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Jessie Brown Pounds

1861 - 1921 Person Name: Jessie B. Pounds Hymnal Number: 106 Author of "I Know That My Redeemer Liveth" in Yes, Lord! Jessie Brown Pounds was born in Hiram, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland on 31 August 1861. She was not in good health when she was a child so she was taught at home. She began to write verses for the Cleveland newspapers and religious weeklies when she was fifteen. After an editor of a collection of her verses noted that some of them would be well suited for church or Sunday School hymns, J. H. Fillmore wrote to her asking her to write some hymns for a book he was publishing. She then regularly wrote hymns for Fillmore Brothers. She worked as an editor with Standard Publishing Company in Cincinnati from 1885 to 1896, when she married Rev. John E. Pounds, who at that time was a pastor of the Central Christian Church in Indianapolis. A memorable phrase would come to her, she would write it down in her notebook. Maybe a couple months later she would write out the entire hymn. She is the author of nine books, about fifty librettos for cantatas and operettas and of nearly four hundred hymns. Her hymn "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere" was sung at President McKinley's funeral. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

M. A. Kidder

1820 - 1905 Person Name: Mary A. Kidder Hymnal Number: 173 Author of "Is My Name Written There?" in Yes, Lord! Used pseudonym: Minnie Waters ========== Mary Ann Pepper Kidder USA 1820-1905. Born at Boston, MA, she was a poet, writing from an early age. She went blind at age 16, but miraculously recovered her sight the following year. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1844 she married Ellis Usher Kidder, a music publisher, working for the firm founded by his brother, Andrew, and they had three children: Mary Frances, Edward, and Walter. That year they moved to Charlestown, MA, and in 1857 to New York City. When the American Civil War broke out, Ellis enlisted in the 4th Regiment as a private. Mustered in for two years of service, he died of disease in 1862, six days after participating in the Battle of Antietam. Left alone, with three children to care for, her writing hobby became a much needed source of income. She began writing short stories, poems, and articles and submitting them to various magazines and newspapers. For over 25 years she wrote a poem each week to the New York Ledger and others to the Waverly Magazine and New York Fireside Companion. She also frequently contributed to the New York Weekly, Demorest’s Monthly, and Packard’s Monthly. It was estimated that she earned over $80,000 from her verse. She lost two of her children when Walter drowned while swimming, and 18 years later, her daughter, Mary Frances, a talented sketch artist, died of heart disease. Mary Ann was active in the temperance movement and one of the first members of the Sorosis club, a women’s club. She loved children and animals. Her daughter-in-law described her as gentle, patient, always serene, and a good listener. She was fiercely independent and refused to lean on others for support, mentally or materially. Mary Ann lived for 46 years in New York City. She is said to have written 1000+ hymn lyrics. She died at Chelsea, MA, at the home of her brother, Daniel, having lived there two years. It is said that her jet-black hair never turned gray, which was a real grief to her, as she longed for that in advancing age. John Perry =========== Kidder, Mary Ann, née Pepper, who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, March 16, 1820, is the author of "Lord, I care not for riches" (Name in the Book of Life desired), and "We shall sleep, but not for ever" (Hope of the Resurrection), both of which are in I. D. Sankey's Sacred Songs & Solos, 1878. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ===================== Kidder, Mary Ann, née Pepper, p. 1576, i. Mrs. Kidder died at Chelsea, Mass., Nov. 25, 1905. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and resided for 46 years in New York City. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Carrie Ellis Breck

1855 - 1934 Person Name: Carrie E. Breck Hymnal Number: 174 Author of "Face to Face" in Yes, Lord! Carrie Ellis Breck was born 22 January 1855 in Vermont and raised in a Christian home. She later moved to Vineland, New Jersy, and then to Portland, Oregon. She wrote verse and prose for religious and household publications, In 1884 she married Frank A. Breck. She has written between fourteen and fifteen hundred hymns. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916) See also Mrs. Frank A. Breck.

