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Carolina Sandell

1823 - 1903 Person Name: Lina Sandell Hymnal Number: 141 Author of "Children of the Heavenly Father" in Yes, Lord! Caroline W. Sandell Berg (b. Froderyd, Sweden, 1832; d. Stockholm, Sweden, 1903), is better known as Lina Sandell, the "Fanny Crosby of Sweden." "Lina" Wilhelmina Sandell Berg was the daughter of a Lutheran pastor to whom she was very close; she wrote hymns partly to cope with the fact that she witnessed his tragic death by drowning. Many of her 650 hymns were used in the revival services of Carl O. Rosenius, and a number of them gained popularity particularly because of the musical settings written by gospel singer Oskar Ahnfelt. Jenny Lind, the famous Swedish soprano, underwrote the cost of publishing a collection of Ahnfelt's music, Andeliga Sänger (1850), which consisted mainly of Berg's hymn texts. Bert Polman

Vernon J. Charlesworth

1838 - 1915 Hymnal Number: 143 Author of "A Shelter in the Time of Storm" in Yes, Lord! Charlesworth, Vernon J. , was born at Barking, Essex, on April 28, 1839, and educated at Homerton College. In 1864 he became co-pastor with the Rev. Newman Hall at the old Surrey Chapel, and in 1869 the Head Master of Mr. Spurgeon's Stockwell Orphan¬age. Mr. Charlesworth has published The Life of Rowland Hill, &c, 1876, and, in co-operation with Mr. J. Manton Smith, Flowers and Fruits of Sacred Song and Evangelistic Hymns. To this work he contributed:— 1. As you gather round the family board. Plea for Orphans. 2. Blessed Jesus, Lord and Master. Conferences. 3. Come, brethren, let us sing. Praise to God. 4. Come to Jesus, He invites you. Invitation. 5. Heart to heart by love united. Holy Matrimony. 6. How blest in Jesus' name to meet. Praise to Jesus. 7. Our lamps are gone out, and the daylight is past. The Foolish Virgins. 8. Sweetest fellowship we know. Walking in the Light. 9. The day of the Lord is at hand. Advent. 10. There is a land as yet unknown. Heaven. 11. 'Tis a blessed thing while we live to sing. Praise. 12. When far from Thee, and heirs of woe. Grace. 13. Ye servants of Jesus, go forth. Missions. In addition to these hymns, Mr. Charlesworth contributed— 14. I've nothing to bring Thee, Jesus. Lent. to Fullerton & Smith's Evangelical Echoes, 1884, and has printed a considerable number as leaflets. Two of the most recent, "As the eastern hills are glowing" (Morning), and "Lengthening shadows darkly falling" (Evening), should find their way into common use. Mr. Charlesworth's hymns are very spirited and of a popular character. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Ira David Sankey

