Person Results

‹ Return to hymnal
Hymnal, Number:yl1982
In:people

Planning worship? Check out our sister site, ZeteoSearch.org, for 20+ additional resources related to your search.
Showing 41 - 50 of 463Results Per Page: 102050

Jennie Evelyn Hussey

1874 - 1958 Hymnal Number: 317 Author of "Lead Me to Calvary" in Yes, Lord! Jane Evelyn Hussy was born 8 February 1874 in Henniker, N.H. She was an invalid from rheumatism. She began writing verse as a child. The first were published when she was thirteen. At sixteen she began to write stories, articles and designs for crochet needlework for magazines. In 1898 her first hymns were published. She was a member of the Society of Friends. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

H. R. Palmer

1834 - 1907 Person Name: Horatio R. Palmer Hymnal Number: 325 Author of "Yield Not to Temptation" in Yes, Lord! Palmer, Horatio Richmond, MUS. DOC, was born April 26, 1834. He is the author of several works on the theory of music; and the editor of some musical editions of hymnbooks. To the latter he contributed numerous tunes, some of which have attained to great popularity, and 5 of which are in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, London, 1881. His publications include Songs of Love for the Bible School; and Book of Anthems, the combined sale of which has exceeded one million copies. As a hymnwriter he is known by his "Yield not to temptation," which was written in 1868, and published in the National Sunday School Teachers' Magazine, from which it passed, with music by the author, into his Songs of Love, &c, 1874, and other collections. In America its use is extensive. Dr. Palmer's degree was conferred by the University of Chicago in 1880. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) =============== Palmer, H. R., p. 877, i. The hymn "Would you gain the best in life" (Steadfastness), in the Congregational Sunday School Supplement, 1891, the Council School Hymn Book, 1905, and others, is by this author. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

John H. Sammis

1846 - 1919 Person Name: James H. Sammis Hymnal Number: 334 Author of "Trust and Obey" in Yes, Lord! John H. Sammis was born in Brooklyn. He moved to Logansport, Indiana when ye was 22, where he was converted to Christianity. He was active in the Y.M.C.A., serving as secretary for the Terre Haute Association and later becoming State Secretary. After this, he studied at Lane and McCormack seminaries and was ordained in the Presbyterian church at Glidden, Iowa. He also pastored churches in Indianapolis, Grand Haven, MI, Red Wing and St. Paul, Minn. In 1909 he became associated with the Los Angeles Bible Institute. He wrote more that 100 hymns. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

William R. Featherston

1846 - 1873 Hymnal Number: 335 Author of "My Jesus, I Love Thee" in Yes, Lord! William Ralph Featherston(e) Canada 1846-1873. Born at Montreal, Quebec, Canada, he joined the Wesleyan Methodist Church there. He became a Christian at age 16 while in Toronto, and is thought to have written his famous hymn about the same time. He sent the poem to his aunt, Ms. E. Featherston Wilson and she gave it to a publisher. Adoniram. J Gordon, an evangelist, founder of Gordon College & Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, found the hymn in a 1870 London hymnal and was impressed with the words, but did not like the tune, so he composed the melody that has been used with the hymn ever since. Featherstone is thought to have married Julie R MacAlister in 1869 and that they had a son, John, in 1870. Featherstone died in Montreal at age 26. John Perry

