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Horatio Gates Spafford

1828 - 1888 Person Name: Horatio G. Spafford Hymnal Number: 376 Author of "It Is Well with My Soul" in Yes, Lord!

Dorothy A. Thrupp

1779 - 1847 Hymnal Number: 385 Author (attributed to) of "Savior, Like a Shepherd, Lead Us" in Yes, Lord! Dorothy Ann Thrupp was born in London, June 10, 1779. She contributed some hymns, under the pseudonym of "Iota," to W. Carus Wilson's Friendly Visitor and his Children's Friend. Other hymns by her, signed "D.A.T.," appeared in Mrs. Herbert Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the Use of Infant Schools and Nurseries, 1838. She was also the editor of Hymns for the Young, c. 1830, in which all the hymns were given anonymously. She died in London on December 15, 1847. --The Hymnal 1940 Companion ================================ Thrupp, Dorothy Ann, daughter of Joseph Thrupp, of Paddington Green, was born at London, June 20, 1779 and died there on Dec. 14, 1847. Her hymns, a few of which have come into extensive use, were contributed to the Rev. W. Carus Wilson's Friendly Visitor and his Children's Friend, under the nom de plume of Iota; to Mrs. Herbert Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the use of Infant Schools and Nurseries, 1838 (3rd ed. 1846, with change of title to A Sel. . . . of Infant and Juvenile Schools and Families), in which her signature is "D.A.T."; and also to the Hymns for the Young, which she herself edited for the Religious Tract Society circa 1830, 4th ed., 1836. In 1836 and 1837 she also published Thoughts for the Day (2nd series), in which she embodied many hymns which previously appeared in the Friendly Visitor. In addition to her hymns, which are annotated under their respective first lines there are also in common use:— 1. Come, Holy Spirit, come, 0 hear an infant's prayer. Child's Prayer. Appeared in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry, 1838, No. 14, and signed "D.A.T." 2. God loves the little child that prays. God's love for Children. Given in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836; and again in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry&c, 2nd ed., 1840, and signed " D.A.T." It is sometimes given as "God loves the child that humbly prays." 3. Have you read the wondrous story? Life and Death of Jesus. This appeared anonymously in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, R. T. S., 1830, No. 12, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines. In Miss Thrupp's later publications this hymn is omitted, a fact which suggests that it was not her composition, but possibly that of a friend. It is in theLeeds Sunday School Union Hymn Book, 1833-78. 4. Let us sing with one accord. Praise of Jesus. This hymn is usually associated with Miss Thrupp's name, but on insufficient evidence. We find it in the 4th edition of her Hymns for the Young, 1836, and again in the 3rd ed. of Mrs. H. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry for the Use of Infant and Juvenile Schools, &c, 1846, and in both instances without signature. We know of no evidence which justifies us in ascribing the authorship with certainty to Miss Thrupp. The hymn is in the Leeds S. S. Union Hymn Book, 1833-78, and several others. 5. Poor and needy though I be. Divine Providence. Appeared in Miss Thrupp's Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, No. 22; and again in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry>, &c, 2nd ed., 1840, and signed "D.A.T." 6. See, my child, the mighty ocean. Love of God compared to the Sea. Given in the R. T. S.'s Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, No. 26, and in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hymns and Poetry, &c, 1st ed., 1838, and signed "D.A. T." In Kennedy, 1863, it begins "Have you seen the mighty ocean." 7. Thou Guardian of my earliest days. Jesus the Children's Friend. This hymn we have traced to her Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836. It is sometimes given as “Thou Guardian of our earliest days." 8. What a strange and wondrous story. Life and Death of Jesus. This hymn is found without signature in her Hymns for the Young, 4th ed., 1836, and again in Mrs. H. Mayo's Selection of Hys. and Poetry, 1838, No. 173, in 4 st. of 4 1, We have found no authority for ascribing it to Miss Thrupp. 9. What led the Son of God? Love of God in Christ. This appeared anonymously in her Hymns for the Young, 1830, and again in the Leeds S. S. Union Hymn Book, 1833. In modern collections it is attributed to Miss Thrupp, on the ground that it is found in the Hys. for the Young, which she edited. 10. Who are they in heaven who stand? All Saints. Published in Mrs. Mayo's Selection of Hys. and Poetry, 3rd ed., 1846, No. 64, in 5 stanzas of 4 lines, and signed A. D.T." It is in the Prim. Methodist Sunday School Hymn Book, 1879, and others. Several additional hymns to those named above have also been attributed to Miss Thrupp on insufficient authority. This has probably arisen out of the fact that all the hymns in the Hymns for the Young, including her own, were given anonymously. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