1840 - 1908 Person Name: Ira D. Sankey Hymnal Number: 143 Adapter of "A Shelter in the Time of Storm" in Yes, Lord! Sankey, Ira David, was born in Edinburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1840, of Methodist parents. About 1856 he removed with his parents to New Castle, Pennsylvania, where he became a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Four years afterwards he became the Superintendent of a large Sunday School in which he commenced his career of singing sacred songs and solos. Mr. Moody met with him and heard him sing at the International Convention of the Young Men's Christian Association, at Indianapolis, and through Mr. Moody's persuasion he joined him in his work at Chicago. After some two or three years' work in Chicago, they sailed for England on June 7, 1872, and held their first meeting at York a short time afterwards, only eight persons being present. Their subsequent work in Great Britain and America is well known. Mr. Sankey's special duty was the singing of sacred songs and solos at religious gatherings, a practice which was in use in America for some time before he adopted it. His volume of Sacred Songs and Solos is a compilation from various sources, mainly American and mostly in use before. Although known as Sankey and Moody’s Songs, only one song, "Home at last, thy labour done" is by Mr. Sankey, and not one is by Mr. Moody. Mr. Sankey supplied several of the melodies. The English edition of the Sacred Songs & Solos has had an enormous sale; and the work as a whole is very popular for Home Mission services. The Songs have been translated into several languages. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Pseudonymns: Harry S. Low­er Rian A. Dykes ==================== Sankey, I. D., p. 994, i. During the past fifteen years Mr. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos have had a very large sale, which has justified him in increasing the number of songs and hymns, including " New Hymns and Solos," to 1200. In 1906 he published My Life and Sacred Songs (London : Morgan & Scott). In addition to the "Story of his Own Life," the work contains an account of the most popular of his solos, with interesting reminiscences of the spiritual awakening of many who were influenced through his singing of them in public. In this respect it corresponds in some measure with G. J. Stevenson's Methodist Hymn Book, &c, 1883 (p. 1094, i.). It is an addition to the Sacred Songs and Solos, which will be held in esteem by many. In addition to his hymn, noted on p. 994, ii., Mr. Sankey gives details of the following:— 1. Out of the shadow-land into the sunshine. [Heaven Anticipated.] Mr. Sankey's account of this hymn is:— "I wrote this hymn specially for the memorial service held for Mr. Moody in Carnegie Hall, where 1 also sang it as a solo. It is the last sacred song of which I wrote both the words and music. The idea was suggested by Mr. Moody's last words, 'Earth recedes; heaven opens before me . . . God is calling me, and I must go.' On account of its peculiar association with my fellow-labourer in the Gospel for so many years, the words are here given in full." The hymn follows on p. 185, in 3 stanzas of 4 lines and a chorus. 2. Rejoice! Rejoice! our King is coming, [Advent.] Mr. Sankey writes concerning this hymn:— "During one of my trips to Great Britain on the SS. City of Rome a storm raged on the sea. The wind was howling through the rigging, and waves like mountains of foam were breaking over the bow of the vessel. A great fear had fallen upon the passengers. When the storm was at its worst, we all thought we might soon go to the bottom of the sea. The conviction came to me that the Lord would be with us iu the trying hour, and sitting down in the reading room, I composed this hymn. Before reaching England the tune had formed itself in my mind, and on arriving in London I wrote it out, and had it published in Sacred Songs and Solos, where it is No. 524 in the edition. of 1888. From Mr. Sankey's autobiographical sketch we gather that he was born at Edinburgh, in Western Pennsylvania, Aug. 28, 1840, joined Mr. Moody in 1871, and visited England for the first time in 1873. The original of the Sacred Songs, &c, of 23 pieces only, was offered as a gift to the London publishers of P. Phillips's Hallowed Song, and declined by them. It was subsequently accepted by Mr. K. O. Morgan, of Morgan & Scott, and is now a volume of 1200 hymns. From a return kindly sent us by Messrs. Morgan & Scott, we find that the various issues of the Sacred Songs and Solos were:— In 1873, 24 pp.; 1874, 72 pp. ; 1876, 153 hymns; 1877, 271 hymns; 1881, 441 hymns; 1888, 750 hymns; 1903, 1200 hymns. In addition, The Christian Choir, which is generally associated with the Sacred Songs and Solos, was issued in 1884 with 75 hymns, and in 1896 with 281. The New Hymns & Solos, by the same firm, were published in 1888. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Sanford Fillmore Bennett

1836 - 1898 Person Name: Sanford F. Bennett Hymnal Number: 161 Author of "Sweet By and By" in Yes, Lord! Sanford Fillmore Bennett was born in Eden, New York, 21 June 1836. He and his parents moved to Plainfield, Illinois when he was two years old. He worked on the farm and attended district school during the winter. He was a voracious reader. At sixteen he entered Waukegon Academy. Two years later he began teaching at Wauconda. In 1858 he entered the University of Michigan, Afterward he had charge of the schools in Richmond, Illinois. Two years later he resigned and became Associate Editor of the Independent at Elkhorn, Wisconsin. In 1864 he enlisted in the Wisconsin Volunteers and served as Second Lieutenant. After the war he returned to Elkhorn and opened a drug store and began the study of medicine. He graduated from Rush Medical College in 1874. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Samuel Stennett

