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Thomas H. Gill

1819 - 1906 Matching Instances: 72 Author of "We come unto our fathers' God" in The Hymnal Gill, Thomas Hornblower, was born at Bristol Road, Birmingham, Feb. 10th, 1819. His parents belonged to English Presbyterian families which, like many others, had become Unitarian in their doctrine. He was educated at King Edward's Grammar School under Dr. Jeune, afterwards Bishop of Peterborough. He left the school in 1838, and would have proceeded to the University of Oxford, but was prevented by his hereditary Unitarianism (long since given up), which forbade subscription to the Articles of the Church of England then necessary for entrance to the University. This constrained him to lead the life of an isolated student, in which he gave himself chiefly to historical and theological subjects. Hence his life has been singularly devoid of outward incident; and its interest gathers about his hymns, and the seasons of overmastering thought and feeling which gave them birth. The only events that can be chronicled are the publications of his books (see below). It is in the singular combination of influences which has formed his character and determined his thinking that the real interest of his life consists. Here is to be found the true key to the understanding of his hymns. To his Puritan ancestry may be traced their deep religiousness; to his Unitarian training their ethical earnestness; and to his poetical temperament their freeness from conventionality. Delight in the divine songs of Watts was his earliest intellectual enjoyment; and in after years the contrast between their native force and fulness and their dwindled presentation in Unitarian hymnbooks began that estrangement from his hereditary faith which gradually became complete. These various influences mingled in his own hymns and have conspired to render him what Dr. Freeman Clarke calls him, "a more intellectual Charles Wesley." He belongs to the small company of really original hymnists. His hymns are marked by a remarkable absence of, and even opposition to, all antiquarian and sacerdotal ideas of Christianity, a keen discernment of the spirit rather than the mere letter of the Gospel; and profound thought on Scripture themes, so that some of his hymns are too subtle for use in the ordinary worship of the Church. Their style is characterized by a certain quaintness of expression reminding one of George Wither or John Mason, but modified by the influence of Watts's warmth of feeling. They have great sweetness of melody, purity of diction, and happy adaptation of metre and of style to the subject of each hymn. They are almost exclusively used by Nonconformists. Dale's English Hymnbook contains 39; the Baptist Hymnal, 19; Horder's Congregational Hymns, 11; Martineau's Hymns of Praise & Prayer, 11; and the Congregational Church Hymnal, 14. The following are Mr. Gill's published works:— (1) The Fortunes of Faith, 1841; (2) The Anniversaries (Poems in commemoration of great Men and great Events), 1858; (3) The Papal Drama (an historical essay), 1866; (4) The Golden Chain of Praise Hymns by Thomas H. Gill, 1869; (5) Luther's Birthday (Hymns), 1883; (6) The Triumph of Christ (Memorials of Franklin Howard), 1883. Mr. Gill's hymns number nearly 200. Of these, over 80 are in common use in Great Britain and America. The most widely used of these:— "Everlasting, changing never"; "O mean may seem this house of clay"; "O wherefore, Lord, doth Thy dear praise"; “Our God, our God, Thou shinest here"; "The glory of the spring, how sweet"; and "Thou biddest, Lord, Thy sons be bold"; are annotated under their respective first lines, the rest are noted below. [Rev. W. Garrett Horder] The 75 hymns which follow are all annotated from the author's manuscript notes, kindly supplied for use in this work:— 1. Ah tremblers, fainting and forlorn. Eternal Youth. Written in 1868, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 149, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. In 1873 Martineau gave stanzas iv.-ix. in his Hymns, &c, No. 256, as, "Young souls, so strong the race to run." These were repeated in the Baptist Hymnal, 1879, as No. 862. 2. Alas the outer emptiness. Consecration of the Heart. Contributed to G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1846, No. 121, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. It was introduced to the American Unitarian collections through Hedge & Huntington's Hymns for the Church of Christ, 1853, No. 619. 3. Alas these pilgrims faint and worn. Whitsuntide. Written in 1853, and first published in his Anniversaries, 1858, p. 73, in 11 stanzas of 4 lines, then in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1862, the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 107, &c. 4. Alone with Thee, with Thee alone. Worship in Solitude. Written in 1856, and first published in his Golden Chain , &c, 1869, p. 26, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. 5. And didst thou, Lord, our sorrows take? Passiontide. Written in 1849, and published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 45, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in several English collections. 6. Behold the everlasting Son. Ascension. Written in 1862, and first printed in the Hagley Magazine, and then in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1862, and the Golden Chain, 1869, p. 47, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. 