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Text Identifier:"^thou_whose_almighty_word$"

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Let There Be Light

Author: John Marriott Meter: 6.6.4.6.6.6.4 Appears in 436 hymnals First Line: Thou, whose almighty word

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ITALIAN HYMN

Composer: Felice de Giardini (1716-1796); David Evans (1874-1948) Meter: 6.6.4.6.6.6.4 Appears in 1,057 hymnals Tune Sources: Harmony adapted Church Hymnary, Fourth Edition, 2005 Tune Key: G Major Incipit: 53121 71123 45432 Used With Text: God, whose almighty word
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DORT

Composer: Lowell Mason Meter: 6.6.4.6.6.6.4 Appears in 96 hymnals Tune Key: C Major Incipit: 13365 57523 21765 Used With Text: Thou, Whose Almighty Word
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TRINITY

Composer: W. R. Braine Appears in 31 hymnals Incipit: 33322 15536 711 Used With Text: Thou, Whose Almighty Word

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Thou, Whose Almighty Word

Author: John Marriott Hymnal: American Lutheran Hymnal #111 (1930) Meter: 6.6.4.6.6.6.4 Lyrics: 1 Thou, whose almighty Word Chaos and darkness heard, And took their flight; Hear us, we humbly pray; And where the Gospel day Sheds not its glorious ray, Let there be light! 2 Thou, Who didst come to bring On Thy redeeming wing Healing and sight; Health to the sick in mind, Sight to the inly blind, O now to all mankind, Let there be light! 3 Spirit of truth and love, Life-giving Holy Dove, Speed forth Thy flight; Move on the waters' face, Bearing the lamp of grace, And in earth's darkest place Let there be light! 4 Holy and blessed Three, Glorious Trinity, Wisdom, Love, Might; Boundless as ocean's tide, Rolling in fullest pride, Thro' the earth, far and wide, Let there be light! Amen. Topics: The Means of Grace Missions Languages: English Tune Title: THOU, WHOSE ALMIGHTY WORD
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Thou, Whose almighty word

Author: Rev. John Marriott Hymnal: The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged, as adopted by the General Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America in the year of our Lord 1892 #327 (1894) Meter: 6.6.4.6.6.6.4 Lyrics: 1 Thou, Whose almighty word Chaos and darkness heard, And took their flight; Hear us, we humbly pray, And, where the Gospel day Sheds not its glorious ray, Let there be light! 2 Thou Who didst come to bring On Thy redeeming wing Healing and sight, Health to the sick in mind, Sight to the inly-blind, Oh, now, to all mankind Let there be light! 3 Spirit of truth and love, Life-giving, holy Dove, Speed forth Thy flight! Move on the waters' face Bearing the lamp of grace, And, in earth's darkest place Let there be light! 4 Holy and blessèd Three, Glorious Trinity, Wisdom, Love, Might; Boundless as ocean's tide, Rolling in fullest pride Through the world, far and wide, Let there be light! Amen. Topics: General; Intercession for the Church Languages: English Tune Title: [Thou, Whose almighty word]
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Thou whose Almighty Word

Author: John Marriott Hymnal: The Calvary Hymnal #26 (1891) Languages: English Tune Title: [Thou whose almighty word]

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George H. Trebel

Person Name: G. H. Trebel Composer of "THOU, WHOSE ALMIGHTY WORD" in American Lutheran Hymnal

William F. Sherwin

1826 - 1888 Composer of "CUTTING" in The New Christian Hymnal Sherwin, William Fisk, an American Baptist, was born at Buckland, Massachusetts, March 14,1826. His educational opportunities, so far as schools were concerned, were few, but he made excellent use of his time and surroundings. At fifteen he went to Boston and studied music under Dr. Mason: In due course he became a teacher of vocal music, and held several important appointments in Massachusetts; in Hudson and Albany, New York County, and then in New York City. Taking special interest in Sunday Schools, he composed carols and hymn-tunes largely for their use, and was associated with the Rev. R. Lowry and others in preparing Bright Jewels, and other popular Sunday School hymn and tune books. A few of his melodies are known in Great Britain through I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, where they are given with his signature. His hymnwriting was limited. The following pieces are in common use:— 1. Grander than ocean's story (1871). The Love of God. 2. Hark, bark, the merry Christmas bells. Christmas Carol. 3. Lo, the day of God is breaking. The Spiritual Warfare. 4. Wake the song of joy and gladness. Sunday School or Temperance Anniversary. 5. Why is thy faith, 0 Child of God, so small. Safety in Jesus. Mr. Sherwin died at Boston, Massachusetts, April 14, 1888. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Sherwin, W. F., p. 1055, i. Another hymn from his Bright Jewels, 1869, p. 68, is "Sound the battle cry" (Christian Courage), in the Sunday School Hymnary, 1905, and several other collections. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Lowell Mason

