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Eleanor Hull

1860 - 1935 Person Name: Eleanor H. Hull Hymnal Number: 484 Versifier of "Be Thou My Vision" in The Cyber Hymnal

W. Chatterton Dix

1837 - 1898 Person Name: William C. Dix Hymnal Number: 252 Author of "Alleluia! Sing to Jesus!" in The Cyber Hymnal Most British hymn writers in the nineteenth century were clergymen, but William C. Dix (b. Bristol, England, 1837; d. Cheddar, Somerset, England, 1898) was a notable exception. Trained in the business world, he became the manager of a marine insurance company in Glasgow, Scotland. Dix published various volumes of his hymns, such as Hymns of Love and Joy (1861) and Altar Songs: Verses on the Holy Eucharist (1867). A number of his texts were first published in Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861). Bert Polman ======================== Dix, William Chatterton, son of John Dix, surgeon, of Bristol, author of the Life of Chatterton; Local Legends, &c, born at Bristol, June 14, 1837, and educated at the Grammar School of that city. Mr. Chatterton Dix's contributions to modern hymnody are numerous and of value. His fine Epiphany hymn, "As with gladness men of old,” and his plaintive ”Come unto Me, ye weary," are examples of his compositions, many of which rank high amongst modern hymns. In his Hymns of Love and Joy, 1861, Altar Songs, Verses on the Holy Eucharist, 1867; Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871; and Seekers of a City, 1878, some of his compositions were first published. The greater part, however, were contributed to Hymns Ancient & Modern; St. Raphaels Hymnbook, 1861; Lyra Eucharidica, 1863; Lyra Messianica, 1864; Lyra Mystica, 1865; The People's Hymns, 1867; The Hymnary, 1872; Church Hymns, 1871, and others. Many of his contributions are renderings in metrical form of Dr. Littledale's translation from the Greek in his Offices . . . of the Holy Eastern Church, 1863; and of the Rev. J. M. Rodwell's translation of hymns of the Abyssinian Church. These renderings of the "songs of other Churches" have not received the attention they deserve, and the sources from whence they come are practically unknown to most hymnal compilers. Mr. Dix has also written many Christmas and Easter carols, the most widely known of which is "The Manger Throne."   In addition to detached pieces in prose and verse for various magazines, he has published two devotional works, Light; and The Risen Life, 1883; and a book of instructions for children entitled The Pattern Life, 1885. The last-named contains original hymns by Mr. Dix not given elsewhere. In addition to the more important of Mr. Dix's hymns which are annotated under their respective first lines, the following are also in common use:- 1. God cometh, let the heart prepare.  Advent. In his Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871.      2. Holy, holy, holy, to Thee our vows we pay.  Holy Communion.   Published in his Altar Songs, 1867, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, and headed "Eucharistic Processional for Dedication Feast."    In the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871, and others in an abridged form.      3. How long, O Lord, how long, we ask.   Second Advent.   Appeared in the Appendix to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Psalms & Hymns, 1869, and repeated in several collections.        4. In our work and in our play.    Children's Hymn. Published in his Hymns and Carols for Children, 1869, and is largely adopted  in  children's  hymnbooks, as  Mrs. Brock's Children's Hymnbook, 1881, and others.   Also in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871.      5.  In the hollow of Thine hand.   For Fair Weather. Appeared in the People's Hymns, 1867, and repeated in several others.      6.  Joy fills our inmost heart today.    Christmas. Printed in the Church Times, and  then on a Flysheet by Gr. J. Palmer, as the third of Four Joyful Hymns for Christmas, circa 1865. It is in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871, and other hymnals. It is also one of Mr. Dix's Christmas Customs & Christmas Carols, not dated.      7. Lift up your songs, ye thankful.   St. Ambrose. Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.  8. Now in numbers softly flowing.    St. Cecilia. Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.    9.  Now, our Father, we adore Thee.   Praise to the Father.   Appeared in the Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns, 1869.   10.  O Christ, Thou Son of Mary.   St. Crispin.   First printed in the Union Review, Sept., 1866, and thence into the People's Hymns, 1887.   11. O Cross which only canst allay.   Glorying and Trusting in the Cross.   Published in the People's Hymns, 1867.   12. O Thou the Eternal Son of God.   Good Friday. Appeared in Lyra Messianica, 1864; the author's Hymns and Carols for Children, 1869; the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns, 1871, &c.   13. On the waters dark and drear.   For use at Sea. Published in Hymns for Public Worship, &c. (St. Raphael's, Bristol), 1861; the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns, 1871, &c.   14. Only one prayer to-day.   Ash Wednesday.   Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.   15. Sitting at receipt of custom.  St. Matthew.  Appeared in the People's Hymns, 1867.   16. The Cross is on thy brow.   Confirmation.   In the 1869 Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns.   17.  The stars above our head.   Work and Humility. In the 1869 Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns.  18. When the shades of night are falling.   Evening Hymn to the Good Shepherd.   In the author's Seekers of a City, &c. [1878]. Most of Mr. Dix's best-known hymns, and also some of those named above, are in common use in America and other English-speaking countries. In Great Britain and America from 30 to 40 are in common use.  He died Sept. 9, 1898. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ====================== Dix, William Chatterton, p. 302, ii. Additional hymns by Mr. Dix now in common use are:— 1. Lift up your songs, ye angel choirs. Ascension. 2. Now, my soul rehearse the story. Christ Feeding the Multitude. 3. Within the temple's hallowed courts. Blessed Virgin Mary. These hymns are from his Altar Songs, 1867. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Caroline M. Noel

