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James Rowe

1865 - 1933 Person Name: Jamres Rowe Hymnal Number: 425 Author of "Love Lifted Me" in Yes, Lord! Pseudonym: James S. Apple. James Rowe was born in England in 1865. He served four years in the Government Survey Office, Dublin Ireland as a young man. He came to America in 1890 where he worked for ten years for the New York Central & Hudson R.R. Co., then served for twelve years as superintendent of the Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society. He began writing songs and hymns about 1896 and was a prolific writer of gospel verse with more than 9,000 published hymns, poems, recitations, and other works. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

W. A. Ogden

1841 - 1897 Person Name: William A. Ogden Hymnal Number: 428 Author of "Look and Live" in Yes, Lord! William Augustine Ogden USA 1841-1897. Born at Franklin County, OH, his family moved to IN when he was age six. He studied music in local singing schools at age 8, and by age 10 could read church music fairly well. Later, he could write out a melody by hearing it sung or played. He enlisted in the American Civil War in the 30th IN Volunteer Infantry. During the war he organized a male choir which became well known throughout the Army of the Cumberland. After the war, he returned home, resumed music study, and taught school. He married Jennie V Headington, and they had two children: Lowell and Marian. He worked for the Iowa Normal School, Toledo Public School System. Among his teachers: Lowell Mason, Thomas Hastings, E E Baily and B F Baker, president of the Boston Music School. He wrote many hymns, both lyrics and/or music. He later issued his first song book, “The silver song” (1870). It became quite popular, selling 500,000 copies. He went on to publish other song books. Ogden also taught music at many schools in the U S and Canada. In 1887 he became superintendent of music in the public schools of Toledo, OH. His works include: “New silver songs for Sunday school” (1872), “Crown of life” (1875), “Notes of victory” (1885), “The way of life” (1886), “Gathering jewels” (1886). He was known as a very enthusiastic person in his work and a very congenial one as well. He died at Toledo, OH. John Perry

Frederick Whitfield

1829 - 1904 Hymnal Number: 440 Author of "O How I Love Jesus" in Yes, Lord! Whitfield, Frederick, B.A., son of H. Whitfield, was born at Threapwood, Shropshire, Jan. 7, 1829, and educated at Trinity College, Dublin, where he took his B.A. in 1859. On taking Holy Orders, he was successively curate of Otley, vicar of Kirby-Ravensworth, senior curate of Greenwich, and Vicar of Stanza John's, Bexley. In 1875 he was preferred to St. Mary's, Hastings. Mr. Whitfield's works in prose and verse number upwards of thirty, including Spiritual unfolding from the Word of Life; Voices from the Valley Testifying of Jesus; The Word Unveiled; Gleanings from Scripture, &c. Several of his hymns appeared in his Sacred Poems and Prose, 1861, 2nd Series, 1864; The Casket, and Quiet Hours in the Sanctuary. The hymn by which he is most widely known is I need Thee, precious Jesu.” Other hymns by him in common use include:~ 1. I have a Great High Priest above. Christ the High Priest. 2. I saw the Cross of Jesus. The Cross. 3. In spirit, Lord, we meet Thee now. Missions. This was written at the request of the Committee of the Irish Church Missions for one of their annual meetings in London. 4. Jesus, Thou Name of magic power. The Name of Jesus. Sometimes given as "Jesus, Thou Name of power divine." 5. The sprinkled blood is speaking. The Blood of Christ. 6. There is a day I long to see. Heaven Anticipated. 7. There is a Name I love to hear. The Name of Jesus. Published in 1855 in hymnsheets and leaflets in various languages. From this the hymn “Jesus, the Name I love so well" is taken. 8. There's naught on earth to rest upon. God Unchangeable. 9. When dead in sin and far from God. Redemption. All these hymns, with the exception of No. 3, are in his Sacred Poems and Prose, 1861, and several of them have been printed as leaflets, and set to special music. The Sacred Poems, &c, contains 26 hymns, some of which are of considerable merit. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Rufus H. McDaniel