7. Break, newborn year, on glad eyes break. New Year. Written in 1855, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 144, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. It is one of the most popular of the author's hymns, and is found in many collections. 8. Bright Presence! may my soul have part. Witness of the Spirit. Written in 1849, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 100, in 8 stanzas of 8 lines. It is repeated in The Songs of the Spirit, N. Y., 1871. 9. Bright Thy presence when it breaketh. Public Worship. Written in 1856, and first publised in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 27, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines. In the Baptist Hymnal, 1879, and in Dale's English Hymnbook it is in an abridged form. 10. Day divine! when sudden streaming. Whit-Sunday. Written on Whit-Sunday, 1850, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1859, and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 97, in 3 stanzas of 8 lines. In some American collections, as the Dutch Reformed Hymns of the Church, 1869, it is given as "Day divine, when in the temple." 11. Dear Lord and Master mine. Resignation. Written in 1868, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 162, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in somewhat extensive use both in Great Britain and America. 12. Dear Lord, Thou art not sorry. Passiontide. Written in 1866, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 58, in 5 stanzas of 8 lines. 13. Dear Lord, Thy light Thou dost not hide . Christian Labours . No. 125 in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, p. 178, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines on the text, "Let your light so shine before men," &c, and was written in 1855. 14. Do we only give Thee heed . Jesus the Gladdener of Life. Written in 1849, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853; and again in the Golden Chain, &c, No. 145, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines. In use in Great Britain and America. 15. Embrace your full Salvation. Heaven. Written in 1870, and first printed in The Congregationalist, 1873, in 9 stanzas of 8 lines. On including it in his English Hymnbook, 1874, Dr. Dale transposed some of the stanzas. 16. Farewell, delightful day. Sunday Evening . Written in 1867, and published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 19, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Church Praise Book, N. Y., 1882, st. i., viii., ix., are given with the alteration of the opening line as, "Holy, delightful day." Dr. Hatfield, in his Church Hymnbook, N. Y., 1872, has the same opening, but he omits stanzas iv.-vi. of the original. 17. Father, glorious with all splendour. Holy Trinity. This hymn of great merit was written in 1860, and published in the Golden Chain, &c, in 1869, No. 4, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. In some American collections, including Hymns & Songs of Praise, N. Y., 1874, No. 17, stanzas iv., vi., vii., are given as "Father, Thine elect who lovest." 18. Father, hast Thou not on me. Eternal Love . A Trinitarian hymn on eternal love, composed in 1867, and published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 139, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. In 1869, stanzas v.-vii. were given in the Supplement to the New Congregational Hymn Book, as "Mighty Quickener, Spirit blest." 19. Full many a smile, full many a song. Joy in God the Father. Written in 1854, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 8, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. In Dale's English Hymn Book, 1874, No. 21, st. ii., which applied personally to the author alone, was omitted. 20. How can I, Lord, abide with Thee? Prayer. “Produced in 1856. Struck with the didactic character of Cowper's and Montgomery's hymns, ‘What various hindrances we meet,’ and ‘Prayer is the soul's sincere desire,’ I greatly wished to set forth the soul's view of prayer, simply, naturally, poetically, and achieved this hymn with much aspiration and satisfaction." Printed in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 119, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines, and headed "Pray without ceasing." 21. How, Lord, shall vows of ours be sweet? Public Worship. The author's earliest hymn. It was written in 1845, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1846, No. 114, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines, and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 2. It is in several American hymnbooks. 22. Is earth too fair, is youth too bright? Consecration of Youth to God. Written in 1848, and first pub. in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 102, in 13 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled "The Hymn of Youth." 23. Is not my spirit filled with Thine. God glorious in His works. "Written in the summer of 1846 among the hills and streams of Derbyshire," and first published in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 15, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled "God glorious in His works." 24. Let bolder hearts the strife require. Prayer against Temptation. No. 218 in Martineau's Hymns of Praise and Prayer, 1873. It was written in 1851, and first published in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. 