1727 - 1795 Hymnal Number: 165 Author of "I Am Bound for the Promised Land" in Yes, Lord! Samuel Stennett was born at Exeter, in 1727. His father was pastor of a Baptist congregation in that city; afterwards of the Baptist Chapel, Little Wild Street, London. In this latter pastorate the son succeeded the father in 1758. He died in 1795. Dr. Stennett was the author of several doctrinal works, and a few hymns. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ====================== Stennett, Samuel, D.D., grandson of Joseph Stennett, named above, and son of the Rev. Joseph Stennett, D.D., was born most pro;bably in 1727, at Exeter, where his father was at that time a Baptist minister. When quite young he removed to London, his father having become pastor of the Baptist Church in Little Wild Street, Lincoln's Inn Fields. In 1748, Samuel Stennett became assistant to his father in the ministry, and in 1758 succeeded him in the pastoral office at Little Wild Street. From that time until his death, on Aug. 24, 1795, he held a very prominent position among the Dissenting ministers of London. He was much respected by some of the statesmen of the time, and used his influence with them in support of the principles of religious freedom. The celebrated John Howard was a member of his congregation and an attached friend. In 1763, the University of Aberdeen conferred on him the degree of D.D. Dr. S. Stennett's prose publications consist of volumes of sermons, and pamphlets on Baptism and on Nonconformist Disabilities. He wrote one or two short poems, and contributed 38 hymns to the collection of his friend, Dr. Rippon (1787). His poetical genius was not of the highest order, and his best hymns have neither the originality nor the vigour of some of his grandfather's. The following, however, are pleasing in sentiment and expression, and are in common use more especially in Baptist congregations:— 1. And have I, Christ, no love for Thee? Love for Christ desired. 2. And will the offended God again? The Body the Temple of the Holy Ghost. 3. As on the Cross the Saviour hung. The Thief on the Cross. 4. Behold the leprous Jew. The healing of the Leper. 5. Come, every pious heart. Praise to Christ. 6. Father, at Thy call, I come. Lent. 7. Great God, amid the darksome night. God, a Sun. 8. Great God, what hosts of angels stand. Ministry of Angels. 9. Here at Thy Table, Lord, we meet. Holy Communion. 10. How charming is the place. Public Worship. 11. How shall the sons of men appear? Acceptance through Christ alone. 12. How soft the words my [the] Saviour speaks. Early Piety. 13. How various and how new. Divine Providence. 14. Not all the nobles of the earth. Christians as Sons of God. 15. On Jordan's stormy banks I stand. Heaven anticipated. 16. Prostrate, dear Jesus, at thy feet. Lent. Sometimes, "Dear Saviour, prostrate at Thy feet." 17. Should bounteous nature kindly pour. The greatest of these is Love. From this, "Had I the gift of tongues," st. iii., is taken. 18. Thy counsels of redeeming grace. Holy Scripture. From "Let avarice, from shore to shore." 19. Thy life 1 read, my dearest Lord. Death in Infancy. From this "'Tis Jesus speaks, I fold, says He." 20. 'Tis finished! so the Saviour cried. Good Friday. 21. To Christ, the Lord, let every tongue. Praise of Christ. From this,"Majestic sweetness sits enthroned," st. iii., is taken. 22. To God, my Saviour, and my King. Renewing Grace. 23. To God, the universal King. Praise to God. 24. What wisdom, majesty, and grace. The Gospel. Sometimes, “What majesty and grace." 25. Where two or three with sweet accord. Before the Sermon. 26. Why should a living man complain? Affliction. From this, "Lord, see what floods of sorrow rise," st. iii., is taken. 27. With tears of anguish I lament. Lent. 28. Yonder amazing sight I see. Good Friday. All these hymns, with others by Stennett, were given in Rippon's Baptist Selection, 1787, a few having previously appeared in A Collection of Hymns for the use of Christians of all Denominations, London. Printed for the Booksellers, 1782; and No. 16, in the 1778 Supplement to the 3rd edition of the Bristol Baptist Selection of Ash and Evans. The whole of Stennett's poetical pieces and hymns were included in vol. ii. of his Works, together with a Memoir, by W. J. Jones. 4 vols., 1824. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

E. E. Hewitt

1851 - 1920 Person Name: Eliza E. Hewitt Hymnal Number: 170 Author of "When We All Get to Heaven" in Yes, Lord! Pseudonym: Li­die H. Ed­munds. Eliza Edmunds Hewitt was born in Philadelphia 28 June 1851. She was educated in the public schools and after graduation from high school became a teacher. However, she developed a spinal malady which cut short her career and made her a shut-in for many years. During her convalescence, she studied English literature. She felt a need to be useful to her church and began writing poems for the primary department. she went on to teach Sunday school, take an active part in the Philadelphia Elementary Union and become Superintendent of the primary department of Calvin Presbyterian Church. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

