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Rabanus Maurus

776 - 856 Matching Instances: 1 Author (attributed to) of "Christ, The Fair Glory" in The Hymn Book of the Anglican Church of Canada and the United Church of Canada Rabanus Maurus (c. 776-856) or Hrabanus Magnentius Maurus, was born of noble parents at Mainz, and educated at Fulda and Tours under Alcuin, who is reputed to have given him the surname, Maurus, after the saint of that name. In 803, he became director of the school at the Benedictine Abbey at Fulda. He was ordained priest in 814, spending the following years in a pilgrimage to Palestine. In 822, he became Abbott at Fulda, retiring in 842. In 847, he became archbishop of Mainz. He died at Winkel on the Rhine, February 4, 856. This distinguished Carolingian poet-theologian wrote extensive biblical commentaries, the Encyclopaedic De Universo, De Institutione Clericorum, and other works which circulated widely during the Middle Ages. Some of his poems, with English translations, are in Helen Waddell's Mediaeval Latin Lyrics. He is the author of: O Come, Creator Spirit, come Christ, the fair glory of the holy angels Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire Come, Holy Ghost, Creator blest Creator Spirit, by whose aid --The Hymnal 1940 Companion, New York: The Church Pension Fund (1949) =========================== Hrabanus (Rabanus) Maurus, son of one Ruthard, was born probably at Mainz, about 776. At an early age he was sent to the Monastery of Fulda to receive a religious education. In 801 he was ordained Deacon, and the following year he went to the monastic school of St. Martin at Tours to study under Alcuin, a celebrated teacher of that time, who gave to Hrabanus the name of Maurus to which Hrabanus added Magnentius. On his return to Fulda in 804 he became the head of the school connected with the Monastery. Towards him Ratgar the abbot showed great unkindness, which arose mainly from the fact that Ratgar demanded the students to build additions to the monastery, whilst Hrabanus required them at the same time for study. Hrabanus had to retire for a season, but Ratgar's deposition by Ludwig the Pious, in 817, opened up the way for his return, and the reopening of the school In the meantime, in 814, he had been raised to the Priesthood. Egil, who succeeded Ratgar as abbot, died in 822, and Hrabanus was appointed in his stead. This post he held for some time, until driven forth by some of the community. In 847, on the death of Archbishop Otgar, Ludwig the younger, with whom Hrabanus had sided in his demand for German independence as against the imperialism of his elder brother Lothar, rewarded him with the Archbishopric of Mainz, then the metropolitan see of Germany. He held this appointment to his death on Feb. 4, 856. He was buried first in St. Alban's, Mainz, and then, during the early days of the Reformation, in St. Maurice, Halle, possibly because of the opposition he is known to have made to the doctrine of Transubstantiation. With German historians Hrabanus is regarded as the father of the modern system of education in that country. His prose works were somewhat numerous, but the hymns with which his name is associated are few. We have the "Christe sanctorum decus Angelorum”; “Tibi Christe, splendor Patris”; and the "Veni Creator Spiritus”; but recent research convinces us that the ascription in each case is very doubtful; and none are received as by Hrabanus in Professor Dümmler's edition of the Carmina of Hrabanus in the Poetae Latini aevi Carolini, vol. ii. 1884. Dümmler omits them even from the "hymns of uncertain origin." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix I (1907) ======================= http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rabanus_Maurus

John E. Bowers

1923 - 2019 Person Name: John E. Bowers (1923-) Matching Instances: 1 Author of "We, the Lord's People" in Common Praise (1998)

Ronald A. Klug

b. 1939 Matching Instances: 1 Author of "Rise, Shine, You People" in The United Methodist Hymnal Ronald Allan Klug, 1939- Born: June 26, 1939, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Klug was educated at Dr. Martin Luther College, New Ulm, Minnesota (BS 1962). He taught at St. Matthew Lutheran School, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin (1962-65); performed graduate work at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (1965-68); was an advertising copyrighter at Concordia Publishing House, St. Louis, Missouri (1968-69); was an editor at Augsburg Publishing House (1970-76); and taught English at the American School, Fort Dauphin, Madagascar. His works include: The Strange Young Man in the Desert, 1970 Lord, I’ve Been Thinking, 1978 --www.hymntime.com/tch