25. Lift thy song among the nations. National Hymn. Written in 1853, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853, in 4 stanzas of 8 lines. When repeated in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 62, an additional stanza (iii.) was given, and it was entitled "England's Hymn." It is a spirited hymn and worthy of greater circulation than it now has. The 1869 text is given in Dale's English Hymn Book, 1874, No. 1239. 26. Lord, am I precious in Thy sight. Grieve not the Holy Spirit. Composed in 1850, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853. In 1869 it was included in the Golden Chain , &c, No. 70, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in common in America. A cento is also in the Supplement to the New Congregational, 1869, No. 1095. It is composed of stanzas iii., v., vi. much altered, and not improved, and begins, "O Holy Spirit, dost thou mourn?" 27. Lord, comes this bidding strange to us ? Invitation to Rejoice. Written in 1849, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 144, in 11 stanzas of 4 lines. 28. Lord, dost Thou ne'er Thy servants bless? Free Grace. Written in 1855, on the words of Oliver Cromwell as used by him in a letter to his "beloved cousin Mrs. St. John," dated "Ely, 13th October, 1638. "Truly no poor creature hath more cause to put him self forth in the cause of his God than I. I have had plentiful wages beforehand; and I am sure I shall never earn the least mite." (Carlyle's Oliver Cromwell's Letters and Speeches, &c, Letter ii.) The hymn was first published in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. 29. Lord, from Thee, what grace and glory. National Hymn. This cento in Vince's Collection, 1870, No. 450, is from the poem, on St. George's Day, written in 1853, and published in the author'sAnniversaries, 1858, p. 47. 30. Lord, from these trembling souls of ours. Praise. Composed in 1859, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 3, in 10 stanzas of 4 lines. 31. Lord God, by Whom all change is wrought. God Eternal. Written in 1869, the keynote being the words of St. Augustine, "Immutabilis mutans omnia," and first printed in the Songs of the Spirit, N. Y., 1871. In 1874 it was included in Dale's English Hymn Book; and, in 4 stanzas, in the Baptist Hymnal, 1879. 32. Lord God of old, who wentest. Public Worship. Composed in 1868, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 30, in 5 stanzas of 8 lines. 33. Lord, if our dwelling place thou art Communion of Saints. Written in 1856, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 150, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. The hymn, "Death has no bidding to divide," in Dale's English Hymn Book, 1874, begins with stanzas ii., and omits stanzas i., iv. of this hymn. 34. Lord, in this awful fight with sin. Victory through Christ. Written in 1857, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c., 1869, No. 128, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. 35. Lord, in Thy people Thou dost dwell. Unity of Christ and His people. Written in 1864, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 12 stanzas of 4 lines. 36. Lord, Thou hast been our dwelling place. National Hymn. "Begun among the Waldenses, 1864," and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 59, in 8 stanzas of 7 lines, entitled, "The hymn of the Waldenses," and supplemented with the note, "This hymn as a whole belongs to the Waldenses only, among whom it was begun, but all the people of God have an interest in the first two and the last verses." Acting upon this suggestion of the author, these stanzas were given in the Supplement to the New Congregational, 1869, as No. 1025. 37. Lord, Thou wouldst have us like to Thee. Holiness desired. Written in 1846, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1846, No. 120, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in several American collections. 38. Lord, Thy gracious voice hath spoken. Christ our Caesar. Written in 1849, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853; and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 3 stanzas of 8 lines. 39. Lord, when I all things would possess. Humility. Written in 1850, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 111, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. In Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873, No. 304, stanzas ii., iv., vii. are omitted. This hymn is also in common use in America. 40. Lord, when we come at Thy dear call. The Holy Ghost, the Sanctifier. No. 72 in his Golden Chain, 1869, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines, was written in 1856, and is given in the Songs of the Spirit, N. Y., 1871. 41. May we not, Father, meetly mourn? Burial. No. 151 in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 9 st. of 4 lines, was written in 1855. 42. Methought my soul had learned to love. Resignation. "Composed in 1852 and first printed in Golden Chain, 1869. It came from the very depths of my own heart, was inspired by a suppressed trouble which turned out one of the greatest blessings of my life." In the Golden Chain, &c, No. 114, it is given in 7 st. of 4 lines, and is headed, "Not my will but Thine be done." 43. My God, I do not flee from Thee. Joy. Written in 1849, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c., 1869, No. 10, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. The New Congregational, 1369, No. 1119, begins with stanza ii., "Father, Redeemer, Quickener mine," and also omits stanza iv. 44. My God, my Majesty divine. Child of God. Written in 1845, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1846, No. 116, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines, and again, after revision, in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 135. The original text is in common use in America. 