1817 - 1877 Hymnal Number: 300 Author of "At the Name of Jesus" in The Cyber Hymnal Caroline Marie Noel (b. Teston, Kent, England, 1817; d. St. Marylebone, London, England, 1877) The daughter of an Anglican clergyman and hymn writer, she began to write poetry in her late teens but then abandoned it until she was in her forties. During those years she suffered frequent bouts of illness and eventually became an invalid. To encourage both herself and others who were ill or incapacitated, Noel began to write devotional verse again. Her poems were collected in The Name of Jesus and Other Verses for the Sick and Lonely (1861, enlarged in 1870). Bert Polman ================ Noel, Caroline Maria, daughter of the Hon. Gerard T. Noel (p. 809, ii.), and niece of the Hon. Baptist W. Noel, was born in London, April 10, 1817, and died at 39 Great Cumberland Place, Hyde Park, Dec. 7, 1877. Her first hymn, "Draw nigh unto my soul" (Indwelling), was written when she was 17. During the next three years she wrote about a dozen pieces: from 20 years of age to 40 she wrote nothing; and during the next 20 years the rest of her pieces were written. The first edition of her compositions was published as The Name of Jesus and Other Verses for the Sick and Lonely, in 1861. This was enlarged from time to time, and its title subsequently changed by the publishers to The Name of Jesus and Other Poems. The 1878 ed. contains 78 pieces. Miss Noel, in common with Miss Charlotte Elliott, was a great sufferer, and many of these verses were the outcome of her days of pain. They are specially adapted "for the Sick and Lonely" and were written rather for private meditation than for public use, although several are suited to the latter purpose. Her best known hymn is the Processional for Ascension Day, "At the Name of Jesus." It is in the enlarged edition of The Name of Jesus, &c, 1870, p. 59, and is dated 1870 by her family. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy

1809 - 1847 Person Name: Felix Mendelssohn Hymnal Number: 2384 Composer of "MENDELSSOHN" in The Cyber Hymnal Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (b. Hamburg, Germany, 1809; d. Leipzig, Germany, 1847) was the son of banker Abraham Mendelssohn and the grandson of philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. His Jewish family became Christian and took the Bartholdy name (name of the estate of Mendelssohn's uncle) when baptized into the Lutheran church. The children all received an excellent musical education. Mendelssohn had his first public performance at the age of nine and by the age of sixteen had written several symphonies. Profoundly influenced by J. S. Bach's music, he conducted a performance of the St. Matthew Passion in 1829 (at age 20!) – the first performance since Bach's death, thus reintroducing Bach to the world. Mendelssohn organized the Domchor in Berlin and founded the Leipzig Conservatory of Music in 1843. Traveling widely, he not only became familiar with various styles of music but also became well known himself in countries other than Germany, especially in England. He left a rich treasury of music: organ and piano works, overtures and incidental music, oratorios (including St. Paul or Elijah and choral works, and symphonies. He harmonized a number of hymn tunes himself, but hymnbook editors also arranged some of his other tunes into hymn tunes. Bert Polman