William D. Longstaff

1822 - 1894 Hymnal Number: 336 Author of "Take Time to Be Holy" in Yes, Lord! William Dunn Longstaff United Kingdom 1822-1894. Born at Sunderland, Durham, England, the son of a wealthy ship owner, he was a person of independent financial means. Although Longstaff had everything he desired, he still had an empty feeling in his life, and attended church one day and was inspired by words of a China missionary, Griffith John, on furlough to England, preaching at a service in Keswick, England, citing I Peter 1:16, “Be ye holy, for I am holy”. That resulted in him giving his heart to the Lord and beginning a Christian life, dedicated to God. He became a generous philanthropist and was influential in evangelical circles. Following his friend, Rev Arthur A Rees, a persuasive Welsh preacher, who left the Anglican priesthood after disagreements with his rector and bishop, Dunn served as church treasurer for Ree’s Bethesda Free Chapel in Sunderland. He married Joice Burlinson in 1853 and they had eight children: William, Hannah, Rhoda, Amelia, Ernest, Nora, Marnia, and Minnie. Longstaff befriended well-known evangelists, including William Booth of the Salvation Army, to whose work he generously contributed. Some of Langstaff’s hymns were published in the Salvation Army magazine, “The War Cry” during the 1880s. He also financed Dwight Moody’s evangelical crusades in England and Scotland when Moody’s funding dried up after their financier died. During the crusade they preached to 20,000 people. Longstaff did not forget that first sermon he heard, and it prompted the writing of his hymn lyrics, which he later showed to Ira Sankey during their crusade. Sankey showed it to George Stebbins, who set it to music in 1882 during a revival in India. In 1881 Longstaff’s wife died. He died at Sunderland, England. John Perry

Clara H. Scott

1841 - 1897 Hymnal Number: 360 Author of "Open My Eyes That I May See" in Yes, Lord! Clara Harriett Fiske Jones Scott USA 1841-1897. Born at Elk Grove, IL, daughter of a farmer, the family moved to Chicago in 1856. Clara enrolled in the first Chicago Musical Institute, after founders, Chauncy M Cady and William Bradbury, opened it in 1858. Following her graduation from the program, she found employment at the new Lyons Girl’s Seminary (also founded in 1858) in Lyons, IA. While working there, she met Henry Clay Scott, who worked for Scott & Ovington Brothers wholesale crockery company. The two married in 1861 in McGregor, IA. They had two daughters, Medora and Mary. The family moved to Austin, IL, near Chicago in the 1870s. She become a composer, hymnwriter, and publisher. She was the first woman to publish a volume of anthems, ‘The Royal anthem book’ in 1882. Horatio Palmer, a friend, helped her publish her songs. She issued three collections of songs. In 1895 she and her husband, now an invalid, moved to Chicago. In 1897 she was returning to her friend’s house after attending a funeral in DuBuque, IA. She was driving a horse-drawn buggy with two friends, Martha Hay and D D Myers. The buggy’s hold-back strap snapped, spooking the horse, who raced forward, colliding with a coping stone, causing the buggy to roll. Clara and Martha were thrown out and both died instantly. The third lady, D D, was severly injured. Clara’s funeral was well-attended by music writers, teachers, professors, publishers, and friends. Two of her own compositions were sung by a quartet of close friends. She died at Dubuque, IA. John Perry