45. Not, Lord, Thine ancient works alone. Public Worship. Written in 1874, and first printed in The Congregational, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, and entitled, "The Living God." In Dale's English Hymn Book, 1874, st. iii. is omitted. 46. Not yet I love my Lord. Lent. Written in 1868, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 86, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in several collections, including Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873, No. 199. 47. Not yet, ye people of His grace. Here and Hereafter. A hymn on the "The Vision Beatific," No. 165, in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 11 stanzas of 4 lines. It was written in 1866, and is in American common use. 48. 0 height that doth all height excel. Written in 1853, and "was born of the words of Augustine in the outset of the Confessions, ‘Secretissime et Praesentissime,' and was the first of several hymns inspired by his wonderful antitheses about God." It was first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853, and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 13, in 9 stanzasof 4 lines. It is in English and American common use. 49. 0 Holy Ghost, Who down dost come. Whitsuntide. "Written at Malvern on Whitsunday, 1863; a day of singular spiritual enjoyment, and outward loveliness." It was first published in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 74, in 1 stanza of 4 lines, and headed, "A Breathing after the Holy Spirit," and is in several collections. In Martineau's Hymns, &c, 1873, No. 251, it begins with st. ii., "Spirit of Truth, Who makest bright," st. i. and vi. being omitted. 50. 0 not alone in saddest plight. Divine Guidance desired. Composed in 1856, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 120, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. 51. 0 not to fill the mouth of fame. A Servant of Christ. "Composed in 1849, and printed first in a small collection of poems entitled, I think, “The Violet." In 1853 it was given in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns; and in 1869, in the Golden Chain, &c, No. 121, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. Its use is mainly confined to America. 52. 0 not upon our waiting eyes. Divine Love. Written in 1849, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 29, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. 53. 0 saints of old, not yours alone. Seeking God. Written in 1848, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853; and again, after revision, in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 126, in 10 stanzas of 4 lines. The American hymnbooks have usually the original text, but in Dale's English Hymn Book , 1875, and Holder's Congregational Hymn Book1884, the text is abridged from the Golden Chain. 54. 0 smitten soul that cares and conflicts wring. Heaven desired. Written in 1854, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869. No. 75, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. 55. 0 Spirit, sweet and pure. Constant Presence of the Holy Spirit desired. Written in 1868, and given in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, as No. 127, in 7 stanzas of 8 lines. 56. 0 time, ne'er resteth thy swift wing. Worth of Time. Written in 1855, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 98, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. 57. 0 wherefore hath my spirit leave? Spiritual Changes. "Composed with great ardour and stir of soul in 1847, and first printed in the Golden Chain, 1869," No. 85, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. 58. O'er fulness of grace, blest Britain rejoice. National Hymn. Composed in 1868, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 61, in 11 stanzas of 4 lines, and entitled, "The Thanksgiving Song of Protestant Britain”; to which was added the words of Milton: "Let us all go, every true Protestant Briton, throughout the three kingdoms, and render thanks to God the Father of Light, and to His Son, Jesus Christ our Lord." 59. Saviour, needs the world no longer! Christ All in All. "Written in 1847... it was inspired partly by my contemplation of Shelley's hapless, Christless life." It was first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns 1853, and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 35, in 7 stanzas of 6 lines, and headed, "Lord, to whom shall we go." Its use is limited, and far less than its merits deserve. 60. Saviour, Who from death didst take. The Resurrection of Christ, a cause of Confidence. Written in 1856, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 96, in 5 stanzas of 6 lines. 61. Sweet Spirit, would Thy breath divine. The Holy Ghost, the Purifier, desired. Written in 1856, and given as No. 71 in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 10 stanzas of 4 lines. 62. The happy fields, the heavenly host. Heaven. Written in 1848, first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853, and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 157, in 10 stanzas of 4 lines. 