J. H. Gilmore

1834 - 1918 Person Name: Joseph H. Gilmore Hymnal Number: 391 Author of "He Leadeth Me, O Blessed Thought" in Yes, Lord! Joseph H. Gilmore (b. Boston, MA, 1834; d. Rochester, NY, 1918) Educated at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, and Newton Theological Seminary, Newton, Massachusetts, Gilmore was ordained to the Baptist ministry in 1862. He served churches in Fisherville, New Hampshire, and Rochester, New York. In 1868 he was appointed to the English faculty at the University of Rochester, where he served until retirement in 1911. He published various literary works, including Outlines of English and American Literature (1905). Bert Polman ============ Gilmore, Joseph Henry, M. A., Professor of Logic in Rochester University, New York, was born at Boston, April 29, 1834, and graduated in Arts at Brown University, and in Theology at Newton Theological Institution. In the latter he was Professor of Hebrew in 1861-2. For some time he held a Baptist ministerial charge at Fisherville, New Hampshire, and at Rochester. He was appointed Professor at Rochester in 1868. His hymn, "He leadeth me, O blessed thought" (Ps. xxiii.), is somewhat widely known. It was written at the close of a lecture in the First Baptist Church, Philadelphia, and is dated 1859. It is in the Baptist Hymnal [and Tune] Book, Philadelphia, 1871. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M. A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Frank E. Graeff

1860 - 1919 Hymnal Number: 393 Author of "Does Jesus Care?" in Yes, Lord! Frank E. Graeff was a minister in the Philadelphia Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a prolific writer of hymns, stories, poems and articles. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Frank M. Davis

1839 - 1896 Hymnal Number: 394 Author of "Lead Me, Savior" in Yes, Lord! Frank Marion Davis USA 1839-1896. Born at Marcellus, NY, he became a teacher and professor of voice, a choirmaster and a good singer. He traveled extensively, living in Marcellus, NY, Vicksburg, MS, Baltimore, MD, Cincinnati, OH, Burr Oak and Findley, MI. He compiled and published several song books: “New Pearls of Song” (1877), “Notes of Praise” (1890), “Crown of gold” (1892), “Always welcome” (1881), “Songs of love and praise #5” (1898), “Notes of praise”, and “Brightest glory”. He never married. John Perry

Henry J. Zelley

1859 - 1942 Hymnal Number: 401 Author of "Heavenly Sunlight" in Yes, Lord! Henry Jeffreys Zelley was born at Mt. Holly, NJ, on Mar. 15, 1859. Educated in the Mt. Holly public schools, at Pennington Seminary, and at Taylor University, where he earned his M. A., Ph. D., and D. D. degrees, he became a Methodist minister in 1882 and first served in the New Jersey Conference as a statistical secretary, treasurer, and trustee, becoming a promoter of the campmeeting movement. Noted for his evangelistic fervor, Zelley produced over 1500 poems, hymns, and gospel songs. One of his songs, "He Brought Me Out" with music by Henry L. Gilmour, appears in several denominational hymnals. Cyberhymnal also lists "When Israel Out of Bondage Came" or "He Rolled the Sea Away" with music by Gilmour too. Another of Zelley’s songs, "The Mountains of Faith" with music by M. L. McPhail, is found in Sacred Selections. After working with nineteen different churches in the New Jersey Conference over his lifetime, Zelley, who also served as a trustee of Pennington Seminary, retired in 1929 and died at Trenton, NJ, on Mar. 16, 1942. --http://homeschoolblogger.com/hymnstudies