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

1756 - 1791 Person Name: Wolfgang Mozart, 1756-1791 Hymnal Number: 3100 Composer (attributed to) of "ELLESDIE" in The Cyber Hymnal Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Austria 1756-1791. Born at Salzburg, Austria, the son of Leopold Mozart, a minor composer and violinist, and youngest of seven children, he showed amazing ability on violin and keyboard from earliest childhood, even starting to compose music at age four when his father would play a piece and Mozart would play it exactly as did his father. At five, he composed some of his own music, which he played to his father, who wrote it down. When Mozart was eight, he wrote his first symphony, probably transcribed by his father. In his early years his father was his only teacher, teaching his children languages and academic subjects, as well as fundamentals of their strict Catholic faith. Some of his early compositions came as a surprise to his father, who eventually gave up composing himself when he realized how talented his son was. His family made several European journeys and he and his sister, Nanneri, performed as child prodigies, at the court of Prince-elector Maximillian II of Bavaria in Munich, and at the Imperial Courts in Vienna and Prague. A long concert tour followed, for 3.5 years, taking the family to courts in Munich, Mannheim, Paris, London, Dover, The Hague, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Mechelen, and again to Paris, and back home via Zurich, Donaueschingen, and Munich. During these trips Mozart met many musicians, acquainting himself with the works of other composers. He met Johann Christian Bach in London in 1764. Family trips were challenging, and travel conditions were primitive. They had to wait for invitations and reimbursements from nobility, and they endured long, near-fatal illnesses far from home. First Leopold (1764) got sick, then both children (1765). They traveled again to Vienna in 1767 and stayed there over a year. After a year back in Salzburg, Leopold and Wolfgang went to Italy (1769-1771), Leopold wished to display his son’s abilities as a performer and maturing composer. In Bologna, Italy, Wolfgang was accepted as a member of the famous Academia Filamonica. In Rome he heard Gregorio Allegri’s Miserere twice in performance. Back in the Sistine Chapel, Mozart wrote the whole performance out from memory, thus producing the first unauthorized copy of this closely guarded property of the Vatican. In the next few years Mozart wrote several operas performed with success in Italy, but his father’s hopes of securing a professional appointment for his son were not realized. At age 17 he was engaged as a musician at the Salzburg court, but grew restless and traveled in search of a better position. After returning to Salzburg, Mozart was employed as a court musician by the ruler of Salzburg, Prince Archbishop Hieronymus Colloredo. This gave Mozart ample opportunity to develop relationships with other musicians and his admirers, resulting in his development of new symphonies, sonatas, string quartets, masses, serenades, and some minor operas. In 1775 he wrote his only violin concertos, five in all. Again, he was discontent with work in Salzburg and traveled to find more opportunity to write operas. He and his father again visited Munich and Vienna, but neither visit was successful with the exception of his opera ‘La finta giardiniera’ in Munich. In 1777 he resigned his Salzburg position and went to Augsburg, Mannheim, Paris, and Munich again. In Mannheim he met and fell in love with Aloysia Weber, one of four daughters of a musical family. He could find no real employment there and left for Paris in 1778. He might have had a position as organist at Versailles, but he was not interested in that. He fell into debt and started pawning valuables. During these events his mother died. Meanwhile his father was still trying to find him a position in Salzburg. After checking out several other European cities and Munich, he again encountered Aloysia, but she was no longer interested in him, so he returned to Salzburg, having written another symphony, concerto, and piano sonata, and took the new appointment his father had found. However, he was still in discontent. Visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He wrote another opera, ‘Idomeneo’, in 1781, that was successful in Munich. Two months later he was summoned to Vienna, where his employer, Archbishop Colloredo, wanted him around due to his notoriety. Mozart