63. Thy happy ones a strain begin. Joy in God. Written in 1846, and published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1846, No. 118, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 146, the text is slightly changed. The text in common use in Great Britain and America is from the original. 64. Too dearly, Lord, hast Thou redeemed. Lent. Written in 1855, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 97, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. 65. Unto thy rest return. Lent. Written in 1866, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 92, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines. 66. We come unto our fathers'God. God our Abode. "The birthday of this hymn, November 22nd, 1868 (St. Cecilia's Day), was almost the most delightful day of my life. Its production employed the whole day and was a prolonged rapture.....It was produced while the Golden Chain was being printed, just in time to be a link therein, and was the latest, as ‘How, Lord, shall vows of ours be sweet?' was the earliest song included therein." In the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, it is No. 129, in 7 stanzas of 7 lines, and is entitled, "The People of God." 67. We triumph in the glorious grace. Citizens of Heaven. Written in 1855, and first published in his Anniversaries, 1858, and again in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 153, in 12 stanzas of 4 lines. 68. What sweetness on Thine earth doth dwell. Nature revealing God. [Summer.] Written in 1850, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. 69. When shall I, Lord, a journey take. Lent. Written in 1856, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 80, in 8 stanzas of 4 lines. It is in common use in Great Britain and America. 70. Whence this naming joy that maketh! The Prodigal's Return. "Written in 1853 just before the hymn beginning 'Thrice blessed soul, who still hath made,' with the text 'Son, thou art ever with me' (Golden Chain, No. 134), which is its completement; and first printed in the Golden Chain," 1869, No. 81, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines. 71. Would the Spirit more completely? The Gifts of the Spirit. Written in 1849, and first published in G. Dawson's Psalms & Hymns, 1853; and again in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 67. in 3 stanzas of 8 lines. 72. Ye children of the Father. Spiritual Worship. Written in 1867, and first published in his Golden Chain. &c, 1869, No. 23, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines. 73. Ye of the Father loved. Praise. Written in 1862, and first published in the Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 5, in 8 stanzas of 8 lines. 74. Ye people of the Lord, draw near. Holy Communion. Written in 1855, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 127, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. 75. Ye souls, the Father's very own. Holy Diligence. Composed in 1867, and first published in his Golden Chain, &c, 1869, No. 142, in 9 stanzas of 4 lines. These hymns are usually abridged in the hymnbooks, the length of most of them being against their use in their full form. Although they are gradually growing in popular esteem, the extent of their use is much more limited than their merits deserve. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ==================== Gill, T. H. , pp. 421-3. Additional hymns to those annotated are in common use:—(l) "O dreadful glory that doth make," a cento from No. 48, p. 423, ii.; (2) "O mystery of Love Divine " (The Love of Christ); (3) " Ye souls for whom the Saviour died" (Electing Love). These are all from his Golden Chain of Praise, 1869. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ======================== Gill, T. H. , pp. 421, i.; 1565, ii. &c. During the past ten years Mr. Gill's hymns have been widely used, especially in America, the result being that the following have to be added to the long lists already annotated as above:— 1. Ah! wherefore fall my tears so fast? [The World Overcome.] Published in his Golden Chain of Praise, 1869, p. 167. The hymn, "O Thou for Whom the strife was strong," in the American Hymns for Church and Home, 1895, is composed of sts. iii.-vii. of this hymn. 2. Dear Lord, Thou bringest back the morn. [Morning.] From his Golden Chain of Praise, 1869, p. 145. 3. I would not give the world my heart. This, in the Amer.Baptist Sursum Corda, 1898, No. 379, is a cento from "With sin I would not make abode," p. 1288, ii. 4. Not only when ascends the song. This in the Amer. Hymns of the Ages, 1904, No. 80, is a cento from “0 Saints of old, not yours alone," p. 423, i. 53. 5. Walk with the Lord! along the road. Composed of sts. v., vii.-ix., of "Ah ! tremblers, fainting and for¬lorn," p. 421, ii. 1. Included in the American Unitarian Hymns for Church and Home, 1895. 6. We would not dare their bliss to mourn. This in the Amer.Unit. Hymns for Church and Home, 1895 is composed of sts. v.-viii. of "May we not, Father, meetly mourn?" p. 422, ii. 41. 7. Wherefore faint and fearful ever. [ God is for us.] Published in the 2nd edition of his Golden Chain of Praise, 1894, No. xiii., in 7 stanzas of 6 lines, and dated 1880. In Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1904, in 5 stanzas. The cento "He Who suns and worlds upholdeth," is composed of stanzas ii., iii., and vii. of the original hymn. Mr. Gill died in 1906. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Martin Luther