1850 - 1940 Person Name: Rufus h. McDaniel Hymnal Number: 442 Author of "Since Jesus Came Into My Heart" in Yes, Lord! Rufus H. McDaniel was ordained in the Christian church in 1873. He found much joy in church music. He began writing hymns in the 1880's. He wrote, "I feel in my soul that God has something for me to do in brightening the experience of struggling souls. My chief desire is to be a blessing, if possible, to my fellow-men through these hymns and thereby glorify God in the name of his dear son 'whose I am and whom I serve.'" Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Gloria Gaither

b. 1942 Hymnal Number: 444 Alterer (st. 4) of "O Happy Day" in Yes, Lord! Gloria Gaither (born March 4, 1942) is a Christian songwriter, author, speaker, editor, and academic. She is the wife of Bill Gaither and also sang in the Bill Gaither Trio, one of the most influential groups in recent Christian music. She was born Gloria Lee Sickal in 1942 in Michigan, a daughter of pastor Lee Sickal and Dorothy Sickal. She spent most of her childhood and high school career in the Battle Creek area of Michigan, working a brief time for the Kellogg Company. When Sickal graduated from high school, she attended Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana. There, she triple majored in English, French, and Sociology. Upon her graduation, she took a job at Alexandria Monroe High School as a French teacher. There, she met Bill Gaither, who was teaching English at the time. She married Gaither in 1962, and they began writing songs recreationally. By the end of the 1960s, Gloria, Bill, and his brother Danny Gaither were touring steadily, as the Bill Gaither Trio. After touring with the Bill Gaither Trio, Gaither drew her focus to the Gaither Homecoming series. She has been an active presence in every video production. Gaither is currently the scriptwriter and narrator for the Homecoming series. In 1991, she attended Ball State University and received a Master of Arts in Literature. She taught as an adjunct professor at Anderson University for periods in the late 80s and late 90s. In 1996, she spearheaded the creation of Gaither Family Reources in Alexandria, Indiana, and currently serves as co-owner and managing director. In 2002, Gaither launched Homecoming:

Anna Bartlett Warner

1824 - 1915 Person Name: Anna B. Warner Hymnal Number: 459 Author of "Jesus Loves Me, This I Know" in Yes, Lord! Warner, Anna, daughter of Henry W. Warner, and sister of Sarah Warner, author of Queechy, and other novels, was born near New York City about 1822. She is the author of the novel, Say and Seal, 1859, and others of a like kind. She also edited Hymns of the Church Militant, 1858; and published Wayfaring Hymns, Original and Translated, 1869. Her original hymns in common use include:— l. Jesus loves me, this I know. The love of Jesus. In Say and Seal. 1859. 2. 0 little child, lie still and sleep. A Mother's Evening Hymn. In Temple Choir. 1867. 3. One more day's work for Jesus. Evening. From Wayfaring Hymns. 1869. 4. The world looks very beautiful. A Child Pilgrim, circa 1860. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Pseudonym: Amy Lo­throp ================ See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

John H. Stockton

1813 - 1877 Hymnal Number: 470 Author of "Only Trust Him" in Yes, Lord! Stockton, John Hart, a Methodist minister, was born in 1813, and died in 1877. He was a member of the New Jersey Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the successive pastoral charges that he filled as a member of that Conference are found in the Conference Journal. He was not only a preacher, but a musician and composer of tunes, as well as hymn writer. He published two gospel song books: Salvation Melodies, 1874, and Precious Songs, 1875. Hymn Writers of the Church by Charles Nutter, 1911 =============== Stockton, John Hart, b. April 19, 1813, and d. March 25, 1877, was the author of "Come, every soul by sin oppressed" (Invitation), in I.D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, 1878, and of "The Cross, the Cross, the blood¬stained Cross" (Good Friday) in the same collection. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) =============== Stockton, John Hart. (New Hope, Pennsylvania, April 19, 1813--March 25, 1877). Born of Presbyterian parents, he was converted at a Methodist camp meeting in 1838, being received into full membership in the New Jersey Conference in 1857. Because of ill health he twice took the "supernumerary relations." He withdrew from actual pastoral work in 1874 and engaged in compiling and publishing gospel hymn books, issuing Salvation Melodies that year and Precious Songs in 1875, writing both words and music for a number of the songs. He died suddenly after attending a Sunday morning service at Arch Street Church, Philadelphia. Our Hymnody, McCutchan, has, perhaps, the fullest account of him readily available. --Robert G. McCutchan, DNAH Archives

Priscilla Jane Owens

1829 - 1907 Person Name: Priscilla J. Owens Hymnal Number: 485 Author of "Jesus Saves" in Yes, Lord! Owens, Priscilla Jane, was born July 21, 1829, of Scotch and Welsh descent, and is now (1906) resident at Baltimore, where she is engaged in public-school work. For 50 years Miss Owen has interested herself in Sunday-school work, and most of her hymns were written for children's services. Her hymn in the Scotch Church Hymnary, 1898, "We have heard a joyful sound" (Missions), was written for a Sunday-school Mission Anniversary, and the words were adapted to the chorus "Vive le Roi" in the opera The Huguenots. [Rev. James Bonar, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix II (1907) ========================= Owens, Priscilla Jane. (July 21, 1829--December 5, 1907). Of Scottish and Welsh ancestry, she spent her entire life in Baltimore. She was a public school teacher there for 49 years. She was a member of the Union Square Methodist Church and took particular interest in its Sunday School. Her literary efforts, both in prose and poetry, appeared in such religious periodicals as the Methodist Protestant and the Christian Standard. --William J. Reynolds, DNAH Archives

