Hymnary.org will be unavailable January 30th, 6:00 to 9:00 PM EST for system maintenance. Thank you for your patience. Hide this message

Person Results

Tune Identifier:"^st_anne_croft$"
In:people

Planning worship? Check out our sister site, ZeteoSearch.org, for 20+ additional resources related to your search.
Showing 61 - 70 of 108Results Per Page: 102050

Michael E. Young

b. 1939 Composer (descant) of "ST. ANNE" in Christian Worship (1993) b. 6-25-39, San Francisco; composer, organist LOC Name Authority File

George Burder

1752 - 1832 Person Name: Burder Author of "Jesus, immortal King, arise" in Worship in the School Room Burder, George, born in London, June 5, 1752, and trained as an engraver. At the age of 24 he commenced preaching with the Calvinist Methodists, but subsequently joined the Congregationalists,and was pastor sucessively at Lancaster, Coventry, and Fetter Lane, London. He was one of the active founders of the Religious Tract, the London Missionary, and the British and Foreign Bible Societies, and some time editor of the Evangelical Magazine. He died May 29, 1832. His works include Village Sermons, 1704; Sea Sermons, 1821; Cottage Sermons, 1826, and others. He is known to hymnology by his Collection of Hymns from various Authors, intended as a Supplement to Dr. Watts, &c, 1784. (Preface dated Nov. 20, 1784.) It had attained to the 25th edition in 1827. To this collection he contributed 4 hymns, the best known being, "Sweet the time, exceeding sweet" (q.v.), sometimes altered to "Great the joy when Christians meet." The remaining three, all from the 1st edition 1784, are:— 1. Come, dear Desire of nations, come. Missions. 2. Come ye that know and fear the Lord. Love of God. In Dr. Hatfield's Church H. Bk., N.Y., 1872, 5 st. out of 9 are given as No. 236. 3. Lord, solemnize our trifling minds. Before Sermon. Altered to "Great God, impress our trifling minds," in the New Congregational Hymn Book, No. 786, &c. Burder's Collection is of importance in the history of Congregational hymnody. The 1st edition, 1784, contained 187 hymns; 2nd edition, 1784, 211; 9th edition, 1803, 257 hymns; 18th edition, 1820, 277; and the last, the 25th edition, 1827, 294. His son, Henry Foster Burder, published a Collection of Ps. & Hymns, 1826; and another son, the Rev. John Burder, also compiled a Collection published without date. To the 18th edition, 1820, of G. Burder's Collection, the wife of his son H. F. Burder contributed "And will the God Who reigns on high " (Sunday Schools), under the signature “S. M. Burder" [Sophia Maria]. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Charles Harford Lloyd

1849 - 1919 Harmonizer of "ST. ANNE" in The United Methodist Hymnal Music Supplement Born: October 16, 1849, Thornbury, Gloss, England. Died: October 16, 1919, Slough, England. Buried: Windsor Cemetery, Windsor, Berkshire, England. Lloyd attended Thornbury Grammar School and Rossall School, and was a Scholar of Magdalen School, Hertford College, Oxford (BMus 1871, BA 1872, MA 175, DMus 1891). He served as organist at Gloucester Cathedral (1876); Christ Church, Oxford (1882, succeeding Samuel Wesley); precentor of Eton College (1892); organist of the Chapel Royal (1914); and editor of Church Hymns (1903). Sources: Frost, p. 680 Music: Credo Domine Lundy Sacramentum Unitatis Savile St. Frideswide http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/l/l/o/lloyd_ch.htm

Terry W. York

b. 1949 Author of "Living Stones" in Celebrating Grace Hymnal Terry W. York is Professor of Christian Ministry and Church Music at Baylor University’s George W. Truett Theological Seminary. He joined the faculty in 1998 after serving three years as the Associate Pastor of Park Cities Baptist Church in Dallas, TX. He received the Bachelor of Arts degree from California Baptist University and his Master of Church Music and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees from New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary. He has been Minister of Music in churches in California and Arizona. From 1984-1995 he served at the Baptist Sunday School Board (now LifeWay Christian Resources) in Nashville, TN. His duties there included being the Project Coordinator for The Baptist Hymnal, 1991. In all, Dr. York has published more than 40 hymns including the well-known Worthy of Worship. His hymn Give Us Courage was commissioned by the Truett Seminary administration and approved by the Truett Seminary faculty as the official Seminary Hymn in 2006. In addition to his hymns, Dr. York has published more than 60 choral anthem texts set by composers such as Bob Burroughs, David Danner, Tom Fettke, Benjamin Harlan, Mary McDonald, Earlene Rentz, David Schwoebel, Joseph Martin, Vicki Hancock Wright, Taylor Scott Davis, and Dan Goeller. The Worship Matrix, co-authored with David Bolin (Celebrating Grace, Inc., 2010), is the fourth of Dr. York’s books to have been translated into Chinese. In June 2008 it was his privilege to be one of two featured plenary speakers at The World Association of Chinese Church Musicians’ biannual conference which met in Kuching, Malaysia. In June 2009, the Baptist Church Music Conference, meeting in Nashville, TN, gave Dr. York the W. Hines Sims Award, its most prestigious recognition. Many of Dr. York’s anthems, books, hymns, sermons, essays, and poems can be accessed on the website he shares with David Bolin, www.textandtune.com. Dr. York and his wife, Janna, have two children and three grandchildren. --Email from Terry W. York to Tina Schneider, 2 May 2014. DNAH Archives