1483 - 1546 Person Name: Martin Luther, 1483-1546 Matching Instances: 11 Composer of "LUTHER'S HYMN" in The Book of Praise Luther, Martin, born at Eisleben, Nov. 10, 1483; entered the University of Erfurt, 1501 (B.A. 1502, M.A.. 1503); became an Augustinian monk, 1505; ordained priest, 1507; appointed Professor at the University of Wittenberg, 1508, and in 1512 D.D.; published his 95 Theses, 1517; and burnt the Papal Bull which had condemned them, 1520; attended the Diet of Worms, 1521; translated the Bible into German, 1521-34; and died at Eisleben, Feb. 18, 1546. The details of his life and of his work as a reformer are accessible to English readers in a great variety of forms. Luther had a huge influence on German hymnody. i. Hymn Books. 1. Ellich cristlich lider Lobgesang un Psalm. Wittenberg, 1524. [Hamburg Library.] This contains 8 German hymns, of which 4 are by Luther. 2. Eyn Enchiridion oder Handbuchlein. Erfurt, 1524 [Goslar Library], with 25 German hymns, of which 18 are by Luther. 3. Geystliche Gesangk Buchleyn. Wittenberg, 1524 [Munich Library], with 32 German hymns, of which 24 are by Luther. 4. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1529. No copy of this book is now known, but there was one in 1788 in the possession of G. E. Waldau, pastor at Nürnberg, and from his description it is evident that the first part of the Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, is a reprint of it. The Rostock Gesang-Buch, 1531, was reprinted by C. M. Wiechmann-Kadow at Schwerin in 1858. The 1529 evidently contained 50 German hymns, of which 29 (including the Litany) were by Luther. 5. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Erfurt. A. Rauscher, 1531 [Helmstädt, now Wolfenbüttel Library], a reprint of No. 4. 6. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1535 [Munich Library. Titlepage lost], with 52 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 7. Geistliche Lieder auffs new gebessert. Leipzig. V. Schumann, 1539 [Wernigerode Library], with 68 German hymns, of which 29 are by Luther. 8. Geistliche Lieder. Wittenberg. J. Klug, 1543 [Hamburg Library], with 61 German hymns, of which 35 are by Luther. 9. Geystliche Lieder. Leipzig. V. Babst, 1545 [Gottingen Library]. This contains Luther's finally revised text, but adds no new hymns by himself. In pt. i. are 61 German hymns, in pt. ii. 40, of which 35 in all are by Luther. For these books Luther wrote three prefaces, first published respectively in Nos. 3, 4, 9. A fourth is found in his Christliche Geseng, Lateinisch und Deudsch, zum Begrebnis, Wittenberg, J. Klug, 1542. These four prefaces are reprinted in Wackernagel’s Bibliographie, 1855, pp. 543-583, and in the various editions of Luther's Hymns. Among modern editions of Luther's Geistliche Lieder may be mentioned the following:— Carl von Winterfeld, 1840; Dr. C. E. P. Wackernagel, 1848; Q. C. H. Stip, 1854; Wilhelm Schircks, 1854; Dr. Danneil, 1883; Dr. Karl Gerok, 1883; Dr. A. F. W. Fischer, 1883; A. Frommel, 1883; Karl Goedeke, 1883, &c. In The Hymns of Martin Luther. Set to their original melodies. With an English version. New York, 1883, ed. by Dr. Leonard Woolsey Bacon and Nathan H. Allen, there are the four prefaces, and English versions of all Luther's hymns, principally taken more or less altered, from the versions by A. T. Russell, R. Massie and Miss Winkworth [repub. in London, 1884]. Complete translations of Luther's hymns have been published by Dr. John Anderson, 1846 (2nd ed. 1847), Dr. John Hunt, 1853, Richard Massie, 1854, and Dr. G. Macdonald in the Sunday Magazine, 1867, and his Exotics, 1876. The other versions are given in detail in the notes on the individual hymns. ii. Classified List of Luther's Hymns. Of Luther's hymns no classification can be quite perfect, e.g. No. 3 (see below) takes hardly anything from the Latin, and No. 18 hardly anything from the Psalm. No. 29 is partly based on earlier hymns (see p. 225, i.). No. 30 is partly based on St. Mark i. 9-11, and xvi., 15, 16 (see p. 226, ii.). No. 35 is partly based on St. Luke ii. 10-16. The following arrangement, however, will answer all practical purposes. A. Translations from the Latin. i. From Latin Hymns: 1. Christum wir sollen loben schon. A solis ortus cardine 2. Der du bist drei in Einigkeit. O Lux beata Trinitas. 3. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der von. Jesus Christus nostra salus 4. Komm Gott Schopfer, heiliger Geist. Veni Creator Spiritus, Mentes. 5. Nun komm der Beidenheiland. Veni Redemptor gentium 6. Was flirchst du Feind Herodes sehr. A solis ortus cardine ii. From Latin Antiphons, &c.: 7. Herr Gott dich loben wir. Te Deum laudamus. 8. Verleih uns Frieden gnädiglich. Dapacem, Domine 9. Wir glauben all an einen Gott. iii. Partly from the Latin, the translated stanzas being adopted from Pre-Reformation Versions: 10. Komm, heiliger Geist, Herre Gott. 11. Mitten wir im Leben sind. Media vita in morte sumus. B. Hymns revised and enlarged from Pre-Reformation popular hymns. 12. Gelobet seist du Jesus Christ. 13. Gott der Vater wohn uns bei. 14. Gott sei gelobet und gebenedeiet. 15. Nun bitten wir den heiligen Geist. C. Psalm versions. 16. Ach Gott vom Himmel, sieh darein. 17. Aus tiefer Noth schrei ich zu dir. 18. Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott. 19. Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl. 20. Es wollt uns Gott genädig sein. 21. War Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit. 22. Wohl dem, der in Gotten Furcht steht. D. Paraphrases of other portions of Holy Scripture. 23. Diess sind die heilgen zehn Gebot. 24. Jesaia dem Propheten das geschah. 25. Mensch willt du leben seliglich. 26. Mit Fried und Freud ich fahr dahin. 27. Sie ist mir lieb die werthe Magd. 28. Vater unser im Himmelreich. E. Hymns mainly Original. 29. Christ lag in Todesbanden. 30. Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam. 31. Ein neues Lied wir heben an. 32. Erhalt uns Herr bei deinem Wort. 33. Jesus Christus unser Heiland, Der den, 34. Nun freut euch lieben Christengemein. 35. Vom Himmel hoch da komm ich her. 36. Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar. In addition to these — 37. Fur alien Freuden auf Erden. 38. Kyrie eleison. In the Blätter fur Hymnologie, 1883, Dr. Daniel arranges Luther's hymns according to what he thinks their adaptation to modern German common use as follows:— i. Hymns which ought to be included in every good Evangelical hymn-book: Nos. 7-18, 20, 22, 28, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36, 38. ii. Hymns the reception of which into a hymn-book might be contested: Nos. 2, 3, 4, 19, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 33. iii. Hymns not suited for a hymn-book: Nos. 1, 5, 6, 27, 31, 37. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Joseph Barnby