W. P. Mackay

1839 - 1885 Person Name: William P. Mackay Hymnal Number: 405 Author of "Revive Us Again" in Yes, Lord! Mackay, William Paton, M.D., was born at Montrose, May 13, 1839, and educated at the University of Edinburgh. After following his medical profession for a time, he became minister of Prospect Street Presbyterian Church, Hull, in 1868, and died from an accident, at Portree, Aug. 22, 1885. Seventeen of his hymns are in W. Reid's Praise Book, 1872. Of these the best known is "We praise Thee, O God, for the Son of Thy love" (Praise to God), written 1863, recast 1867. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix II (1907) ====================== Born: May 13, 1839, Montrose, Scotland. Died: August 22, 1885, Portree, Scotland, of an accident. Mackay graduated from the University of Edinburgh and initially worked as a doctor. However, he was ordained, and in 1868 became pastor of the Prospect Street Presbyterian Church in Hull. He married Mary Loughton Livingstone 1868 in Kingston Upon Hull, Yorkshire; they were living in Sculcoates, Yorkshire, as of 1881. Seventeen of his hymns appeared in W. Reid’s Praise Book in 1872. Sources: Hustad, p. 278 Julian, p. 1667 Reynolds, p. 365 http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/m/a/c/mackay_wp.htm

M. B. C. Slade

1826 - 1882 Person Name: Mary B. C. Slade Hymnal Number: 407 Author of "Footsteps of Jesus" in Yes, Lord! Mary Bridges Canady Slade USA 1826-1882. Born in Fall River, MA, she was well-educated and became a minister's wife, teacher, and poet. She was assistant editor of The New England Journal of Education. She also authored hymns, Sunday school materials and books on education, primarily used for training teachers. She authored a children's magazine, “Wide-awake”. She and her husband were active in the underground railroad (helping slaves achieve their freedom). She spent her whole life living in the same town. John Perry

E. W. Blandly

b. 1849 Person Name: E. W. Blandy Hymnal Number: 409 Author of "Where He Leads Me" in Yes, Lord! Rv Ernest William Blandly (sometimes spelled Blandy) United Kingdom 1849-? He was a British minister that migrated to the USA in 1884 with his wife, Eliza. He became an officer in the Salvation Army and, in 1890, felt called to live in a Manhattan New York slum called “Hell's kitchen” with gangs and low life. He wrote several hymn lyrics. John Perry