Judson W. Van DeVenter

1855 - 1939 Person Name: J. W. Van DeVenter Hymnal Number: 180 Author of "Looking This Way" in Yes, Lord! Judson W. Van DeVenter was born 15 December 1855 on a farm near the village of Dundee, Michigan. He was educated in the country and village schools, and at Hillsdale College. He later moved to St. Petersburg, Florida. He wrote about 100 hymns. Dianne Shapiro, from "The Singers and Their Songs: sketches of living gospel hymn writers" by Charles Hutchinson Gabriel (Chicago: The Rodeheaver Company, 1916)

Francis Bottome

1823 - 1894 Person Name: Frank Bottome Hymnal Number: 190 Author of "The Comforter Has Come" in Yes, Lord! Bottome, F., S.T.D., was born in Derbyshire, England, May 26, 1823. In 1850, having removed to America, he entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopalian Church; and in 1872 he received the degree of S.T.D. from Dickinson's College, Carlisle, Penn. In addition to assisting in the compilation of B. P. Smith's Gospel Hymns, London, 1872: Centenary Singer, 1869; Hound Lake, 1872, he has written:— 1. Come, Holy Ghost, all sacred fire. Invocation of the Holy Spirit. Appeared in R. P. Smith's Gospel Hymns, 1872. It is in several collections, including the Ohio Hymn Book of the Evangelical Association, 1881, No. 364. 2. Full salvation, full salvation. Joy of full Salvation. Written in 1871, and published in a collection by Dr. Cullis of Boston, 1873. Also in the Ohio Hymn Book, 1881, No. 384. 3. Love of Jesus, all divine. Love of Jesus. Written in 1872, and published in his Hound Lake, 1872. It is in several collections. 4. O bliss of the purified, bliss of the free. Sanctification. Written in 1869, and published in the Revivalist, and numerous hymn-books in America, including the Ohio Hymn Book as above, 1881, No. 477, &c. His hymns, "Sweet rest in Jesus"; and "Oneness in Jesus," are also found in several collections for evangelistic services. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Edmund H. Sears

1810 - 1876 Hymnal Number: 211 Author of "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" in Yes, Lord! Edmund Hamilton Sears was born in Berkshire [County], Massachusetts, in 1810; graduated at Union College, Schenectady, in 1834, and at the Theological School of Harvard University, in 1837. He became pastor of the Unitarian Society in Wayland, Mass., in 1838; removed to Lancaster in 1840; but on account of ill health was obliged to retire from the active duties of the ministry in 1847; since then, residing in Wayland, he devoted himself to literature. He has published several works. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872 ======================= Sears, Edmund Hamilton, D.D., son of Joseph Sears, was born at Sandisfield, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, April 6, 1810, and educated at Union College, Schenectady, N.Y., where he graduated in 1834; and at the Theological School at Cambridge. In 1838 he became pastor of the First Church (Unitarian) at Wayland, Massachusetts; then at Lancaster in the same State, in 1840; again at Wayland, in 1847; and finally at Weston, Massachusetts, in 1865. He died at Weston, Jan. 14, 1876. He published:— (1) Regeneration, 1854; (2) Pictures of the Olden Time, 1857; (3) Athanasia, or Foregleams of Immortality, 1858, enlarged ed., 1872; (4) The Fourth Gospel the Heart of Christ; (5) Sermons and Songs of the Christian Life, 1875, in which his hymns are collected. Also co-editor of the Monthly Religious Magazine. Of his hymns the following are in common use:— 1. Calm on the listening ear of night. Christmas. This hymn was first published in its original form, in the Boston Observer, 1834; afterwards, in the Christian Register, in 1835; subsequently it was emended by the author, and, as thus emended, was reprinted entire in the Monthly Magazine, vol. xxxv. Its use is extensive. 2. It came upon the midnight clear. Christmas. "Rev. Dr. Morison writes to us, Sears's second Christmas hymn was sent to me as editor of the Christian Register, I think, in December, 1849. I was very much delighted with it, and before it came out in the Register, read it at a Christmas celebration of Dr. Lunt's Sunday School in Quincy. I always feel that, however poor my Christmas sermon may be, the reading and singing of this hymn are enough to make up for all deficiences.'" 3. Ho, ye that rest beneath the rock. Charitable Meetings on behalf of Children. Appeared in Longfellow and Johnson's Hymns of the Spirit, Boston, 1864, in 2 stanzas of 8 lines. Dr. Sears's two Christmas hymns rank with the best on that holy season in the English language. Although a member of the Unitarian body, his views were rather Swedenborgian than Unitarian. He held always to the absolute Divinity of Christ. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

