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Eternal goodness

Author: John G. Whittier Appears in 12 hymnals Matching Instances: 12 First Line: Within the maddening maze of things Used With Tune: [Within the maddening maze of things]

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SONG 67

Appears in 65 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 Composer and/or Arranger: Orlando Gibbons, 1583-1623 Tune Key: D Major Incipit: 15345 66551 67761 Used With Text: Withing the Maddening Maze of Things
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ES IST EIN BORN

Appears in 325 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 Tune Sources: From the "Gesangbuch mit Noten" Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 17222 13332 34653 Used With Text: When in the Maddening Maze of Things
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[Within the maddening maze of things]

Appears in 649 hymnals Matching Instances: 1 Composer and/or Arranger: Edward MacHugh Tune Key: F Major Incipit: 12321 77662 34321 Used With Text: Eternal goodness

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Within the Maddening Maze of Things

Author: John G. Whittier Hymnal: The Cyber Hymnal #7527 Meter: 8.6.8.6 Lyrics: 1. Within the maddening maze of things, When tossed by storm and flood, To one fixed trust my spirit clings; I know that God is good! 2. No offering of my own I have, Nor works my faith to prove; I can but give the gifts He gave, And plead His love for love. 3. I know not where His islands lift Their fronded palms in air; I only know I cannot drift Beyond His love and care. 4. And so beside the silent sea I wait the muffled oar; No harm from Him can come to me On ocean or on shore. 5. I know not what the future hath Of marvel or surprise, Assured alone that life and death His mercy underlies. Languages: English Tune Title: SONG 67 (Gibbons)

Within [Here in] [Yet in] the maddening maze of things

Author: John G. Whittier; John Greenleaf Whittier Hymnal: Christian Worship and Praise #d496 (1939) Languages: English

Within the maddening maze of things

Author: John G. Whittier; John Greenleaf Whittier Hymnal: The Advent Christian Hymnal #d494 (1967)