1838 - 1896 Matching Instances: 7 Composer of "THE GOLDEN CHAIN" in The Hymnal Joseph Barnby (b. York, England, 1838; d. London, England, 1896) An accomplished and popular choral director in England, Barby showed his musical genius early: he was an organist and choirmaster at the age of twelve. He became organist at St. Andrews, Wells Street, London, where he developed an outstanding choral program (at times nicknamed "the Sunday Opera"). Barnby introduced annual performances of J. S. Bach's St. John Passion in St. Anne's, Soho, and directed the first performance in an English church of the St. Matthew Passion. He was also active in regional music festivals, conducted the Royal Choral Society, and composed and edited music (mainly for Novello and Company). In 1892 he was knighted by Queen Victoria. His compositions include many anthems and service music for the Anglican liturgy, as well as 246 hymn tunes (published posthumously in 1897). He edited four hymnals, including The Hymnary (1872) and The Congregational Sunday School Hymnal (1891), and coedited The Cathedral Psalter (1873). Bert Polman

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy

1809 - 1847 Person Name: Felix Mendelssohn, 1809-1847 Matching Instances: 4 Harmonizer of "TO GOD ON HIGH" in The Hymnal Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (b. Hamburg, Germany, 1809; d. Leipzig, Germany, 1847) was the son of banker Abraham Mendelssohn and the grandson of philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. His Jewish family became Christian and took the Bartholdy name (name of the estate of Mendelssohn's uncle) when baptized into the Lutheran church. The children all received an excellent musical education. Mendelssohn had his first public performance at the age of nine and by the age of sixteen had written several symphonies. Profoundly influenced by J. S. Bach's music, he conducted a performance of the St. Matthew Passion in 1829 (at age 20!) – the first performance since Bach's death, thus reintroducing Bach to the world. Mendelssohn organized the Domchor in Berlin and founded the Leipzig Conservatory of Music in 1843. Traveling widely, he not only became familiar with various styles of music but also became well known himself in countries other than Germany, especially in England. He left a rich treasury of music: organ and piano works, overtures and incidental music, oratorios (including St. Paul or Elijah and choral works, and symphonies. He harmonized a number of hymn tunes himself, but hymnbook editors also arranged some of his other tunes into hymn tunes. Bert Polman

Ebenezer Prout

1835 - 1909 Person Name: Dr. Ebenezer Prout, 1835-1909 Matching Instances: 4 Composer of "LAUS SEMPITERNA" in Methodist Hymn and Tune Book

Daniel Hughes

Person Name: D. H. Matching Instances: 1 Translator of "At Dduw ein tadau awn yn hy (We come unto our father's God)" in Mawl a chân = praise and song

Frances Elizabeth Cox

1812 - 1897 Person Name: Frances E. Cox Matching Instances: 1 Author of "We come, our hearts with gladness glowing" in The Pilgrim Hymnal Cox, Frances Elizabeth, daughter of Mr. George V. Cox, born at Oxford, is well known as a successful translator of hymns from the German. Her translations were published as Sacred Hymns from the German, London, Pickering. The 1st edition, pub. 1841, contained 49 translations printed with the original text, together with biographical notes on the German authors. In the 2nd edition, 1864, Hymns from the German, London, Rivingtons, the translations were increased to 56, those of 1841 being revised, and with additional notes. The 56 translations were composed of 27 from the 1st ed. (22 being omitted) and 29 which were new. The best known of her translations are "Jesus lives! no longer [thy terrors] now" ; and ”Who are these like stars appearing ?" A few other translations and original hymns have been contributed by Miss Cox to the magazines; but they have not been gathered together into a volume. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Ehrenfried Liebich