Philip Doddridge

1702 - 1751 Hymnal Number: 418 Author of "Great God, We Sing That Mighty Hand" in Yes, Lord! Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Northampton." He died in Lisbon soon after his arrival. Doddridge wrote some four hundred hymn texts, generally to accompany his sermons. These hymns were published posthumously in Hymns, Founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures (1755); relatively few are still sung today. Bert Polman ======================== Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the last stage of consumption. He sailed to Lisbon, in 1751, where he died October 26, the same year. Two hundred pupils in all, gathered from England, Scotland and Holland, were prepared in his seminary, chiefly for the dissenting ministry, but partly for professions. The wide range of subjects, including daily readings in Hebrew and Greek, Algebra, Trigonometry, Watts' Logic, outline of Philosophy, and copious Divinity, is itself a proof of Doddridge's learning. He was presented with his D.D. degree by the University of Aberdeen. His fame as a divine, combined with his wide sympathies and gentle, unaffected goodness, won for him the friendship of Watts, Col. Gardiner and Hervey, and the esteem of Seeker and Warburton. He welcomed the work of Wesley and Whitefield, and entertained the latter on his visit to Northampton. His Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul and The Family Expositor both did good work in their day. For criticism of his hymns see English Hymnody, Early, § XIV. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] After Dr. Doddridge's death his hymns were published by his friend Job Orton, in 1755, as:— "Hymns founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures. By the late Reverend Philip Doddridge, D.D. Published from the Author's Manuscript by Job Orton . . . Salop. Printed by J. Eddowes and J. Cotton, &c. MDCCLV." Concerning the text of the hymns, Orton says in his Preface:— "There may perhaps be some improprieties, owing to my not being able to read the author's manuscript in particular places, and being obliged, without a poetical genius, to supply those deficiencies, whereby the beauty of the stanza may be greatly defaced, though the sense is preserved." The 1st edition contained 370 hymns; the 2nd, 1759, 374; and the 3rd, 1766, and later editions, 375. In 1839 Doddridge's great-grandson re-edited the hymns from the original manuscript and published the same as:— Scriptural Hymns by the Rev. Philip Doddridge, D.D. New and corrected edition containing many hymns never before printed. Edited from the Original Documents by the Author's great-grandson, John Doddridge Humphreys, Esq. Lond. Darton & Clark, 1839. This work contains 22 additional hymns. The text differs in many instances from Orton's, but these changes have not come into common use. In addition to the manuscript used by Orton and J. D. Humphreys, another containing 100 hymns (five of which are not in any edition of the Hymns), all in the author's handwriting, and most of them dated, is referred to in this Dictionary as the "D. Manuscripts." It is the property of Mr. W. S. Booker and family. A manuscript, not in Doddridge's handwriting, of 77 "Hymns by P. Doddridge, Mar. 16, 1739/1740," is in the possession of Mr. W. T. Brooke. The existence of these manuscripts is accounted for from the fact that Doddridge's hymns were freely circulated in manuscript during his lifetime. It is from his correspondence with R. Blair (q.v.) that the few compositions traceable to him in the Scottish Trans. & Paraphrases were derived. The hymns by Doddridge which have attained to the greatest popularity are:— “Awake, my soul, stretch every nerve"; " Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? " "Grace 'tis a charming sound”; " Hark, the glad sound, the Saviour comes"; "My God, and is Thy table spread?" "O happy day, that fixed my choice"; "O God of Jacob [Bethel], by Whose hand”; " See Israel's gentle Shepherd stand"; "Ye servants of the Lord." These hymns, with many besides, are annotated under their respective first lines. Of the rest, taken from the Hymns, &c, 1755, the following are also in common use:— 1. Behold the gloomy vale. Death anticipated. 2. Behold the Great Physician stands. Christ the Physician. 3. Captives of Israel, hear. Spiritual Deliverance. 4. Eternal God, our wondering souls. Enoch's Piety and Translation. 5. Eternal Source of life and thought. Subjection to the Father. G. Exalted Prince of Life, we own. Christ the Prince and Saviour. 7. Father Divine, the Saviour cried. Christ's Submission to the Father. 8. Father Divine, Thy piercing eye. Secret Prayer. 9. Father of mercies, send Thy grace. Sympathy. The Good Samaritan. 10. Go, saith the Lord, proclaim my grace. Forgiveness. 11. God of Eternity, from Thee. Redeeming the Time. 12. God of my life, through all its [my] days. Praising God continually. 13. God. of salvation, we adore. Praise to God for Redemption. 14. Great Father of mankind. Gentiles brought into the Church. 15. Great God, we sing that mighty hand. The New Tear. 16. Great Leader of Thine Israel's host. During Persecution. 17. Great Lord of angels, we adore. Ordination. 18. Great Spirit of immortal love. Purity of Heart desired. 19. Great Teacher of Thy Church, we own. The Divine Precepts. 20. Hail, everlasting Prince of Peace. Sympathy. 21. Hail to the Prince of life and peace. Praise to Christ. 22. Hear, gracious [Saviour] Sovereign, from Thy throne. The Blessings of the Holy Spirit desired. 