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John Greenleaf Whittier

1807 - 1892 Person Name: John G. Whittier Author of "Eternal goodness" in Edward MacHugh's Treasury of Gospel Hymns and Poems Whittier, John Greenleaf, the American Quaker poet, was born at Haverhill, Massachusetts, Dec. 17, 1807. He began life as a farm-boy and shoemaker, and subsequently became a successful journalist, editor and poet. In 1828 he became editor of the American Manufacturer (Boston), in 1830 of the New England Review, and an 1836 (on becoming Secretary to the American Anti-Slavery Society) of the Pennsylvania Freeman. He was also for some time, beginning with 1847, the corresponding editor of the National Era. In 1840 he removed to Amesbury, Massachusetts, where most of his later works have been written. At the present time [1890] he lives alternately at Amesbury and Boston. His first poetical piece was printed in the Newburyport Free Press in 1824. Since then his publications have been numerous, including:— Voices of Freedom, 1833; Songs of Labour, and other Poems, 1850; Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844; The Panorama, and other Poems, 1856; In War Time, 1863; Occasional Poems, 1865; Poetical Works, 1869; Complete Poetical Works, 1876; The Bay of the Seven Islands, and other Poems, 1883, &c. From his numerous poems the following hymns have been compiled, and have come into common use, more especially amongst the American Unitarians:— 1. All as God wills, Who wisely heeds. Trust. This begins with stanza xi. of Whittier's poem, "My Psalm." in his workThe Panorama, and other Poems, 1856 (Complete Poetical Works, Boston, 1876, p. 179), and is given in Lyra Sacra Americana , 1868; Border's Congregational Hymns, 1884, &c. 2. All things are Thine: no gift have we. Opening of a Place of Worship. Written for the Opening of Plymouth Church, Minnesota, 1872 ( Complete Poetical Works , p. 281). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 3. Another hand is beckoning us. Bereavement. From his poem " Gone," written in 1845 (Complete Poetical Works, p. 106). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 4. Dear Lord and Father of mankind. Calmness in God desired. From his poem “The Brewing of Soma," beginning with stanza xii. (Complete Poetical Works p. 266). In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 5. God giveth quietness at last. Death and Burial. This begins with stanza xvii. of his poem, “The Singer," written in 1871 (Author's MS.), and included in the Complete Poetical Works, 1876, p. 265. In Martineau's Hymns, 1875. 6. Hast thou, 'midst life's empty noises. The Purpose of Life. Written in 1842. It is in Longfellow and Johnson's Unitarian Book of Hymns, Boston, 1846, and several other later American collections. Also in Lyra Sacra Americana, 1864. 7. I ask not now for gold to gild. Resignation. From his poem "The Wish of To-Day." Written in 1848 (Author's MS.). In Hedge and Huntingdon's Unitarian Hymns for the Church of Christ, Boston, 1853; the Laudes Domini, 1884, and other collections. 8. Immortal love, for ever full. The Love of Jesus. This poem, entitled “Our Master," appeared in Whittier's work, The Panorama, and other Poems, 1856, in 35 stanzas of 4 lines; in Schaff’s Christ in Song, 1869-70, p. 117; and in the Complete Poetical Works, 1876, p. 231, and others. From this poem the following centos have come into common use:— (1) Immortal love for ever full. In the 1890 edition of the Hymnal Companion and others. (2) 0 Lord and Master of us all. Begins with stanza xvi. (3) 0 Love! O Life! our faith and sight. Begins with stanza xxiv. In several American hymnals, including the Unitarian Hymn [and Tune Book ], Boston, 1868, and others. (4) Our Friend, our Brother, and our Lord. Begins with stanza xxxiv. In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, &c. (5) We faintly hear, we dimly see. Begins with stanza xxvi. In Barrett's Congregational Church Hymnal, 1887. (6) We may not climb the heavenly steeps. Begins with stanza v. In Laudes Domini, 1884; the Primitive Methodist Hymnal, 1887, &c. The use of these centos shows that the hymnic element in the original poem is of a high and enduring order. 9. It may not be our lot to wield. Duty and its Reward. This begins with stanza iv. of his poem "Seedtime and Harvest." Written circa 1850 (Author's MS.). Given in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 114. The hymn is in Laudes Domini, 1884, and other American collections. 