John H. Hopkins

1820 - 1891 Person Name: John H. Hopkins, Jr. Hymnal Number: 213 Author of "We Three Kings of Orient Are" in Yes, Lord! John Henry Hopkins, Jr MA USA 1820-1891. Born in Pittsburgh, PA, having 12 siblings, the son of pioneer parents (his father from Dublin, his mother from Hamburg) he became an ecclesiologist. His father had been an ironmaster, school teacher, lawyer, priest and second Episcopal Bishop of Vermont, (becoming presiding bishop in 1865). When his father founded the Vermont Episcopal Institute, he needed an assistant to help run it, so he picked his son to become a tutor and disciplinarian. The younger Hopkins played the flute and bugle in the school orchestra and also taught Sunday school. John Henry reflected the artistic talents of both parents in music, poetry, and art. After graduating from the University of Vermont in 1839, he returned to help his father with the school, but a financial crisis hit that year and the school had to close. He worked as a reported in New York City while studying law. He developed a throat ailment and went south to be in a warmer climate. From 1842-1844 he tutored the children of Episcopal Bishop Elliott of Savannah, GA, returning to take his M.A. from Vermont in 1845. He graduated from General Theological Seminary in 1850 and was ordained a deacon, serving as first instructor in church music at the Seminary. He founded and edited the “Church Journal” from 1853 to 1868. Interested in New York’s Ecclesiological Society, his artistic talents were apparent in designing stained-glass windows, episcopal seals, and a variety of other church ornaments. At the same time, his musical talents led to the writing and composing of a number of fine hymns and tunes, as well as anthems and services. He was ordained a priest in 1872, and was Rector of Trinity Church, Plattsburg, NY, from 1872-1876, then of Christ Episcopal Church in Williamsport, PA, from 1876-1887. He helped get the building debt paid off by 1879 with(in 10 years of its construction). During his time there a Sunday school building was also erected, having steam heat and a tiled floor. He designed some of the church furniture and bishop periphernalia as well as wrought iron tombs in Wildwood Cemetery. He also helped design two other church buildings in the area. A man of many talents, he was much beloved as a scholar, writer, preacher, controvertialist, musician, poet, and artist, excelling in all that he did. Totally devoted to his parish people, he especially loved children and was kind to anyone in need. He was considered very down-to-earth. He delivered the eulogy at the funeral of President Usysses S Grant in 1885. He was considered a great developer of hymnody in the Episcopal Church in the mid-19th century. His “Carols, hymns, and songs,”, published in 1863, had a 4th edition in 1883. In 1887 he edited “Great hymns of the church”. He wrote a biography of his father (the life of John Henry Hopkins, S.T.D.) He never married. He died at Hudson, NY. John Perry ======================= Hopkins, John Henry, D.D., Jun., son of J. H. Hopkins, sometime Bishop of Vermont, was born at Pittsburg, Pa., Oct. 28, 1820, educated at the University of Vermont, ordained in 1850, Rector of Christ's Church, Williamsport, Pa., 1876, and died at Troy, New York, Aug. 13, 1891. He published Poems by the Wayside written during more than Forty Years, N.Y., James Pott, 1883; and Carols, Hymns, and Songs, 1862; 3rd ed. 1882. Of his hymns the following are in common use: 1. Blow on, thou [ye] mighty Wind. Missions. 2. Come with us, O blessed Jesus. Holy Communion. 3. Glory to God the Father be. (Dated 1867.) Holy Trinity. 4. God hath made the moon whose beam. (Dated 1840.) Duty. 5. Lord, now round Thy Church behold. (Dated 1867.) For the Reunion of Christendom. These hymns are in his Poems by the Wayside, 1883. In the same volume there are translations of the O Antiphons. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ============== Hopkins, J. H., p. 1571, ii. The following additional hymns by him are in the American Hymnal, revised and enlarged .... Protestant Episcopal Church. . . U.S.A., 1892:— 1. God of our fathers, bless this our land. National Hymn. 2. When from the east the wise men came. Epiphany. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Joseph Mohr