Martin Shaw

1875 - 1958 Person Name: Martin Shaw, 1875- Arranger (Fa-burden) of "ST. ANNE" in Service Book and Hymnal of the Lutheran Church in America Martin F. Shaw was educated at the Royal College of Music in London and was organist and choirmaster at St. Mary's, Primrose Hill (1908-1920), St. Martin's in the Fields (1920-1924), and the Eccleston Guild House (1924-1935). From 1935 to 1945 he served as music director for the diocese of Chelmsford. He established the Purcell Operatic Society and was a founder of the Plainsong and Medieval Society and what later became the Royal Society of Church Music. Author of The Principles of English Church Music Composition (1921), Shaw was a notable reformer of English church music. He worked with Percy Dearmer (his rector at St. Mary's in Primrose Hill); Ralph Vaughan Williams, and his brother Geoffrey Shaw in publishing hymnals such as Songs of Praise (1925, 1931) and the Oxford Book of Carols (1928). A leader in the revival of English opera and folk music scholarship, Shaw composed some one hundred songs as well as anthems and service music; some of his best hymn tunes were published in his Additional Tunes in Use at St. Mary's (1915). Bert Polman

H. Ellis Wooldridge

1845 - 1917 Person Name: H. E. W. Arranger of "[O God, our help in ages past]" in Hymns b. 3/28/1845, Winchester; d. 2/13/17, London; English music scholar LOC Name Authority File

Henry Coleman

Harmonizer of "ST. ANNE" in The United Methodist Hymnal Music Supplement

Thomas M. Westrup

1837 - 1909 Person Name: T. M. Westrup Translator of "Hay un país todo placer" in Himnario provisional con los cánticos Thomas Martin Westrup moved with his family from London to Mexico when he was fifteen years old. He translated hundreds of hymns and, along with his son, Enrique, published a three-volume hymnal Incienso Christiano. Dianne Shapiro from Celebremos su Gloria (Colombia/Illinois: Libros Alianza/Celebration), 1992