10. May freedom speed onward, wherever the blood. Freedom. In the 1848 Supplement to the Boston Book of Hymns, Boston, No. 582, Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and other collections. In Whittier's Poetical Works, Boston, 1869, p. 68, it is given as, “Right onward, O speed it! Wherever the blood”. 11. Now is the seed-time; God alone. Self-Sacrifice. In the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 683. 12. 0 backward-looking son of time. New and Old. This begins with stanza xix. of his poem "The Reformer," and is given in this form in the Boston Hymns for the Church of Christ, Boston, 1853, No. 835, and again in later collections. In full in the Complete Poetical Works, p. 78. 13. 0 beauty, old yet ever new. The Law of Love. This in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, begins with stanza xxi. of his poem on “The Shadow and the Light,” given in full in the Complete Poetical Works , p. 173. 14. 0 fairest-born of love and light. American National Hymn. This is from his poem "Democracy," which is dated "Election Day, 1843," and is in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 214, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 82. 15. 0, he whom Jesus loves has truly spoken. True Worship. This in the 1848 Supplement to the Boston Book of Hymns, 1848, No. 578, begins with stanza xi. of his poem on “Worship," given in full in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 96. The poem is dated by the Author, 1848 (Author's MS.). 16. 0 holy Father, just and true. Freedom. "Lines written for the Celebration of the third Anniversary of British Emancipation at the Broadway Tabernacle, N. Y., First of August, 1837." (Complete Poetical Works, p. 47.) It was included in the Unitarian Christian Hymns, Boston, 1844, and has been repeated in later collections. 17. 0 Maker of the Fruits and Flowers. Flower Services. This begins with stanza iv. of his "Lines for the Agricultural and Horticultural Exhibition at Amesbury and Salisbury, Sep. 28, 1858," as given in his Complete Poetical Works , p. 183. It is in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and as "O Painter of the fruits and flowers," in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 18. O not alone with outward sign. Divine Invitation. This begins with stanza ii. of his poem, "The Call of the Christian," given in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 185, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 73. The hymn appeared in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, and again in later collections. 19. O pure Reformers, not in vain. Freedom. This begins with stanza xii. of his poem "To the Reformers of England," as given in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 77. The hymn was included in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, and has been repeated in later collections. 20. O sometimes gleams upon our sight. Old and New. This is taken from his poem "The Chapel of the Hermits," 1852 (in 94 stanzas of 4 lines), and begins with stanza xi. (Comp. Poetical Works, p. 115.) The cento was given in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, and repeated in later collections. 21. O Thou, at Whose rebuke the grave. Mercy. This was given in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1848, No. 44l. 22. O [God] Thou, Whose presence went before. National Hymn. This hymn is dated by the author 1834 (Author's MS.), and was written for the Anti-slavery Meeting at Chatham Street Chapel, New York, "on the 4th of the 7th month, 1831." It is No. 750 in the Unitarian Christian Hymns, 1844. It is sometimes given as “0 God, whose presence went before." 23. 0, what though our feet may not tread where Christ trod. Presence of Christ's Spirit. The author dates this 1837 (Author's MS.). It is No. 150 in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846. In their Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 652, it begins: "0, wherefore the dream of the earthly abode." Both centos are from his poem “Poledom." 24. Shall we grow weary in our watch? Patience, or Resignation. This begins with stanza x. of his poem "The Cypress-Tree of Ceylon." (Complete Poetical Works, p. 84.) This form of the text was given in the Boston Book of Hymns, 1846, No. 278, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, in 3 stanzas. 