Knowles Shaw

1834 - 1878 Hymnal Number: 495 Author of "Bringing in the Sheaves" in Yes, Lord! Knowles Shaw (1834-1878), a name familiar in many western households--was born near New London, in Morgan Township, Ohio, on the 13th of October, 1834. His mother's maiden name was Huldah Griffin, and by both of his parents he was of Scottish extraction. His early life was spent in Rush County, Indiana, where he first began to play the violin, furnishing the music for many a dance. While the ball was going on he was converted, ceasing to play in the middle of the piece he was performing. Very soon thereafter he entered the ministry of the Christian Church. On the 11th of January, 1855, he married Miss Martha Finley. Most of his time after entering the ministry was spent in the West and South, and on account of his wonderful vocal powers he was called the "singing evangelist." As a singer he was considered, in some respects, equal to Sankey and Bliss. reporters of the press al spoke of his singing as something wonderful. Soon after beginning to preach, he began to compose and to write music. His first song was "The Shining Ones," still popular. He published at different times five singing-books: "Shining Pearls," "Golden Gate," "Sparkling Jewels," "The Gospel Trumpet," and the "Morning Star." "Bringing in the Sheaves" was one of the last songs from his hand. His last meeting was held in Dallas, Texas, in May 1878. He was killed by a railroad accident, going from Dallas to McKinney, on the 7th of June, 1878. During his ministry he baptized over eleven thousand persons. --A History and Biographical Cyclopedia of Butler County, Ohio. Cincinnati, 1882. DNAH Archives

Mary Ann Thomson

1834 - 1923 Person Name: Mary A. Thomson Hymnal Number: 496 Author of "O Zion, Haste, Thy Mission High Fulfilling" in Yes, Lord! Thomson, Mary Ann, wife of Mr. John Thomson, Librarian of the Free Library, Philadelphia, was born in London, England, December 5, 1834. She has written about forty hymns, which have appeared mostly in the Churchman, New York, and in the Living Church, Chicago. Four of her hymns are found in the Protestant Episcopal Hymnal, 1892. Of the origin of the missionary hymn by Mrs. Thomson which is found in our Hymnal she writes as follows: I wrote the greater part of the hymn, "O Zion, haste," in the year 1868. I had written many hymns before, and one night, while I was sitting up with one of my children who was ill of typhoid fever, I thought I should like to write a missionary hymn to the tune of the hymn beginning "Hark, hark, my soul, angelic songs are swelling," as I was fond of that tune; but as I could not then get a refrain I liked, I left the hymn unfinished, and about three years later I finished it by writing the refrain which now forms part of it. By some mistake 1891 is given instead of 1871 as the date of the hymn in the (Episcopal) Hymnal. I do not think it is ever sung to the tune for which I wrote it. Rev. John Anketell told me, and I am sure he is right, that it is better for a hymn to have a tune of its own, and I feel much indebted to the composer of the tune "Tidings" for writing so inspiring a tune to my words. Hymn Writers of the Church by Wilber F. Tillett and Charles S. Nutter, 1915 ================== Thomson, Mary Ann, wife of John Thomson, Librarian of the Free Library, Phila., was born in London, England, Dec. 5, 1834. She has written several hymns and poems. To 1895, eight of these appeared in The Churchman (New York); and thirty-four in The Living Church (Chicago). Of her hymns the following were included in The Hymnal, Revised and Enlarged .. . The P. E. Church, U.S.A., 1892 :— 1. Now the blessed Dayspring. [Annunciation B. V. M.] Begins with stanza ii. of "Through the sins and sorrows," which appeared in The Living Church, March 29, 1890. 2. O King of saints, we give Thee praise and glory. [All Saints.] First published in The Living Church, Nov. 8, 1890. In the first ed. of The Book of Praise, N.Y., 1894, it was attributed to Bp. W. W. How in error. 3. O Sion, haste, thy mission high fulfilling. [Missions.] No. 249 in The Hymnal, &c., 1892. 4. Saviour, for the little one. [Burial of a Child.] The Hymnal, &c., 1892, No. 247. Mrs. Thomson's Christmas Carol, "Lo! amid the shades of night," appeared, with music by B. Cecil Klein, in The Churchman, N.Y., Dec. 19, 1891, and separately at Phila. in 1892. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

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