E. Prentiss

1818 - 1878 Person Name: Elizabeth P. Prentiss Hymnal Number: 362 Author of "More Love to Thee, O Christ" in Yes, Lord! Elizabeth Payson Prentiss USA 1818-1878. Born at Portland, ME, 5th child of Congregationalist minister, Edward Payson. He died of tuberculosis in 1827, and the family moved to New York City in 1831. That year she professed faith in Christ and joined the Bleeker Street Presbyterian Church. She possessed keen abilities, including sympathy and perceptiveness. She began writing stories and poems, and contributed her works to “The youth’s companion”, a New England religious periodical. In 1838 she opened a small girls’ school in her home and took up a Sabbath-school class as well. Two years later, she moved to Richmond, VA, to be a department head at a girls’ boarding school. In 1845 she married George Lewis Prentiss, a brother of her close friend, Anna Prentiss Stearns. The Prentisses settled in New Bedford, MA, where George became pastor of South Trinitarian Church. In 1851 George became pastor of Mercer St Presbyterian Church in New York City. After a happy period in life, by 1852 she had lost two of her three children, one as a newborn, one at age four. However, she went on to have three more healthy children, despite her poor health. She wrote her first book of stories, published in 1853. In 1856 she penned her famous hymn lyrics (noted below) after she nearly lost her daughter, Minnie, to an illness. After George resigned from his church due to failing health, the family went abroad for a couple of years. In 1860 they returned to NY, where George resumed his pastorate and held a chair at Union Theological Seminary. She published her most popular book, “Stepping heavenward” in 1869, furnishing it in installments to ‘Chicago Advance’. The family evenually settled in Dorset, VT, where she died. After her death, her husband published “The life and letters of Elizabeth Prentiss” in 1882. The family children were: Annie, Eddy, Bessie, Minnie, George, and Henry. John Perry ================ Prentiss, Elizabeth, née Payson, youngest daughter of Dr. Edward Payson, was born at Portland, Maine, Oct. 26, 1818; married to George Lewis Prentiss, D.D., then at Bedford, Massachusetts, April, 1845; and died at Dorset, Vermont, Aug. 13, 1878. Her Life and Letters by her husband appeared some time after. Dr. Prentiss removed from Bedford to New York in 1851, and was appointed Professor of Pastoral Theology at Union Seminary, New York, 1873. Mrs. Prentiss's works include The Flower of the Family; Stepping Heavenward, 1869; and Religious Poems, 1873. Of her hymns the two following are most widely known:— 1. As on a vast eternal shore Thanksgiving. Contributed to Schaff's Christ in Song, 1869. 2. More love to Thee, 0 Christ. More Love to Christ desired. Written in 1869, and first printed on a fly-sheet; then in Hatfield's Church Hymn Book, N. Y., 1872. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Mary Brown

1856 - 1918 Hymnal Number: 367 Author (st. 1) of "I'll Go Where You Want Me to Go" in Yes, Lord! From the Norwich Bulletin, Norwich, Connecticut, January 23, 1918: The death of Miss Mary M. Brown at Backus Hospital Tuesday morning saddened a host of friends and the different pupils who have had the benefit of her instruction for so many years. Miss Brown was born in Natick, R. I., May 19, 1856. She was the daughter of Lydia A. Higgins and Joseph R. C. Brown. Her common and high school education was received in Rockport, Mass. At the time there was a normal school in Norwich over twenty years ago, she took the course there and was graduated, after which she taught in the Model School in Norwich. Miss Brown has taught in the Jewett City schools for twenty years. A teacher more faithful to the interests of the scholars and school cannot be found. Her interest in the welfare of her pupils did not cease after they went out from under her care. Her everready pen in poetical compositions for occasions of various kinds was in great demand and the verses were always of a beautiful sentiment, expressed in the best of language. The words for the Christian Endeavor Consecration hymn, "I'll Go Where You Want Me to Go" known and sung wherever sacred music is used, where written by Miss Brown. Her artistic ability was developed in many lines. She was a woman unusually gifted with literary talent. Miss Brown was a member of the Baptist Church. She was one of the original ten members forming Whatsoever Circle of The King's Daughters and has served as its leader. She was a member of the Ladies' Aid Society and Mission Circle, and had been a teacher in the Sunday school. A woman faithful in many things has gone to her reward. She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Nettie Johnson of Jewett City, a brother, E. Frank Brown of Woonsocket, R. I., and niece, Miss Marion H. Johnson of Willimantic. --Submitted to Leonard Ellinwood by Lillian Cathcart, local historian of Norwich, Connecticut. DNAH Archives Excerpt from letter from Julia Bair to Leonard Ellinwood, 22 August 1977: I just talked with Mrs. Samuel Cathcart, our local historian, about Mary Brown. She did live in Jewett City in the late 1800's and wrote that hymn around 1890 as you indicated. However, someone changed one word in her original poem and had it copyrighted. She was never known as Charles Gabriel. She was a teacher here in Jewett City and I talked yesterday with one of her pupils! The music of this hymn (Mary Brown's original) was written by an officer in the Jewett City Savings Bank at that time. --DNAH Archives