25. Sport of the changeful multitude. Persecution. This begins with line 6 of stanza x. of his poem "Ezekiel," and was given in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, No. 65lines In full in Complete Poetical Works, p. 67. 26. The green earth sends its incense up. Worship of Nature. The author dates this 1845 (Author's MS.). It is from his poem “The Worship of Nature," and was given in this form in the Boston Hymns for the Church of Christ, 1853, No. 193. The cento "The harp at Nature's advent strung," in the Unitarian Hymn [and Tune] Book, Boston, 1868, No. 195, is from the same poem. The cento No. 321 in the Boston Hymns of the Spirit, 1864, is also (altered) from this poem. 27. The path of life we walk today. The Shadowing Rock. This in the Boston Hys. of the Spirit, 1864, begins with stanza i. of his poem on "The Rock in El Gh'or," which the author dates 1859 (Author's MS.). In full in Complete Poetical Works, p. 180. 28. Thine are all the gifts, 0 God. Children's Missions, or Ragged Schools. Written for the Anniversary of the Children's Mission, Boston, 1878. It is given in Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 29. Thou hast fallen in thine armour. Death. From his poem "To the memory of Charles B. Storrs, late President of Western Reserve College," published in his Ballads and other Poems, London, 1844, p. 84. Dated by the author 1835 (Author's MS.). Abridged form in the Hymns of the Spirit, 1864. 30. To-day, beneath Thy chastening eye. Seeking Rest. This begins with stanza iv. of his poem, "The Wish of To-Day," dated by the author 1847 (Author's MS.), and given in full in his Complete Poetical Works, p. 114. The cento is in Martineau's Hymns, 1873, and others. 31. We see not, know not; all our way. Resignation. "Written at the opening of the Civil War, 1861" (Author's MS.), and included in his In War Time, 1863, and his Complete Poetical Works, p. 190. In full in the Prim. Methodist Hymnal, 1887. 32. When on my day of life the night is falling. Old Age. Written in 1882 (Author's MS.), and included in his work The Bay of the Seven Islands, and other Poems, 1883. In Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884. 33. With silence only as their benediction. Death. 1845. "Written on the death of Sophia Sturge, sister of Joseph Sturge, of Birmingham, England" (Author's MS.). It is in several collections, including Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873; Horder's Congregational Hymns, 1884, and others. Notwithstanding this extensive use of portions of Mr. Whittier's poems as hymns for congregational use, he modestly says concerning himself: "I am really not a hymn-writer, for the good reason that I know nothing of music. Only a very few of my pieces were written for singing. A good hymn is the best use to which poetry can be devoted, but I do not claim that I have succeeded in composing one." (Author's MS.) We must add, however, that these pieces are characterized by rich poetic beauty, sweet tenderness, and deep sympathy with human kind. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================== Whittier, J. G, p. 1277, i. In addition to the large number of this author's hymns already annotated from his own manuscript, the following have also come into use, mainly in the form of centos from his poems, during the past ten years:— i. From Poems, 1850:— 1. O brother man! Fold to thy heart thy brother. [Brotherly Love.] From his poem, “Worship." Written in 1848, and published in Poems, 1850. ii. From Songs of Labour, and Other Poems, 1850;— 2. Bowed down in lowliness of min. [Resignation.] From the poem “The Wish of To-day." iii. From The Chapel of the Hermits, and Other Poems, 1853:— 3. O, sometimes glimpses on our sight. [Light in Darkness.] First published in The National Era, 1851, and again as above, 1853. In The Pilgrim Hymnal, N.Y. 1904, it begins " 0 sometimes gleams upon our sight," and in Hymns of the Ages, 1904, "Yet sometimes glimpses on my sight"; see p. 1277, ii. 20. iv. From The Panorama, and Other Poems, 1856:— 4. Thou, 0 most compassionate. [Divine Compassion.] This cento is from the poem "My Dream," and is dated 1855. v. From Home Ballads and Poems, 1860:— 5. I mourn no more my vanished years. [Life's Review.] A cento from "My Psalm," dated 1859, opening with st. i. 6. No longer forward nor behind. This begins with st. iii. of "My Psalm." 