M. A. Kidder

1820 - 1905 Person Name: Mary A. Kidder Hymnal Number: 173 Author of "Is My Name Written There?" in Yes, Lord! Used pseudonym: Minnie Waters ========== Mary Ann Pepper Kidder USA 1820-1905. Born at Boston, MA, she was a poet, writing from an early age. She went blind at age 16, but miraculously recovered her sight the following year. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1844 she married Ellis Usher Kidder, a music publisher, working for the firm founded by his brother, Andrew, and they had three children: Mary Frances, Edward, and Walter. That year they moved to Charlestown, MA, and in 1857 to New York City. When the American Civil War broke out, Ellis enlisted in the 4th Regiment as a private. Mustered in for two years of service, he died of disease in 1862, six days after participating in the Battle of Antietam. Left alone, with three children to care for, her writing hobby became a much needed source of income. She began writing short stories, poems, and articles and submitting them to various magazines and newspapers. For over 25 years she wrote a poem each week to the New York Ledger and others to the Waverly Magazine and New York Fireside Companion. She also frequently contributed to the New York Weekly, Demorest’s Monthly, and Packard’s Monthly. It was estimated that she earned over $80,000 from her verse. She lost two of her children when Walter drowned while swimming, and 18 years later, her daughter, Mary Frances, a talented sketch artist, died of heart disease. Mary Ann was active in the temperance movement and one of the first members of the Sorosis club, a women’s club. She loved children and animals. Her daughter-in-law described her as gentle, patient, always serene, and a good listener. She was fiercely independent and refused to lean on others for support, mentally or materially. Mary Ann lived for 46 years in New York City. She is said to have written 1000+ hymn lyrics. She died at Chelsea, MA, at the home of her brother, Daniel, having lived there two years. It is said that her jet-black hair never turned gray, which was a real grief to her, as she longed for that in advancing age. John Perry =========== Kidder, Mary Ann, née Pepper, who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, March 16, 1820, is the author of "Lord, I care not for riches" (Name in the Book of Life desired), and "We shall sleep, but not for ever" (Hope of the Resurrection), both of which are in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, 1878. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ===================== Kidder, Mary Ann, née Pepper, p. 1576, i. Mrs. Kidder died at Chelsea, Mass., Nov. 25, 1905. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and resided for 46 years in New York City. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Carrie Ellis Breck

1855 - 1934 Person Name: Carrie E. Breck Hymnal Number: 174 Author of "Face to Face" in Yes, Lord! Carrie Ellis Breck was born 22 January 1855 in Vermont and raised in a Christian home. She later moved to Vineland, New Jersy, and then to Portland, Oregon. She wrote verse and prose for religious and household publications, In 1884 she married Frank A. Breck. She has written between fourteen and fifteen hundred hymns. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916) See also Mrs. Frank A. Breck.

Judson W. Van DeVenter

1855 - 1939 Person Name: J. W. Van DeVenter Hymnal Number: 180 Author of "Looking This Way" in Yes, Lord! Judson W. Van DeVenter was born 15 December 1855 on a farm near the village of Dundee, Michigan. He was educated in the country and village schools, and at Hillsdale College. He later moved to St. Petersburg, Florida. He wrote about 100 hymns. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Francis Bottome

1823 - 1894 Person Name: Frank Bottome Hymnal Number: 190 Author of "The Comforter Has Come" in Yes, Lord! Bottome, F., S.T.D., was born in Derbyshire, England, May 26, 1823. In 1850, having removed to America, he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopalian Church; and in 1872 he received the degree of S.T.D. from Dickinson's College, Carlisle, Penn. In addition to assisting in the compilation of B. P. Smith's Gospel Hymns, London, 1872: Centenary Singer, 1869; Hound Lake, 1872, he has written:— 1. Come, Holy Ghost, all sacred fire. Invocation of the Holy Spirit. Appeared in R. P. Smith's Gospel Hymns, 1872. It is in several collections, including the Ohio Hymn Book of the Evangelical Association, 1881, No. 364. 2. Full salvation, full salvation. Joy of full Salvation. Written in 1871, and published in a collection by Dr. Cullis of Boston, 1873. Also in the Ohio Hymn Book, 1881, No. 384. 3. Love of Jesus, all divine. Love of Jesus. Written in 1872, and published in his Hound Lake, 1872. It is in several collections. 4. O bliss of the purified, bliss of the free. Sanctification. Written in 1869, and published in the Revivalist, and numerous hymn-books in America, including the Ohio Hymn Book as above, 1881, No. 477, &c. His hymns, "Sweet rest in Jesus"; and "Oneness in Jesus," are also found in several collections for evangelistic services. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

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