A. Cleveland Coxe

1818 - 1896 Person Name: Bishop A. Cleveland Coxe Author of "O where are kings and empires now" in Student Volunteer Hymnal Coxe, Arthur Cleveland, D.D. LL.D. One of the most distinguished of American prelates, and son of an eminent Presbyterian minister, the Rev. Samuel H. Cox, D.D., was born at Mendham, New Jersey, May 10,1818. Graduating at the University of New York in 1838, and taking Holy Orders in 1841, he became Rector of St. John's, Hartford, Connecticut, in the following year. In 1851 he visited England, and on his return was elected Rector of Grace Church, Baltimore, 1854, and Calvary, New York, 1863. His consecration as Bishop of the Western Diocese of New York took place in 1865. His residence is at Buffalo. Bishop Coxe is the author of numerous works. His poetical works were mostly written in early life, and include Advent, 1837; Athanasion, &c, 1842; Christian Ballads, 1840 (Preface to the English edition, April, 1848); Hallowe'en and Other Poems, 1844; Saul, a Mystery, 1845, &c. Some of Bishop Coxe's hymns are found in the collections of every religious body in America, except the official collections of his own. This is accounted for by his too scrupulous modesty. As a member of the Hymnal Committee, in 1869-71, he refused to permit the insertion of his own lyrics. As he has not preserved memoranda, and has no precise recollection of dates, several dates here given are somewhat uncertain. 1. Behold an Israelite indeed. St. Bartholomew. First appeared in "Poems," published with his Christian Ballads, 1840, and found in an altered form in the People's H. and the Hymnary. 2. Body of Jesus, 0 sweet Food. Holy Communion. Written at St. James's College, Maryland (since broken up by the Civil War), Ascension Day, 1858. It was first printed for private use, and then published in the Cantate Domino, Boston, 1859, No. 53, and again in other American collections. It is also in Schaff’s Christ in Song, 1869, and in The Churchman's Altar Manual, 2nd ed., 1883. 3. Breath of the Lord, 0 Spirit blest.Whitsuntide. Bishop Coxe considers this more worthy of being called a hymn than anything else from his pen. It was written long before it appeared in the New York Independent, Whitsuntide, 1878. It is in the Schaff-Gilman Library of Religious Poetry, 1881, and Brooke's Churchman's Manual of Private and Family Devotion, 1883. 4. Christ is arisen. Easter. This is suggested by, and partly translated from, the famous Easter Chorus in Goethe's Faust, "Christ ist erstanden" (see Goethe), and appeared in Hallowe'en, 1844. 5. He who for Christ hath left behind. St. Matthew. From his Christian Ballads, &c, 1840. 6. In the silent midnight watches. Christ knocking. From his Athanasion, &c, 1842; an impressive moral poem rather than a hymn on Christ knocking at the door, extensively used in America, and sometimes in England. Original text, Schaff's Christ in Song, 1869. 7. Lord, when Thou didst come from heaven. A hymn for Epiphany, on behalf of Western Missions, appeared among the "Lays "appended to Hallowe'en, 1844, and again in later editions of the Christian Ballad. It is sometimes abbreviated, as in Lyra Sac. Amer., " Westward, Lord, the world alluring." 8. Now pray we for our country. National Hymn. A stanza from Chronicles, or meditations on events in the history of England, called up by visiting her abbeys and cathedrals, and appeared in Christian Ballads, 1840. Originally it began, "Now pray we for our mother," and, with the succeeding stanza, was a call upon Americans to pray for their mother country. It is adopted by Dr. Martineau in his Hys., 1873. 9. 0 walk with God, and thou shalt find. Holiness. Appeared in his Hallowe’en, &c, 1844, and is found in Lyra Sac. Amer. 10. 0 where are kings and empires now! Church of God. The 6th stanza of his ballad "Chelsea," which appeared in the Churchman, 1839, and again in his Christian Ballads, 1840. 11. Saviour, sprinkle many nations. Missions. “Begun on Good Friday, 1850, and completed 1851, in the grounds of Magdalen College, Oxford." 1st published. in Verses for 1851, in Commemoration of the third Jubilee of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, edited by the Rev. Ernest Hawkins, 1851. It was subsequently appended to the English edition of his Christian Ballads. It is regarded as Bishop Coxe's best piece, and to many minds it is the loveliest of missionary hymns. Its use in England is very extensive. It is not found in the American Episcopal hymnal for the reason given above. 12. Still as our day our strength shall be. Temptation. Appeared in his Hallowe'en, &c, 1844, and Lyra Sac. Amer. 13. Soldier, to the contest pressing. Christian Conflict. From his Hallowe'en, &c, 1844, and Lyra Sac. Amer. It was written in 1834. 14. There is a land like Eden fair. From Hallowe'en, &c, into a few collections. 15. We are living, we are dwelling. Christian Soldiers. An impressive moral poem rather than a hymn, but extensively used. It appeared in his Athanasion, &c, 1840, and Lyra &xc. 16. Who is this, with garments gory. Passiontide. From his “Lays" appended to Hallowe'en, 1844, and again in his Christian Ballads. It is found in the Child's Christian Year, 4th ed. N.D., the People's Hymns, and other collections. It is in 4 stanza of 8 1. The last stanza is sometimes given as a separate hymn:—"Hail, all hail, Thou Lord of Glory." 17. When o'er Judea's vales and hills. Written cir. 1840, and published in his Hallowe'en, &c, 1844, and again, with the author's final corrections, made in 1869, in Schaff's Christ in Song (1870 ed. p. 112). Also in the English edition of his Christian Ballads. From this "Hymn to the Redeemer," two shorter hymns have been com¬piled : (1) " How beauteous were the marks divine." This is in almost universal American and occasional English use. (2) "O who like Thee, so calm, so bright," in the Hymnary, 1872. Bishop Coxe has also translated the Pange lingua gloriosi corporis (q. v.), and is the author of the beautiful Christmas Carol, "Carol, carol, Christians," given in his Christian Ballads, &c. [Rev. F. M. Bird] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

J. A. Mackay

1838 - 1923 Person Name: John Alexander Mackay, 1838-1923 Translator (into Cree) of "O God, Our Help in Ages Past" in Common Praise (1998)

Pages


Export as CSV



Advertisements


It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. Ad revenue helps keep us running. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or subscribing to eliminate ads entirely and help support Hymnary.org.