1792 - 1872 Composer of "DORT" in The Cyber Hymnal Dr. Lowell Mason (the degree was conferred by the University of New York) is justly called the father of American church music; and by his labors were founded the germinating principles of national musical intelligence and knowledge, which afforded a soil upon which all higher musical culture has been founded. To him we owe some of our best ideas in religious church music, elementary musical education, music in the schools, the popularization of classical chorus singing, and the art of teaching music upon the Inductive or Pestalozzian plan. More than that, we owe him no small share of the respect which the profession of music enjoys at the present time as contrasted with the contempt in which it was held a century or more ago. In fact, the entire art of music, as now understood and practiced in America, has derived advantage from the work of this great man. Lowell Mason was born in Medfield, Mass., January 8, 1792. From childhood he had manifested an intense love for music, and had devoted all his spare time and effort to improving himself according to such opportunities as were available to him. At the age of twenty he found himself filling a clerkship in a banking house in Savannah, Ga. Here he lost no opportunity of gratifying his passion for musical advancement, and was fortunate to meet for the first time a thoroughly qualified instructor, in the person of F. L. Abel. Applying his spare hours assiduously to the cultivation of the pursuit to which his passion inclined him, he soon acquired a proficiency that enabled him to enter the field of original composition, and his first work of this kind was embodied in the compilation of a collection of church music, which contained many of his own compositions. The manuscript was offered unavailingly to publishers in Philadelphia and in Boston. Fortunately for our musical advancement it finally secured the attention of the Boston Handel and Haydn Society, and by its committee was submitted to Dr. G. K. Jackson, the severest critic in Boston. Dr. Jackson approved most heartily of the work, and added a few of his own compositions to it. Thus enlarged, it was finally published in 1822 as The Handel and Haydn Society Collection of Church Music. Mason's name was omitted from the publication at his own request, which he thus explains, "I was then a bank officer in Savannah, and did not wish to be known as a musical man, as I had not the least thought of ever making music a profession." President Winchester, of the Handel and Haydn Society, sold the copyright for the young man. Mr. Mason went back to Savannah with probably $500 in his pocket as the preliminary result of his Boston visit. The book soon sprang into universal popularity, being at once adopted by the singing schools of New England, and through this means entering into the church choirs, to whom it opened up a higher field of harmonic beauty. Its career of success ran through some seventeen editions. On realizing this success, Mason determined to accept an invitation to come to Boston and enter upon a musical career. This was in 1826. He was made an honorary member of the Handel and Haydn Society, but declined to accept this, and entered the ranks as an active member. He had been invited to come to Boston by President Winchester and other musical friends and was guaranteed an income of $2,000 a year. He was also appointed, by the influence of these friends, director of music at the Hanover, Green, and Park Street churches, to alternate six months with each congregation. Finally he made a permanent arrangement with the Bowdoin Street Church, and gave up the guarantee, but again friendly influence stepped in and procured for him the position of teller at the American Bank. In 1827 Lowell Mason became president and conductor of the Handel and Haydn Society. It was the beginning of a career that was to win for him as has been already stated the title of "The Father of American Church Music." Although this may seem rather a bold claim it is not too much under the circumstances. Mr. Mason might have been in the average ranks of musicianship had he lived in Europe; in America he was well in advance of his surroundings. It was not too high praise (in spite of Mason's very simple style) when Dr. Jackson wrote of his song collection: "It is much the best book I have seen published in this country, and I do not hesitate to give it my most decided approbation," or that the great contrapuntist, Hauptmann, should say the harmonies of the tunes were dignified and churchlike and that the counterpoint was good, plain, singable and melodious. Charles C. Perkins gives a few of the reasons why Lowell Mason was the very man to lead American music as it then existed. He says, "First and foremost, he was not so very much superior to the members as to be unreasonably impatient at their shortcomings. Second, he was a born teacher, who, by hard work, had fitted himself to give instruction in singing. Third, he was one of themselves, a plain, self-made man, who could understand them and be understood of them." The personality of Dr. Mason was of great use to the art and appreciation of music in this country. He was of strong mind, dignified manners, sensitive, yet sweet and engaging. Prof. Horace Mann, one of the great educators of that day, said he would walk fifty miles to see and hear Mr. Mason teach if he could not otherwise have that advantage. Dr. Mason visited a number of the music schools in Europe, studied their methods, and incorporated the best things in his own work. He founded the Boston Academy of Music. The aim of this institution was to reach the masses and introduce music into the public schools. Dr. Mason resided in Boston from 1826 to 1851, when he removed to New York. Not only Boston benefited directly by this enthusiastic teacher's instruction, but he was constantly traveling to other societies in distant cities and helping their work. He had a notable class at North Reading, Mass., and he went in his later years as far as Rochester, where he trained a chorus of five hundred voices, many of them teachers, and some of them coming long distances to study under him. Before 1810 he had developed his idea of "Teachers' Conventions," and, as in these he had representatives from different states, he made musical missionaries for almost the entire country. He left behind him no less than fifty volumes of musical collections, instruction books, and manuals. As a composer of solid, enduring church music. Dr. Mason was one of the most successful this country has introduced. He was a deeply pious man, and was a communicant of the Presbyterian Church. Dr. Mason in 1817 married Miss Abigail Gregory, of Leesborough, Mass. The family consisted of four sons, Daniel Gregory, Lowell, William and Henry. The two former founded the publishing house of Mason Bros., dissolved by the death of the former in 19G9. Lowell and Henry were the founders of the great organ manufacturer of Mason & Hamlin. Dr. William Mason was one of the most eminent musicians that America has yet produced. Dr. Lowell Mason died at "Silverspring," a beautiful residence on the side of Orange Mountain, New Jersey, August 11, 1872, bequeathing his great musical library, much of which had been collected abroad, to Yale College. --Hall, J. H. (c1914). Biographies of Gospel Song and Hymn Writers. New York: Fleming H. Revell Company.



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