7. O hearts of love, O souls that turn. [Life from, Christ.] A cento from the poem, "The Overheart." 8. O Love Divine, Whose constant beam. [Divine Love Universal.] From the poem, "The Shadow and the Light." The form in which it is given in The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, first appeared in The Independent, Nov. 1860. 9. Once more the liberal year laughs out. [Autumn.] From his "For an Autumn Festival," 1859. vi. From In War Time, and Other Poems, 1864:— 10. I can only urge the plea. [Cry for Mercy.] A cento from “Andrew Rykman’s Prayer,” dated 1863. 11. What Thou wilt, O Father, give. Also from “Andrew Kykman's Prayer." vii. From The Tent on the Beach, and Other Poems, 1867:— 12. I bow my forehead to [in] the dust. St. ix., &c. 13. I know not what the future hath. St. xvi., &c. 14. I long for household voices gone. St. xv., &c. 15. I see the wrong that round me lies. St. x., &c. 16. Who fathoms the Eternal Thought. St. iv., &c. 17. Yet, in the maddening maze of things. St. xi., &c. These centos are taken from the poem, "The Eternal Goodness," which is dated 1865. viii. From Among the Hills, and Other Poems, 1869:— 18. For ever round the mercy-seat. [God's Love and Man's Unfaithfulness.] From the poem, “The Answer." ix. From The Pennsylvania Pilgrim, and Other Poems, 1873:— 19. Best for the weary hands is good. [Daily Renewal.] This is from "My Birthday," which appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, 1871, and again as above, 1873. x. From Hazel Blossoms, 1875:— 20. All things [gifts] are Thine, p. 1277, i. 2. The church for which this was written, in 1873, was Plymouth Church, St. Paul, Minn. The hymn was included in Hazel Blossoms, 1875. 21. We need love's tender lessons taught. [Love.] From Child-Songs," in Hazel Blossoms, opening with st. ix. xi. From The Bay of the Seven Islands, 1883:— 22. As from the lighted hearths behind me. [Anticipation of the Future.] This begins with st. iii. of the poem, "What the Traveller said at Sunset." xii. Additional Notes:— 23. Lord, for the things we see. [Public Gatherings.] This hymn is from "Poledom," 1837. 24. Not always as the whirlwind's rush. [Call to the Ministry.] Published in The Poetical Writings, 1857, Vol. i., p. 254, and again in the Oxford edition of his Poetical Works, 1904, p. 455. It is dated 1833. 25. Sound over all waters, [The Coming Kingdom.) This, in Horder's Worship Song, 1905, is from Whittier's Complete Poetical Works, Boston, 1876, p. 280, where it is dated 1873. 26. Take courage, Temperance workers. [Temperance.] Mr. Pickard, Whittier's literary executor, cannot trace this hymn in any of the author's writings, and we also are at fault. 27. The harp at Nature's advent strung. [Nature's acknowledgement of God.] Dr. Charles L. Noyes, one of the editors of The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, writes us concerning this hymn: "It was first published in its present form [as in the American hymn-books] in 1867 in The Tent on the Beach." But a hymn almost identical was written when Whittier was in his teens, and published in the Haverhill Gazette, October 5, 1827. The same poem appeared in The Palladium, 1829. It was revised for The Tent on the Beach, 1867 (p. 1278, i. 26). 28. We see not, know not; all our way, p. 1278, i. 31. This hymn, written in 1861, first appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, 1862, vol. 10, p. 235. 29. Wherever through the ages rise. [Love is universal.] Opens with line 1 of a section in the poem "Miriam," in Miriam, and Other Poems, 1871, p. 13. 30. Who calls Thy glorious service hard? [Duty.] This begins with st. iii. of his poem "Seedtime and Harvest," noted on p. 1277, ii. 9. 31. O Lord and Father of mankind. This is a slightly altered form of "Dear Lord and Father of mankind." p. 1277, i. 4. The poem, “Our Master," stated on p. 1277, i., No. 8, as having appeared in The Panorama, 1856, in error, was given in The Tent on the Beach, and Other Poems, Boston, 1867, pp. 143-152. In compiling the foregoing, we have been materially assisted by Mr. Pickard, the poet's literary executor, and the Rev. Dr. Charles L. Noyes, of Somerville, Mass. Whittier died at Hampton Falls, New Hampshire, Sep. 7, 1892. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ======================= See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Orlando Gibbons