Mary Ann Baker

1832 - 1925 Person Name: Mary A. Baker Hymnal Number: 373 Author of "Peace! Be Still" in Yes, Lord! Baker, Mary A.. Miss Baker, who is a member of the Baptist denomination, and a resident in Chicago, Illinois, is an active worker in the temperance cause, and the author of various hymns and temperance songs.    Her most popular hymn:-— 1. Master, the tempest is raging, Peace, was written in 1874 at the request of Dr. H. R. Palmer, who desired of her several songs on the subjects of a series of Sunday School Lessons for that year. Its theme is "Christ stilling the tempest."   During the same year it was set to music by Dr. Palmer, and pub. in his Songs of Love for the Bible School, 1874. It is found in other collections, including I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs and Solos, London, 1881. Its home popularity was increased by its republication and frequent use during the illness of Pres. Garfield. It was sung at several of the funeral services held in his honour throughout the States. 2. Why perish with cold and with hunger? Invitation. This is another of her hymns set to music by I. D. Sankey, and included in his Sacred Songs and Solos, Lond., 1881. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) _______ Mary Ann Baker (sometimes known as Mary Eddy Baker), daughter of Joshua Baker and Catherine Eddy, was born 16 Sept. 1832 in Orwell, Oswego, NY. As a young child, her family moved to Branch County, Michigan. Her father died there in 1839 at age 39. A few years later, in 1843, her mother married David Ripley and had two more children, but by 1850, her mother was a single parent again with five children, living in Kinderhook, Branch, Michigan. By 1855, her mother had remarried to Ephraim Potter, and they were living in Boonville, Oneida, New York. In 1860, she and her sister Rhoda Ripley were living in Kalamazoo, Michigan, where she found work as a compositor. Some time between 1867 and 1868 (her sister Rhoda married George Ely in 1868 in Kalamazoo), she moved to Chicago, where she similarly worked as a compositor for Horton & Leonard. While in Chicago, she met composer Horatio R. Palmer and was associated with the Second Baptist Church. In 1900, she was still living in Chicago. Mary never married. In her final years, she was living in the Baptist Old People's Home in nearby Maywood, Cook County, Illinois, where she died at age 93 on 29 Sept. 1925. by Chris Fenner, 14 Feb. 2022