23. How gentle God's commands. God's Care of His Own. 24. How rich Thy favours, God of grace. God and His Living Temple. 25. How swift the torrent flows [rolls]. Our Fathers, where are they? 26. Jesus the Lord, our souls adore. Christ the Forerunner. 27. Jesus, we own Thy Sovereign hand. Christ to be fully known hereafter. 28. Loud let the tuneful trumpet sound. Gospel Jubilee. 29. My gracious Lord, I own Thy right. Life in Jesus. 30. My [Dear] Saviour, I am [we are] Thine. Joined to Christ through the Spirit. 31. My soul, with all thy waking powers. The Choice of Moses. 32. Now let our voices join. Singing in the ways of God. 33. 0 injured Majesty of heaven. Lent. 34. 0 Zion, tune thy voice. Glory of the Church of Christ. 35. Peace, 'tis the Lord Jehovah's hand. Resignation. 36. Praise the Lord of boundless might. The Father of Lights. 37. Praise to Thy Name, Eternal God. Growth in Grace desired. 38. Remark, my soul, the narrow bounds. The New Year. 39. Repent, the Voice celestial cries. Lent. 40. Return, my roving heart, return. Heart communing. 41. Salvation, O melodious sound. God our Salvation. 42. Saviour of men, and Lord of love. Ministry and Death of Christ. 43. Searcher of hearts, before Thy face. Peter to Simon Magus. 44. Shepherd of Israel, Thou dost keep. Induction or Settlement of a Minister. 45. Shine forth, eternal Source of light. Knowledge of God desired. 46. Shine on our souls, eternal God. Sunday. 47. Sing, ye redeemed of the Lord. Joy on the Homeward Way. 48. Sovereign of life, before Thine eye. Life and Death in God's hands. 49. The darkened sky, how thick it lours. Sorrow followed by Joy. 50. The day approacheth, O my soul. Judgment anticipated. 51. The King of heaven His table spreads. The Gospel Feast. 52. The promises I sing. The unchanging promises of God. 53. The swift-declining day. Walk in the Light. 54. These mortal joys, how soon they fade. Treasures, Perishable and Eternal. 55. Thy judgments cry aloud. Retributive Providence. 56. Thy presence, Everlasting God. Omnipresence of the Father. 57. 'Tis mine, the covenant of His grace. Death anticipated. 58. To Thee, my God; my days are known. Life under the eye of God. 59. Tomorrow, Lord, is Thine. Uncertainty of Life. 60. Triumphant Lord, Thy goodness reigns. The Divine Goodness. 61. Triumphant Zion, lift thy head. The Church Purified and Guarded. 62. Unite my roving thoughts, unite. Peace. 63. What mysteries, Lord, in Thee combine. Christ, the First and Last. 64. While on the verge of life I stand. Death anticipated with Joy. 65. With ecstacy of Joy. Christ the Living Stone. 66. Ye golden lamps of heaven, farewell. Heaven opening. 67. Ye hearts with youthful vigour warm. The Young encouraged. 68. Ye humble souls, that seek the Lord. Easter. 69. Ye sons of men, with joy record. Praise of the Works of God. 70. Yes, the Redeemer rose. Easter In Dr. Hatfield's Church HymnBook, N. Y., 1872, Nos. 9, 12, 14, 15, 21, 23, 25, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 39, 40, 44, 47, 51, 61, 64, 65, 67, 69, 70, as above, are dated 1740. What authority there may be for this date we cannot say, these hymns not being in any “D. MSS." with which we are acquainted, and no dates are given in the Hymns, &c, 1755. Some later American editors have copied this date from Dr. Hatfield. Doddridge's hymns are largely used by Unitarians both in Great Britain and America. As might be expected, the Congregationalists also draw freely from his stores. The Baptists come next. In the hymnals of the Church of England the choicest, only are in use. Taken together, over one-third of his hymns are in common usage at the present time. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================ Doddridge, Philip, D.D. At p. 305 an account is given of a manuscript volume of Doddridge's Hymns, which is the property of the Rooker family. Since that article was written another manuscript vol. has been found. It was the property of Lady Frances Gardiner, née Erskine, an intimate friend of Doddridge, and wife of Col. Gardiner. It is a copy of the Rooker manuscipt, with the revised text, as in the margin of that ms., and is in Doddridge's hand¬writing. It was from this manuscript that the Doddridge hymns were taken for the Scottish Translationsand Paraphrases, 1745. Additional hymns by Dr. Doddridge still in common use include:— 1. My God, how cheerful is the sound. All in Christ. 2. My Saviour, let me hear Thy voice. Pardon desired. 3. My soul, triumphant in the Lord. Divine Guidance assured. 4. No «iore, ye wise, your wisdom boast. Glorying in God alone. From Hymns, No. 128. 5. Now be that Sacrifice survey'd. Christ our Sacrifice. 6. 0 Israel, blest beyond compare. Happiness of God's Israel. 7. Our fathers, where are they? Considering the Past. From Hymns, No. 164. 8. Praise to the Lord on high. Missions. 9. Praise to the radiant Source of bliss. Praise for Divine Guidance. 10. Return, my soul, and seek thy rest. Rest in Jesus. 11. Salvation doth to God belong. National Thanksgiving. 12. Sovereign of Life, I own Thy hand. On Recovery from Sickness. 13. The sepulchres, how thick they stand. Burial. 14. There is a Shepherd kind and strong. The Good Shepherd. From Hymns, No. 216. 15. Wait on the Lord, ye heirs of hope. Waiting on God. 16. We bless the eternal Source of light. Christ's care of the Church. 17. With transport, Lord, our souls proclaim. Immutability of Christ. 18. Ye mourning saints, whose streaming tears. Death and Burial. These all appeared in Dr. Doddridge's Hymns, 1755. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

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