1583 - 1625 Composer of "SONG 67 (Gibbons)" in The Cyber Hymnal Orlando Gibbons (baptised 25 December 1583 – 5 June 1625) was an English composer, virginalist and organist of the late Tudor and early Jacobean periods. He was a leading composer in the England of his day. Gibbons was born in Cambridge and christened at Oxford the same year – thus appearing in Oxford church records. Between 1596 and 1598 he sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge, where his brother Edward Gibbons (1568–1650), eldest of the four sons of William Gibbons, was master of the choristers. The second brother Ellis Gibbons (1573–1603) was also a promising composer, but died young. Orlando entered the university in 1598 and achieved the degree of Bachelor of Music in 1606. James I appointed him a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, where he served as an organist from at least 1615 until his death. In 1623 he became senior organist at the Chapel Royal, with Thomas Tomkins as junior organist. He also held positions as keyboard player in the privy chamber of the court of Prince Charles (later King Charles I), and organist at Westminster Abbey. He died at age 41 in Canterbury of apoplexy, and a monument to him was built in Canterbury Cathedral. A suspicion immediately arose that Gibbons had died of the plague, which was rife in England that year. Two physicians who had been present at his death were ordered to make a report, and performed an autopsy, the account of which survives in The National Archives: We whose names are here underwritten: having been called to give our counsels to Mr. Orlando Gibbons; in the time of his late and sudden sickness, which we found in the beginning lethargical, or a profound sleep; out of which, we could never recover him, neither by inward nor outward medicines, & then instantly he fell in most strong, & sharp convulsions; which did wring his mouth up to his ears, & his eyes were distorted, as though they would have been thrust out of his head & then suddenly he lost both speech, sight and hearing, & so grew apoplectical & lost the whole motion of every part of his body, & so died. Then here upon (his death being so sudden) rumours were cast out that he did die of the plague, whereupon we . . . caused his body to be searched by certain women that were sworn to deliver the truth, who did affirm that they never saw a fairer corpse. Yet notwithstanding we to give full satisfaction to all did cause the skull to be opened in our presence & we carefully viewed the body, which we found also to be very clean without any show or spot of any contagious matter. In the brain we found the whole & sole cause of his sickness namely a great admirable blackness & syderation in the outside of the brain. Within the brain (being opened) there did issue out abundance of water intermixed with blood & this we affirm to be the only cause of his sudden death. His death was a shock to peers and the suddenness of his passing drew comment more for the haste of his burial – and of its location at Canterbury rather than the body being returned to London. His wife, Elizabeth, died a little over a year later, aged in her mid-30s, leaving Orlando's eldest brother, Edward, to care for the children left orphans by this event. Of these children only the eldest son, Christopher Gibbons, went on to become a musician. One of the most versatile English composers of his time, Gibbons wrote a quantity of keyboard works, around thirty fantasias for viols, a number of madrigals (the best-known being "The Silver Swan"), and many popular verse anthems. His choral music is distinguished by his complete mastery of counterpoint, combined with his wonderful gift for melody. Perhaps his most well known verse anthem is This is the record of John, which sets an Advent text for solo countertenor or tenor, alternating with full chorus. The soloist is required to demonstrate considerable technical facility at points, and the work at once expresses the rhetorical force of the text, whilst never being demonstrative or bombastic. He also produced two major settings of Evensong, the Short Service and the Second Service. The former includes a beautifully expressive Nunc dimittis, while the latter is an extended composition, combining verse and full sections. Gibbons's full anthems include the expressive O Lord, in thy wrath, and the Ascension Day anthem O clap your hands together for eight voices. He contributed six pieces to the first printed collection of keyboard music in England, Parthenia (to which he was by far the youngest of the three contributors), published in about 1611. Gibbons's surviving keyboard output comprises some 45 pieces. The polyphonic fantasia and dance forms are the best represented genres. Gibbons's writing exhibits full mastery of three- and four-part counterpoint. Most of the fantasias are complex, multisectional pieces, treating multiple subjects imitatively. Gibbons's approach to melody in both fantasias and dances features a capability for almost limitless development of simple musical ideas, on display in works such as Pavane in D minor and Lord Salisbury's Pavan and Galliard. In the 20th century, the Canadian pianist Glenn Gould championed Gibbons's music, and named him as his favorite composer. Gould wrote of Gibbons's hymns and anthems: "ever since my teen-age years this music ... has moved me more deeply than any other sound experience I can think of." In one interview, Gould compared Gibbons to Beethoven and Webern: ...despite the requisite quota of scales and shakes in such half-hearted virtuoso vehicles as the Salisbury Galliard, one is never quite able to counter the impression of music of supreme beauty that lacks its ideal means of reproduction. Like Beethoven in his last quartets, or Webern at almost any time, Gibbons is an artist of such intractable commitment that, in the keyboard field, at least, his works work better in one's memory, or on paper, than they ever can through the intercession of a sounding-board. To this day, Gibbons's obit service is commemorated every year in King's College Chapel, Cambridge. --wikipedia.org

Edward MacHugh

Arranger of "[Within the maddening maze of things]" in Edward MacHugh's Treasury of Gospel Hymns and Poems