Henry Francis Lyte

1793 - 1847 Person Name: Henry F. Lyte Hymnal Number: 374 Author of "Abide with Me" in Yes, Lord! Lyte, Henry Francis, M.A., son of Captain Thomas Lyte, was born at Ednam, near Kelso, June 1, 1793, and educated at Portora (the Royal School of Enniskillen), and at Trinity College, Dublin, of which he was a Scholar, and where he graduated in 1814. During his University course he distinguished himself by gaining the English prize poem on three occasions. At one time he had intended studying Medicine; but this he abandoned for Theology, and took Holy Orders in 1815, his first curacy being in the neighbourhood of Wexford. In 1817, he removed to Marazion, in Cornwall. There, in 1818, he underwent a great spiritual change, which shaped and influenced the whole of his after life, the immediate cause being the illness and death of a brother clergyman. Lyte says of him:— "He died happy under the belief that though he had deeply erred, there was One whose death and sufferings would atone for his delinquencies, and be accepted for all that he had incurred;" and concerning himself he adds:— "I was greatly affected by the whole matter, and brought to look at life and its issue with a different eye than before; and I began to study my Bible, and preach in another manner than I had previously done." From Marazion he removed, in 1819, to Lymington, where he composed his Tales on the Lord's Prayer in verse (pub. in 1826); and in 1823 he was appointed Perpetual Curate of Lower Brixham, Devon. That appointment he held until his death, on Nov. 20, 1847. His Poems of Henry Vaughan, with a Memoir, were published in 1846. His own Poetical works were:— (1) Poems chiefly Religious 1833; 2nd ed. enlarged, 1845. (2) The Spirit of the Psalms, 1834, written in the first instance for use in his own Church at Lower Brixham, and enlarged in 1836; (3) Miscellaneous Poems (posthumously) in 1868. This last is a reprint of the 1845 ed. of his Poems, with "Abide with me" added. (4) Remains, 1850. Lyte's Poems have been somewhat freely drawn upon by hymnal compilers; but by far the larger portion of his hymns found in modern collections are from his Spirit of the Psalms. In America his hymns are very popular. In many instances, however, through mistaking Miss Auber's (q. v.) Spirit of the Psalms, 1829, for his, he is credited with more than is his due. The Andover Sabbath Hymn Book, 1858, is specially at fault in this respect. The best known and most widely used of his compositions are "Abide with me, fast falls the eventide;” “Far from my heavenly home;" "God of mercy, God of grace;" "Pleasant are Thy courts above;" "Praise, my soul, the King of heaven;" and "There is a safe and secret place." These and several others are annotated under their respective first lines: the rest in common use are:— i. From his Poems chiefly Religious, 1833 and 1845. 1. Above me hangs the silent sky. For Use at Sea. 2. Again, 0 Lord, I ope mine eyes. Morning. 3. Hail to another Year. New Year. 4. How good, how faithful, Lord, art Thou. Divine care of Men. 5. In tears and trials we must sow (1845). Sorrow followed by Joy. 6. My [our] rest is in heaven, my [our] rest is not here. Heaven our Home. 7. 0 Lord, how infinite Thy love. The Love of God in Christ. 8. Omniscient God, Thine eye divine. The Holy Ghost Omniscient. 9. The leaves around me falling. Autumn. 10. The Lord hath builded for Himself. The Universe the Temple of God. 11. Vain were all our toil and labour. Success is of God. 12. When at Thy footstool, Lord, I bend. Lent. 13. When earthly joys glide swift away. Ps. cii. 14. Wilt Thou return to me, O Lord. Lent. 15. With joy we hail the sacred day. Sunday. ii. From his Spirit of the Psalms, 1834. 16. Be merciful to us, O God. Ps. lvii. 17. Blest is the man who knows the Lord. Ps. cxii. 18. Blest is the man whose spirit shares. Ps. xli. 19. From depths of woe to God I cry. Ps. cxxxx. 20. Gently, gently lay Thy rod. Ps. vi. 21. Glorious Shepherd of the sheep. Ps. xxiii. 22. Glory and praise to Jehovah on high. Ps. xxix. 23. God in His Church is known. Ps. lxxvi. 24. God is our Refuge, tried and proved. Ps. xlvi. 25. Great Source of my being. Ps. lxxiii. 