1713 - 1780 Matching Instances: 1 Author of "We come, our hearts with gladness glowing" in The Pilgrim Hymnal Liebich, Ehrenfried, was born July 15, 1713, at Probsthain, near Goldberg, Silesia, where his father was a miller. He assisted his father in the mill up to his sixteenth year, and was thereafter allowed to study at the Latin school at Schweidnitz, and the St. Elisabeth school at Breslau. At Easter, 1738, he entered the University of Leipzig as a student of Theology, and on concluding his course in 1740, was for some time engaged in private tuition. In April, 1742, he became pastor at Lomnitz and Erdmannsdorf, near Hirschberg, Silesia, and remained there till his death on June 23, 1780 (Koch, vi. 391; Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, xviii. 584, &c). Liebich is one of the best German hymn-writers of the middle of the 18th century; Scriptural, heartfelt, and good in style, always edifying, if sometimes too didactic. He had begun hymn-writing about 1749, and contributed 8 hymns to the Hirschberg Gesang-Buch, 1752. A copy of this book fell into the hands of C. F. Gellert during a visit to Carlsbad in 1763, and through his encouragement Liebich began again to compose hymns. He published his compositions as: (1) Geistliche Lieder und Oden, &c, Hirschberg and Leipzig, 1768, with 142 hymns. (2) New ed., Liegnitz, 1773; with a second part, entitled, Geistliche Lieder zur Erbauung, Liegnitz, 1774, with 94 hymns. A considerable number of his hymns passed into German common use, and still hold their place. Those which have been translated into English are:— i. Dir, dir, du Geber aller Gaben. Harvest Thanksgiving. 1768, p. 128, in 16 st. of 6 1., entitled, "The Goodness of God in the Harvest." This has passed into English through the following forms. 1. O dass doch bei der reichen Ernte. This is st. xi.-xvi., as altered by J. S. Diterich, in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1780, No. 172 ; repeated in the Berlin Geistliche Lieder, ed. 1863. From this form the recasts of st. xii.-xvi., beginning, “Kommt, Christen, Gottes Huld zu feiern," were included, as No. 250, in Bunsen's Versuch, 1833, and translated as: Come, Christians, praise your Maker's goodness. A good translation from Bunsen, by Miss Winkworth, as No. 181, in her Chorale Book for England; repeated in the Ohio Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal,1880. 2. Wir kommen deine Huld zu feiern. This is a very greatly altered form of st. xii. ff., as No. 850, in the Berlin Gesang-Buch, 1829; retaining little either from Liebich or Diterich. It is repeated in Bunsen's Versuch, 1833, No. 666, and the Württemberg Gesang-Buch, 1842, No. 543. The translation in common use from this form is:— We come, our hearts with gladness glowing. A good translation from the text of 1829, by Miss Cox, in her Sacred Hymns from the German, 1841, p. 199; repeated, abridged, in the American Unitarian Hymns for the Church of Christ, Boston, 1853, and in Archdeacon Pott's Collection, 1861. Another translation is: "O Lord, Thy goodness we adore," by Lady E. Fortescue, 1843, p. 29. ii. Gott ist getreu! Sein Herz, sein Vaterherz. Trust in God. 1768, p. 181, in 9 st. of 9 lines, entitled, "The faithful God, 1 Cor. x. 13." It is a beautiful hymn, and has been specially appreciated in Württemberg, where it is found in the Württemberg Gesang-Buch, 1791, No. 24 (1842, No. 45). Lauxmann, in Koch, viii. 416, says it was the favourite hymn of J. C. F. Steudel, Professor of Theology at Tübingen, who died 1837; was sung by the Württemberg contingent at a field service near Toul, in August, 18-70, during the Franco-German War, &c. The translations are:— 1. Our God is true! Them He will ne'er forsake. In full, by Dr. H. Mills, in his Horae Germanica, 1845 (1856, p. 182); repeated, abridged, in the American Lutheran General Synod's Collection, 1852, and the Ohio Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1880. 2. My God is true! His heart, a Father's heart. A good and full translation by R. Massie, in his Lyra Domestica, 2nd Ser., 1864, p. 119; repeated, in full, in Reid's Praise Book, 1872; and abridged in the Ibrox Hymnal, 1871. iii. Hier ist mein Herz! Mein Gott, ich geb' es dir. Self-surrender to God. 1768, p. 79, in 9 st. of 9 1. (11. 1, 9 of each st. being "Hier ist mein Herz"), entitled, “Surrender of the heart to God," and suggested by Proverbs xxiii. 26. Included, as No. 763, in the Berlin Geistliche Lieder, ed. 1863. Translated as :— Here is my heart! my God I give it Thee. A good translation, omitting st. iv., by Mrs. Findlater, in Hymns from the Land of Luther, 1st Ser., 1854, p. 16 (1884, p. 21). Included, in full, in Boardman's Selections, Philadelphia, U.S., 1861; Lyra Eucharistica, 1863 and 1864, &c. The translations of st. i.-iii., v., reduced to 6 8's, and beginning, "Here is my heart, I give it Thee," were included in the American Sabbath Hymn Book, 1858; and, repeated, omitting st. ii., in the Christian Hymn Book, Cincinnati, 1865. iv. So bringen wir den Leib zur Ruh. Burial. 1774, p. 204, in 12 st., entitled, "At the burial of a corpse." In the Bavarian Gesang-Buch., 1854, No. 229, beginning "Nun bringen wir." Translated as, "This body, weary and distressed," by Dr. H. Harbaugh, in the German Reformed Guardian, June, 1863, p. 187. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Hans Kugelmann

1495 - 1542 Person Name: H. Kugelmann Matching Instances: 1 Composer of "HALLE" in The Church Hymnal

Edwin Edwards

Matching Instances: 1 Composer of "FOR HOWE" in The Pilgrim Hymnal

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