born of noble parents at Mainz, and educated at Fulda and Tours under Alcuin, who is reputed to have given him the surname, Maurus, after the saint of that name. In 803, he became director of the school at the Benedictine Abbey at Fulda. He was ordained priest in 814, spending the following years in a pilgrimage to Palestine. In 822, he became Abbott at Fulda, retiring in 842. In 847, he became archbishop of Mainz. He died at Winkel on the Rhine, February 4, 856. This distinguished Carolingian poet-theologian wrote extensive biblical commentaries, the Encyclopaedic De Universo, De Institutione Clericorum, and other works which circulated widely during the Middle Ages. Some of his poems, with English translations, are in Helen Waddell's Mediaeval Latin Lyrics. He is the author of: O Come, Creator Spirit, come Christ, the fair glory of the holy angels Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest Creator Spirit, by whose aid --The Hymnal 1940 Companion, New York: The Church Pension Fund (1949) =========================== Hrabanus (Rabanus) Maurus, son of one Ruthard, was born probably at Mainz, about 776. At an early age he was sent to the Monastery of Fulda to receive a religious education. In 801 he was ordained Deacon, and the following year he went to the monastic school of St. Martin at Tours to study under Alcuin, a celebrated teacher of that time, who gave to Hrabanus the name of Maurus to which Hrabanus added Magnentius. On his return to Fulda in 804 he became the head of the school connected with the Monastery. Towards him Ratgar the abbot showed great unkindness, which arose mainly from the fact that Ratgar demanded the students to build additions to the monastery, whilst Hrabanus required them at the same time for study. Hrabanus had to retire for a season, but Ratgar's deposition by Ludwig the Pious, in 817, opened up the way for his return, and the reopening of the school In the meantime, in 814, he had been raised to the Priesthood. Egil, who succeeded Ratgar as abbot, died in 822, and Hrabanus was appointed in his stead. This post he held for some time, until driven forth by some of the community. In 847, on the death of Archbishop Otgar, Ludwig the younger, with whom Hrabanus had sided in his demand for German independence as against the imperialism of his elder brother Lothar, rewarded him with the Archbishopric of Mainz, then the metropolitan see of Germany. He held this appointment to his death on Feb. 4, 856. He was buried first in St. Alban's, Mainz, and then, during the early days of the Reformation, in St. Maurice, Halle, possibly because of the opposition he is known to have made to the doctrine of Transubstantiation. With German historians Hrabanus is regarded as the father of the modern system of education in that country. His prose works were somewhat numerous, but the hymns with which his name is associated are few. We have the "Christe sanctorum decus Angelorum”; “Tibi Christe, splendor Patris”; and the "Veni Creator Spiritus”; but recent research convinces us that the ascription in each case is very doubtful; and none are received as by Hrabanus in Professor Dümmler's edition of the Carmina of Hrabanus in the Poetae Latini aevi Carolini, vol. ii. 1884. Dümmler omits them even from the "hymns of uncertain origin." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix I (1907) ======================= http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabanus_Maurus

John E. Bowers

1923 - 2019 Person Name: John E. Bowers (1923-) Author of "We, the Lord's People" in Common Praise (1998)

Ronald A. Klug

b. 1939 Author of "Rise, Shine, You People" in The United Methodist Hymnal Ronald Allan Klug, 1939- Born: June 26, 1939, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Klug was educated at Dr. Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota (BS 1962). He taught at St. Matthew Lutheran School, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin (1962-65); performed graduate work at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1965-68); was an advertising copyrighter at Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, Missouri (1968-69); was an editor at Augsburg Publishing House (1970-76); and taught English at the American School, Fort Dauphin, Madagascar. His works include: The Strange Young Man in the Desert, 1970 Lord, I’ve Been Thinking, 1978 --www.hymntime.com/tch

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Small Church Music

Editors: Gregory the Great Description: The SmallChurchMusic site was launched in 2006, growing out of the requests from those struggling to provide suitable music for their services and meetings. Rev. Clyde McLennan was ordained in mid 1960’s and was a pastor in many small Australian country areas, and therefore was acutely aware of this music problem. Having also been trained as a Pipe Organist, recordings on site (which are a subset of the smallchurchmusic.com site) are all actually played by Clyde, and also include piano and piano with organ versions. All recordings are in MP3 format. Churches all around the world use the recordings, with downloads averaging over 60,000 per month. The recordings normally have an introduction, several verses and a slowdown on the last verse. Users are encouraged to use software: Audacity (http://www.audacityteam.org) or Song Surgeon (http://songsurgeon.com) (see http://scm-audacity.weebly.com for more information) to adjust the MP3 number of verses, tempo and pitch to suit their local needs. Copyright notice: Rev. Clyde McLennan, performer in this collection, has assigned his performer rights in this collection to Hymnary.org. Non-commercial use of these recordings is permitted. For permission to use them for any other purposes, please contact manager@hymnary.org. Home/Music(smallchurchmusic.com) List SongsAlphabetically List Songsby Meter List Songs byTune Name About  



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