26. Hear, O Lord, our supplication. Ps. lxiv. 27. How blest the man who fears the Lord. Ps.cxxviii. 28. Humble, Lord, my haughty spirit. Ps. cxxxi. 29. In this wide, weary world of care. Ps. cxxxii. 30. In vain the powers of darkness try. Ps.lii. 31. Jehovah speaks, let man be awed. Ps. xlix. 32. Judge me, O Lord, and try my heart. Ps. xxvi. 33. Judge me, O Lord, to Thee I fly. Ps. xliii. 34. Lord, I have sinned, but O forgive. Ps. xli. 35. Lord, my God, in Thee I trust. Ps. vii. 36. Lord of the realms above, Our Prophet, &c. Ps.xlv. 37. Lone amidst the dead and dying. Ps. lxii. 38. Lord God of my salvation. Ps. lxxxviii. 39. Lord, I look to Thee for all. Ps. xxxi. 40. Lord, I would stand with thoughtful eye. Ps. lxix. 41. Lord, my God, in Thee I trust. Ps. vii. 42. My God, my King, Thy praise I sing. Ps. cviii. 43. My God, what monuments I see. Ps. xxxvi. 44. My spirit on [to] Thy care. Ps. xxxi. 45. My trust is in the Lord. Ps. xi. 46. Not unto us, Almighty Lord [God]. Ps. cxv. 47. O God of glory, God of grace. Ps. xc. 48. O God of love, how blest are they. Ps. xxxvii. 49. O God of love, my God Thou art. Ps. lxiii. 50. O God of truth and grace. Ps. xviii. 51. O had I, my Saviour, the wings of a dove. Ps. lv. 52. O how blest the congregation. Ps. lxxxix. 53. O how safe and [how] happy he. Ps. xci. 54. O plead my cause, my Saviour plead. Ps. xxxv. 55. O praise the Lord, 'tis sweet to raise. Ps. cxlvii. 56. O praise the Lord; ye nations, pour. Ps. cxvii. 57. O praise ye the Lord With heart, &c. Ps. cxlix. 58. O that the Lord's salvation. Ps. xiv. 59. O Thou Whom thoughtless men condemn. Ps. xxxvi. 60. Of every earthly stay bereft. Ps. lxxiv. 61. Our hearts shall praise Thee, God of love. Ps. cxxxviii. 62. Pilgrims here on earth and strangers. Ps. xvi. 63. Praise for Thee, Lord, in Zion waits. Ps. lxv. 64. Praise to God on high be given. Ps. cxxxiv. 65. Praise ye the Lord, His servants, raise. Ps. cxiii. 66. Redeem'd from guilt, redeem'd from fears. Ps. cxvi. 67. Save me by Thy glorious name. Ps. liv. 68. Shout, ye people, clap your hands. Ps. xlvii. 69. Sing to the Lord our might. Ps. lxxxi. 70. Strangers and pilgrims here below. Ps. cix. 71. Sweet is the solemn voice that calls. Ps. cxxii. 72. The Church of God below. Ps. lxxxvii. 73. The Lord is King, let earth be glad. Ps. xcvii. 74. The Lord is on His throne. Ps. xciii. 75. The Lord is our Refuge, the Lord is our Guide. Ps. xlvii. 76. The mercies of my God and King. Ps. lxxxix. 77. The Lord Who died on earth for men. Ps. xxi. 78. Tis a pleasant thing to fee. Ps. cxxxiii. 79. Thy promise, Lord, is perfect peace. Ps. iii. 80. Unto Thee I lift mine [my] eyes. Ps. cxxiii. 81. Whom shall [should] we love like Thee? Ps. xviii. Lyte's versions of the Psalms are criticised where their sadness, tenderness and beauty are set forth. His hymns in the Poems are characterized by the same features, and rarely swell out into joy and gladness. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Lyte, Henry Francis, p. 706, i. Additional versions of Psalms are in common use:-- 1. Lord, a thousand foes surround us. Psalms lix. 2. Praise, Lord, for Thee in Zion waits. Psalms lxv. 3. The Christian like his Lord of old. Psalms cxl. 4. The Lord of all my Shepherd is. Psalms xxiii. 5. The Lord of heaven to earth is come. Psalms xcviii. 6. Thy mercy, Lord, the sinner's hope. Psalms xxxvi. 7. To Thee, O Lord, in deep distress. Psalms cxlii. Sometimes given as "To God I turned in wild distress." 8. Uphold me, Lord, too prone to stray. Psalms i. 9. When Jesus to our [my] rescue came. Psalms cxxvi. These versions appeared in the 1st edition of Lyte's Spirit of the Psalms, 1834. It must be noted that the texts of the 1834, the 1836, and the 3rd ed., 1858, vary considerably, but Lyte was not responsible for the alterations and omissions in the last, which was edited by another hand for use at St. Mark's, Torquay. Lyte's version of Psalms xxix., "Glory and praise to Jehovah on high" (p. 706, ii., 22), first appeared in his Poems, 1st ed., 1833, p. 25. Read also No. 39 as "Lord, I look for all to Thee." --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Pages


Export as CSV