1792 - 1848 Hymnal Number: 217 Author of "Silent Night, Holy Night" in Yes, Lord! Joseph Mohr was born into a humble family–his mother was a seamstress and his father, an army musketeer. A choirboy in Salzburg Cathedral as a youth, Mohr studied at Salzburg University and was ordained in the Roman Catholic Church in 1815. Mohr was a priest in various churches near Salzburg, including St. Nicholas Church. He spent his later years in Hintersee and Wagrein. Bert Polman ================= Mohr, Joseph, was born at Salzburg, Austria, on Dec. 11, 1792. After being ordained priest on Aug. 21, 1815, by the Roman Catholic Bishop of Salzburg, he was successively assistant at Ramsau and at Laufen; then coadjutor at Kuchl, at Golling, at Vigaun, at Adnet, and at Authering; then Vicar-Substitute at Hof and at Hintersee--all in the diocese of Salzburg. In 1828 he was appointed Vicar at Hintersee, and in 1837 at Wagrein, near St. Johann. He died at Wagrein, Dec. 4, 1848. The only hymn by him translated into English is:— Stille Nacht! heilige Nacht! Christmas. This pretty little carol was written for Christmas, 1818, while Mohr was assistant clergyman at Laufen, on the Salza, near Salzburg, and was set to music (as in the Garland of Songs) by Franz Gruber, then schoolmaster at the neighbouring village of Arnsdorf (b. Nov. 25, 1787, at Hochburg near Linz, died June 7, 1863, as organist at Hallein, near Salzburg). What is apparently the original form is given by 0. Kraus, 1879, p. 608, in 3 stanzas of 6 lines, and in Dr. Wichern's Unsere Lieder, Hamburg, 1844, No. 111. Another form, also in 3 stanzas of 6 lines, is in T. Fliedner's Lieder-Buch für Kleinkinder-Schulen, Kaiserswerth, 1842, No. 115, and the Evangelical Kinder Gesang-Buch, Basel, 1867. The translations are from the text of 1844. 1. Holy night! peaceful night! All is dark. By Miss J. M. Campbell in C. S. Bere's Garland of Songs, 1863, and thence in Hymns & Carols, London, 1871. 2. Silent night! hallowed night. Land and deep. This is No. 131 in the Christian Hymn Book, Cincinnati, 1865. It is suggested by, rather than a translation of the German. 3. Holy night! peaceful night! Through the darkness. This is No. 8 in J. Barnby's Original Tunes to Popular Hymns, Novello, N. D., 1869; repeated in Laudes Domini, N.Y., 1884, No. 340. 4. Silent night! holy night! All is calm. This is in C. L. Hutchins's Sunday School Hymnal, 1871 (1878, p. 198), and the Sunday School Hymn Book of the Gen. Council of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, 1873, No. 65. 5. Peaceful night, all things sleep. This is No. 17, in Carols for St Stephen's Church, Kirkstall, Leeds, 1872. 6. Silent night, holiest night. All asleep. By Dr. A. Edersheim, in the Sunday at Home, Dec. 18, 1875, repeated in the Church Sunday School Hymn Book, 1879, No. 35. 7. Silent night! holy night! Slumber reigns. By W. T. Matson, as No. 132, in Dr. Allon's Children's Worship, 1878. 8. Still the night, holy the night! Sleeps the world. By Stopford A. Brooke, in his Christian Hymns, 1881, No. 55. Translations not in common use:-- (1) "Stilly night, Holy night, Silent stars," by Miss E. E. S. Elliott, privately printed for the choir of St. Mark's, Brighton, about 1858, but first published in the Church Missionary Juvenile Instructor, 1871, p. 198. Also in her Tune Book for Under the Pillow, 1880. (2) "Holy night! calmly bright," by Mary D. Moultrie in Hymns & Lyrics by Gerard Moultrie, 1867, p. 42. (3) "Silent night, holiest night! Moonbeams," by C. T. Brooks, In his Poems, Boston, U. S., 1885, p. 218. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================ Mohr, Joseph, p. 760, ii. The translation "Stilly night, starry and bright," in Farmer's Glees & Songs for High Schools, 1881, p. 36, is by Archdeacon Farrar. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Philip Doddridge