wished to meet the emperor and perform for him, and finally got that opportunity. It resulted in a part-time position and substantial commissions. Colloredo became a nemesis to Mozart’s career, finally releasing Mozart from his employ with a literal kick in the pants, much against his father’s wishes. However, he was now independent. Mozart then decided to settle in Vienna as a free lance performer and composer. He lived with the Fridolin Weber family, who had moved from Mannheim to Vienna. Fridolin, the father, had died, and they were taking in lodgers to make ends meet. His career there went well, and he performed as a pianist before the Emperor, establishing himself as the finest keyboard player in Vienna. He wrote another opera in 1782, again achieving success. Mozart had now become a prolific and influential composer of the Classical period and was known throughout Europe. Aloysia was now married to actor, Joseph Lange, and Mozart’s interest shifted to her sister, Constanze. In 1782 he married Constanze Weber Mozart Nissen. The marriage started out with a brief separation, and there was a problem getting Mozart’s father’s permission, which finally came. They had six children, but only two survived infancy: Carl and Franz. He lived in Vienna and achieved some notoriety, composing many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas. In 1782-83 he became intimately acquainted with Johann Sebastian Bach and George Friederic Handel, as his friend, Gottfried van Swieten, owned many manuscripts of the Baroque masters, which Mozart studied intently. He altered his style of composition as a result. That year Mozart and his wife visited his father and sister, and he composed a liturgical piece, a Mass, with a singing part for his wife. He also met Joseph Hadyn in Vienna in 1784 and they became friends. They even played together in a string quartet from time to time. Mozart wrote six quartets dedicated to Hadyn. In 1785 Hadyn told Leopold Mozart, “Your son is the greatest composer known to me by person and repute, he has taste, and what is more, the greatest skill in composition”. Over the next several years Mozart booked several piano concertos in various places as a sole performer to delighted audiences, making substantial remuneration for his work. He and his wife then adopted a more luxurious lifestyle. They moved to an expensive apartment and he bought a fine fortepiano and billiard table. They sent their son, Karl, to an expensive boarding school and also kept servants. In 1784 Mozart became a Freemason and even composed Masonic music. Over the next several years he did little operatic writing and focused on his career as a piano soloist and writer of concertos. He again began operatic collaboration in 1785, creating ‘The marriage of Figaro’, then ‘Don Giovanni’ in 1787. That year his father died. Also that year he obtained a steady post under Emperor Joseph II as his chamber composer. This was part-time employment that was important when hard times arrived. However, Joseph aimed at keeping Mozart from leaving Vienna for better work. The Austrio-Turkish War made life difficult for musicians, and his aristocracy support had declined. He moved to save on expenses, but that did not help much, and he was reduced to borrowing funds from his friends, and pleading for loans. During this period he produced his last three symphonies. In 1789 he then set up on a journey to Leipzig, Dresden, and Berlin hoping to improve his fortunes. In 1790 he was highly productive, producing concertos, an opera, ‘The magic flute’, a series of string quintets, a motet, and an (unfinished) Requiem. Finances began to improve and he begin paying back his debts. Public reaction to his works also brought him great satisfaction. In 1791, while in Prague for the premiere of his opera, ‘La clemenza di Tito’, he fell ill. He continued professional functions for a short time, but had to go home and be nursed by his wife over the next couple of months. He died at Vienna, Austria, at the age of 35, a small thin man with undistinguishing characteristics. He was buried in a modest grave, having had a small funeral. Beethoven composed his early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Hadyn wrote “posterity will not see such a talent (as Mozart) again in 100 years”. 600+ works. Side note: Mozart enjoyed billiards, dancing, and had a pet canary, a starling, a dog, and a horse for recreational riding. He liked off-color humor. He wore elegant clothing when performing and had a modest tenor voice. John Perry