Clarence Bicknell

1842 - 1918 Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "Estro de l' vivo, ĉiopova Dio" in TTT-Himnaro Cigneta Clarence Bicknell (27 October 1842-17 July 1918) was a British amateur botanist, painter and archaeologist, with a doctorate in mathematics, and an Anglican priest (in Italy, from 1877 until he left the Church, date unknown). He was born in Herne Hill, England, on October 27, 1842, and died in Tenda (then in Italy, but since 1947 in France) on July 17, 1918. Arriving in Italy in 1877 to work as an Anglican vicar, he built a museum ("Museo Biblioteca Clarence Bicknell") in Bordighera to house his botanical and archaeological collections. He became noted for his identification of the plants and petroglyphs of the Ligurian Riviera. His writings included Flowering Plants of the Riviera and Neighboring Mountains (1885) and Guide to the Prehistoric Rock Engravings of the Italian Maritime Alps (1913). In addition to his own museum, his collections were archived at the University of Genoa. A Volapükist, he left that language for Esperanto in 1897. He attended the first international Esperanto convention, at Boulogne-sur-mer, France, in 1905. He produced a number of hymns that are still in use (seven translations and one original in Adoru Kantante (1971), and nine texts in Adoru (2001). He was active in work on behalf of the blind, and transcribed many Esperanto books into braille. In addition to his hymnic work, he wrote many original poems in, and translated secular poetry into, Esperanto, including Macaulay's "Horacio", 1906; Tennyson's "Gvinevero", 1907; pieces by Sturgis; Giacosa's "Ŝakludo", 1915. He also provided monetary support to many Esperanto activities, and founded and led until his death the local Esperanto club in Bordighera. Regrettably, the date, reason, and nature of his "leaving the church" is not explained in the sources consulted (mainly the English, Italian, and Esperanto Wikipedias and the author indexes of the Esperanto hymnals). See also http://www.clarencebicknell.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=16&Itemid=157&lang=en at clarencebicknell.com, the website of the Clarence Bicknell Association. Leland Bryant Ross

Carl P. Daw Jr.

b. 1944 Person Name: Carl P. Daw, Jr. Matching Instances: 1 Author of "Splendor and Honor" in Catholic Book of Worship III Carl P. Daw, Jr. (b. Louisville, KY, 1944) is the son of a Baptist minister. He holds a PhD degree in English (University of Virginia) and taught English from 1970-1979 at the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia. As an Episcopal priest (MDiv, 1981, University of the South, Sewanee, Tennesee) he served several congregations in Virginia, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. From 1996-2009 he served as the Executive Director of The Hymn Society in the United States and Canada. Carl Daw began to write hymns as a consultant member of the Text committee for The Hymnal 1982, and his many texts often appeared first in several small collections, including A Year of Grace: Hymns for the Church Year (1990); To Sing God’s Praise (1992), New Psalms and Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1996), Gathered for Worship (2006). Other publications include A Hymntune Psalter (2 volumes, 1988-1989) and Breaking the Word: Essays on the Liturgical Dimensions of Preaching (1994, for which he served as editor and contributed two essays. In 2002 a collection of 25 of his hymns in Japanese was published by the United Church of Christ in Japan. He wrote Glory to God: A Companion (2016) for the 2013 hymnal of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Emily Brink

Sabine Leonhardt

b. 1919 Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "Christus, das Licht der Welt" in Glaubenslieder

Otmar Schulz

b. 1947 Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "Christus, das Licht der Welt" in Glaubenslieder

Charles L. Ford

b. 1830 Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "The Cross Of Christ" in The Cyber Hymnal Ford, Charles Lawrence, B.A., son of Mr. W. Ford, artist, of Bath, was born at Bath in 1830. Mr. Ford is a graduate of the London University, and is engaged in scholastic work. In 1862 he contributed several poetical pieces to Canon Baynes's Lyra Anglicana, in 1865 to his English Lyrics, and also to the Illustrated Book of Sacred Poetry, n.d. Mr. Ford's hymns and poems were collected and published as Lyra Christi, 1874. From these works the following have come into common use:— 1. Father, for Thy kindest word. (1862.) Strength in Weakness. 2. Lord, from this time we cry to Thee. Christ the Guide of Youth. 3. O Thou, by Whom the balm is borne. In Affliction. 4. This is my Body which is given for you. Holy Communion. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Simon Zachariah

b. 1951 Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "ലോ-ക ദീപ്തി യേശു, മറ്റാരു-മേ-യില്ല" in The Cyber Hymnal

Erik Routley

1917 - 1982 Person Name: Erik Routley, 1917-1982 Matching Instances: 1 Arranger of "CHRISTE SANCTORUM" in Worship and Rejoice

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