1702 - 1751 Hymnal Number: 418 Author of "Great God, We Sing That Mighty Hand" in Yes, Lord! Philip Doddridge (b. London, England, 1702; d. Lisbon, Portugal, 1751) belonged to the Non-conformist Church (not associated with the Church of England). Its members were frequently the focus of discrimination. Offered an education by a rich patron to prepare him for ordination in the Church of England, Doddridge chose instead to remain in the Non-conformist Church. For twenty years he pastored a poor parish in Northampton, where he opened an academy for training Non-conformist ministers and taught most of the subjects himself. Doddridge suffered from tuberculosis, and when Lady Huntington, one of his patrons, offered to finance a trip to Lisbon for his health, he is reputed to have said, "I can as well go to heaven from Lisbon as from Northampton." He died in Lisbon soon after his arrival. Doddridge wrote some four hundred hymn texts, generally to accompany his sermons. These hymns were published posthumously in Hymns, Founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures (1755); relatively few are still sung today. Bert Polman ======================== Doddridge, Philip, D.D., was born in London, June 26, 1702. His grandfather was one of the ministers under the Commonwealth, who were ejected in 1662. His father was a London oilman. He was offered by the Duchess of Bedford an University training for ordination in the Church of England, but declined it. He entered Mr. Jennings's non-conformist seminary at Kibworth instead; preached his first sermon at Hinckley, to which Mr. Jennings had removed his academy. In 1723 he was chosen pastor at Kibworth. In 1725 he changed his residence to Market Harborough, still ministering at Kibworth. The settled work of his life as a preceptor and divine began in 1729, with his appointment to the Castle Hill Meeting at Northampton, and continued till in the last stage of consumption. He sailed to Lisbon, in 1751, where he died October 26, the same year. Two hundred pupils in all, gathered from England, Scotland and Holland, were prepared in his seminary, chiefly for the dissenting ministry, but partly for professions. The wide range of subjects, including daily readings in Hebrew and Greek, Algebra, Trigonometry, Watts' Logic, outline of Philosophy, and copious Divinity, is itself a proof of Doddridge's learning. He was presented with his D.D. degree by the University of Aberdeen. His fame as a divine, combined with his wide sympathies and gentle, unaffected goodness, won for him the friendship of Watts, Col. Gardiner and Hervey, and the esteem of Seeker and Warburton. He welcomed the work of Wesley and Whitefield, and entertained the latter on his visit to Northampton. His Rise and Progress of Religion in the Soul and The Family Expositor both did good work in their day. For criticism of his hymns see English Hymnody, Early, § XIV. [Rev. H. Leigh Bennett, M.A.] After Dr. Doddridge's death his hymns were published by his friend Job Orton, in 1755, as:— "Hymns founded on Various Texts in the Holy Scriptures. By the late Reverend Philip Doddridge, D.D. Published from the Author's Manuscript by Job Orton . . . Salop. Printed by J. Eddowes and J. Cotton, &c. MDCCLV." Concerning the text of the hymns, Orton says in his Preface:— "There may perhaps be some improprieties, owing to my not being able to read the author's manuscript in particular places, and being obliged, without a poetical genius, to supply those deficiencies, whereby the beauty of the stanza may be greatly defaced, though the sense is preserved." The 1st edition contained 370 hymns; the 2nd, 1759, 374; and the 3rd, 1766, and later editions, 375. In 1839 Doddridge's