C. Hubert H. Parry

1848 - 1918 Person Name: Charles Hubert Hastings Parry Hymnal Number: 5990 Composer of "RUSTINGTON" in The Cyber Hymnal Charles Hubert Hastings Parry KnBch/Brnt BMus United Kingdom 1848-1918. Born at Richmond Hill, Bournemouth, England, son of a wealthy director of the East India Company (also a painter, piano and horn musician, and art collector). His mother died of consumption shortly after his birth. His father remarried when he was three, and his stepmother favored her own children over her stepchildren, so he and two siblings were sometimes left out. He attended a preparatory school in Malvern, then at Twyford in Hampshire. He studied music from 1856-58 and became a pianist and composer. His musical interest was encouraged by the headmaster and by two organists. He gained an enduring love for Bach’s music from S S Wesley and took piano and harmony lessons from Edward Brind, who also took him to the ‘Three Choirs Festival in Hereford in 1861, where Mendelssohn, Mozart, Handel, and Beethoven works were performed. That left a great impression on Hubert. It also sparked the beginning of a lifelong association with the festival. That year, his brother was disgraced at Oxford for drug and alcohol use, and his sister, Lucy, died of consumption as well. Both events saddened Hubert. However, he began study at Eton College and distinguished himself at both sport and music. He also began having heart trouble, that would plague him the rest of his life. Eton was not known for its music program, and although some others had interest in music, there were no teachers there that could help Hubert much. He turned to George Elvey, organist of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, and started studying with him in 1863. Hubert eventually wrote some anthems for the choir of St George’s Chapel, and eventually earned his music degree. While still at Eton, Hubert sat for the Oxford Bachelor of Music exam, the youngest person ever to have done so. His exam exercise, a cantata: “O Lord, Thou hast cast us out” astonished the Heather Professor of Music, Sir Frederick Ouseley, and was triumphantly performed and published in 1867. In 1867 he left Eton and went to Exeter College, Oxford. He did not study music there, his music concerns taking second place, but read law and modern history. However, he did go to Stuttgart, Germany, at the urging of Henry Hugh Pierson, to learn re-orchestration, leaving him much more critical of Mendelssohn’s works. When he left Exeter College, at his father’s behest, he felt obliged to try insurance work, as his father considered music only a pastime (too uncertain as a profession). He became an underwriter at Lloyd’s of London, 1870-77, but he found the work unappealing to his interests and inclinations. In 1872 he married Elizabeth Maude Herbert, and they had two daughters: Dorothea and Gwendolen. His in-laws agreed with his father that a conventional career was best, but it did not suit him. He began studying advanced piano with W S Bennett, but found it insufficient. He then took lessons with Edward Dannreuther, a wise and sympathetic teacher, who taught him of Wagner’s music. At the same time as Hubert’s compositions were coming to public notice (1875), he became a scholar of George Grove and soon an assistant editor for his new “Dictionary of Music and Musicians”. He contributed 123 articles to it. His own first work appeared in 1880. In 1883 he became professor of composition and musical history at the Royal College of Music (of which Grove was the head). In 1895 Parry succeeded Grove as head of the college, remaining in the post the remainder of his life. He also succeeded John Stainer as Heather Professor of Music at the University of Oxford (1900-1908). His academic duties were considerable and likely prevented him from composing as much as he might have. However, he was rated a very fine composer, nontheless, of orchestrations, overtures, symphonies, and other music. He only attempted one opera, deemed unsuccessful. Edward Elgar learned much of his craft from Parry’s articles in Grove’s Dictionary, and from those who studied under Parry at the Royal College, including Ralph Vaughn Williams, Gustav Holst, Frank Bridge, and John Ireland. Parry had the ability when teaching music to ascertain a student’s potential for creativity and direct it positively. In 1902 he was created a Baronet of Highnam Court in Gloucester. Parry was also an avid sailor and owned several yachts, becoming a member of the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1908, the only composer so honored. He was a Darwinian and a humanist. His daughter reiterated his liberal, non-conventional thinking. On medical advice he resigned his Oxford appointment in 1908 and produced some of his best known works. He and his wife were taken up with the ‘Suffrage Movement’ in 1916. He hated to see the WW1 ravage young potential musical talent from England and Germany. In 1918 he contracted Spanish flu during the global pandemic and died at Knightsscroft, Rustington, West Sussex. In 2015 they found 70 unpublished works of Parry’s hidden away in a family archive. It is thought some may never have been performed in public. The documents were sold at auction for a large sum. Other works he wrote include: “Studies of great composers” (1886), “The art of music” (1893), “The evolution of the art of music” (1896), “The music of the 17th century” (1902). His best known work is probably his 1909 study of “Johann Sebastian Bach”. John Perry