great-grandson re-edited the hymns from the original manuscript and published the same as:— Scriptural Hymns by the Rev. Philip Doddridge, D.D. New and corrected edition containing many hymns never before printed. Edited from the Original Documents by the Author's great-grandson, John Doddridge Humphreys, Esq. Lond. Darton & Clark, 1839. This work contains 22 additional hymns. The text differs in many instances from Orton's, but these changes have not come into common use. In addition to the manuscript used by Orton and J. D. Humphreys, another containing 100 hymns (five of which are not in any edition of the Hymns), all in the author's handwriting, and most of them dated, is referred to in this Dictionary as the "D. Manuscripts." It is the property of Mr. W. S. Booker and family. A manuscript, not in Doddridge's handwriting, of 77 "Hymns by P. Doddridge, Mar. 16, 1739/1740," is in the possession of Mr. W. T. Brooke. The existence of these manuscripts is accounted for from the fact that Doddridge's hymns were freely circulated in manuscript during his lifetime. It is from his correspondence with R. Blair (q.v.) that the few compositions traceable to him in the Scottish Trans. & Paraphrases were derived. The hymns by Doddridge which have attained to the greatest popularity are:— “Awake, my soul, stretch every nerve"; " Do not I love Thee, O my Lord? " "Grace 'tis a charming sound”; " Hark, the glad sound, the Saviour comes"; "My God, and is Thy table spread?" "O happy day, that fixed my choice"; "O God of Jacob [Bethel], by Whose hand”; " See Israel's gentle Shepherd stand"; "Ye servants of the Lord." These hymns, with many besides, are annotated under their respective first lines. Of the rest, taken from the Hymns, &c, 1755, the following are also in common use:— 1. Behold the gloomy vale. Death anticipated. 2. Behold the Great Physician stands. Christ the Physician. 3. Captives of Israel, hear. Spiritual Deliverance. 4. Eternal God, our wondering souls. Enoch's Piety and Translation. 5. Eternal Source of life and thought. Subjection to the Father. G. Exalted Prince of Life, we own. Christ the Prince and Saviour. 7. Father Divine, the Saviour cried. Christ's Submission to the Father. 8. Father Divine, Thy piercing eye. Secret Prayer. 9. Father of mercies, send Thy grace. Sympathy. The Good Samaritan. 10. Go, saith the Lord, proclaim my grace. Forgiveness. 11. God of Eternity, from Thee. Redeeming the Time. 12. God of my life, through all its [my] days. Praising God continually. 13. God. of salvation, we adore. Praise to God for Redemption. 14. Great Father of mankind. Gentiles brought into the Church. 15. Great God, we sing that mighty hand. The New Tear. 16. Great Leader of Thine Israel's host. During Persecution. 17. Great Lord of angels, we adore. Ordination. 18. Great Spirit of immortal love. Purity of Heart desired. 19. Great Teacher of Thy Church, we own. The Divine Precepts. 20. Hail, everlasting Prince of Peace. Sympathy. 21. Hail to the Prince of life and peace. Praise to Christ. 22. Hear, gracious [Saviour] Sovereign, from Thy throne. The Blessings of the Holy Spirit desired. 23. How gentle God's commands. God's Care of His Own. 24. How rich Thy favours, God of grace. God and His Living Temple. 25. How swift the torrent flows [rolls]. Our Fathers, where are they? 26. Jesus the Lord, our souls adore. Christ the Forerunner. 27. Jesus, we own Thy Sovereign hand. Christ to be fully known hereafter. 28. Loud let the tuneful trumpet sound. Gospel Jubilee. 29. My gracious Lord, I own Thy right. Life in Jesus. 30. My [Dear] Saviour, I am [we are] Thine. Joined to Christ through the Spirit. 31. My soul, with all thy waking powers. The Choice of Moses. 