Lewis Hartsough

1828 - 1919 Hymnal Number: 2819 Author of "I Hear Thy Welcome Voice" in The Cyber Hymnal Hartsough, Lewis, was born at Ithaca, New York, Aug. 31, 1823. Of his hymns the following are in common use:—- 1. I hear Thy welcome voice. The Divine Invitation. 2. In the rifted Rock I'm resting. Safety in Jesus. 3. Lead me to the Rock that's higher. Safety in Jesus. 4. O who'll stand up for Jesus? All for Jesus Nos. 1-3 are in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, 1878 (1 and 3 with music by Hartsough). --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ================= Hartsough, Lewis, p. 1569, ii. Mr. Hartsough entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1851, and is now (1905) residing in Mount Vernon, Indiana. He was musical editor of J. Hillman's Revivalist, Troy, 1868, and co-editor of The Sacred Harmonist, Boston, 1864, and Beulah Songs, Phila., 1879. In addition to the hymns named on p. 1569, ii., "Let me go where saints are going" [Heav'n desired] (1861) has come into common use. It appeared in W. B. Bradbury's Clarion, 1867, p. 83. Concerning his hymn, "I hear Thy welcome voice," Mr. Sankey says in his My Life and Sacred Songs, 1906, p. 11(3:— The words and music of this beautiful hymn were first published in a monthly, entitled, Guide to Holiness, a copy of which was sent to me in England. I immediately adopted it, and had it published in Sacred Songs and Solos. It proved to be one of the most helpful of the revival hymns, and was often used as an invitation hymn in England and America." [Rev. L. F. Benson, D.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ================ Hartsough, Lewis. (August 31, 1823--January 1, 1919). Details of his early life are lacking. After being admitted to the Oneida, New York, Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1851 and serving several pastorates in that state, his health failed and he went to Utah where he was influential in establishing the Utah Mission, later becoming its superintendent. Upon relinquishing that position he moved to Mt. Vernon, Iowa, where he spent the remainder of his life. Bird's statement that he lived in Indiana is erroneous. He was minister of the South Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Utica, New York, when he first became associated with Joseph Hillman, who chose him to act as musical editor of The Revivalist, a gospel hymn book which went through eleven editions in five years, 1868-1872. This book had a remarkable sale and was doubtless used in more churches during the 1870s than any other of similar character. To it the Reverend Hartsough contributed, in one edition, twelve texts, fourteen tunes, and thirty arrangements of tunes, several of the latter being of the religio-folk variety which had been so popular in the early camp meetings. It is a valuable source work. "I love to think of the heavenly land" (p.1573) is by Hartsough. "I hear thy welcome voice (p.1569), originally in six four-line stanzas, with Refrain, in full S/1931; with the first three stanzas, slightly emended, Brethren/1951; with stanzas 1, 2, 3, and 5, also emended, in Hymns of the Living Faith, 1951. Writeen in 1872 with musical settings by the author, it is the only one of his many songs which has continued in use. Source: Metcalf, Frank J. American Writers and Compilers of Sacred Music; several editions of The Revivalist. --Robert G. McCutchan, DNAH Archives

William Daman

1540 - 1591 Hymnal Number: 201 Composer of "SOUTHWELL (Daman)" in The Cyber Hymnal Aliases: Damon; Damano; Demaunde; Damond; Dymond Born: ca.1540 Died: 1591 Damon was a foreign composer resident in England. He arrived probably in England in 1566 as a servant of Sir Thomas Sackville. In 1576 he became a recorder player at the Court of Elizabeth I. He was described as having been born in "Luke" and "Lewklande" and, on the assumption that these names refer to Luik or Liège, it has been inferred that he was a Walloon. However contemporary London records describe him as an Italian and a later reference refers to him having been born in "Luke in Italy", i.e. Lucca. His unanglicised name may have been Gulielmo (or Gulielmus) Damano. Daman died from the effects of an ulcer and was buried at St Peter-le-Poer, London, on 26 March 1591. List of choral works: Beati omnes qui timent Dominum Confitebor tibi Domine Miserere nostri Domine Omnis caro gramen sit Praedicabo laudes tuae Domine Spem in alium Publications: The Psalmes of David in English Metre (1579) The Former Booke of Musicke of M. William Damon (1591) The Second Booke of Musicke of M. William Damon (1591) --www3.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/

John H. Gower

1855 - 1922 Person Name: John Henry Gower Hymnal Number: 1457 Composer of "GOWER'S LITANY" in The Cyber Hymnal

Mary B. Reese

Hymnal Number: 12806 Author of "On The Shoals" in The Cyber Hymnal

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