32. Now let our voices join. Singing in the ways of God. 33. 0 injured Majesty of heaven. Lent. 34. 0 Zion, tune thy voice. Glory of the Church of Christ. 35. Peace, 'tis the Lord Jehovah's hand. Resignation. 36. Praise the Lord of boundless might. The Father of Lights. 37. Praise to Thy Name, Eternal God. Growth in Grace desired. 38. Remark, my soul, the narrow bounds. The New Year. 39. Repent, the Voice celestial cries. Lent. 40. Return, my roving heart, return. Heart communing. 41. Salvation, O melodious sound. God our Salvation. 42. Saviour of men, and Lord of love. Ministry and Death of Christ. 43. Searcher of hearts, before Thy face. Peter to Simon Magus. 44. Shepherd of Israel, Thou dost keep. Induction or Settlement of a Minister. 45. Shine forth, eternal Source of light. Knowledge of God desired. 46. Shine on our souls, eternal God. Sunday. 47. Sing, ye redeemed of the Lord. Joy on the Homeward Way. 48. Sovereign of life, before Thine eye. Life and Death in God's hands. 49. The darkened sky, how thick it lours. Sorrow followed by Joy. 50. The day approacheth, O my soul. Judgment anticipated. 51. The King of heaven His table spreads. The Gospel Feast. 52. The promises I sing. The unchanging promises of God. 53. The swift-declining day. Walk in the Light. 54. These mortal joys, how soon they fade. Treasures, Perishable and Eternal. 55. Thy judgments cry aloud. Retributive Providence. 56. Thy presence, Everlasting God. Omnipresence of the Father. 57. 'Tis mine, the covenant of His grace. Death anticipated. 58. To Thee, my God; my days are known. Life under the eye of God. 59. Tomorrow, Lord, is Thine. Uncertainty of Life. 60. Triumphant Lord, Thy goodness reigns. The Divine Goodness. 61. Triumphant Zion, lift thy head. The Church Purified and Guarded. 62. Unite my roving thoughts, unite. Peace. 63. What mysteries, Lord, in Thee combine. Christ, the First and Last. 64. While on the verge of life I stand. Death anticipated with Joy. 65. With ecstacy of Joy. Christ the Living Stone. 66. Ye golden lamps of heaven, farewell. Heaven opening. 67. Ye hearts with youthful vigour warm. The Young encouraged. 68. Ye humble souls, that seek the Lord. Easter. 69. Ye sons of men, with joy record. Praise of the Works of God. 70. Yes, the Redeemer rose. Easter In Dr. Hatfield's Church HymnBook, N. Y., 1872, Nos. 9, 12, 14, 15, 21, 23, 25, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 39, 40, 44, 47, 51, 61, 64, 65, 67, 69, 70, as above, are dated 1740. What authority there may be for this date we cannot say, these hymns not being in any “D. MSS." with which we are acquainted, and no dates are given in the Hymns, &c, 1755. Some later American editors have copied this date from Dr. Hatfield. Doddridge's hymns are largely used by Unitarians both in Great Britain and America. As might be expected, the Congregationalists also draw freely from his stores. The Baptists come next. In the hymnals of the Church of England the choicest, only are in use. Taken together, over one-third of his hymns are in common usage at the present time. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================ Doddridge, Philip, D.D. At p. 305 an account is given of a manuscript volume of Doddridge's Hymns, which is the property of the Rooker family. Since that article was written another manuscript vol. has been found. It was the property of Lady Frances Gardiner, née Erskine, an intimate friend of Doddridge, and wife of Col. Gardiner. It is a copy of the Rooker manuscipt, with the revised text, as in the margin of that ms., and is in Doddridge's hand¬writing. It was from this manuscript that the Doddridge hymns were taken for the Scottish Translationsand Paraphrases, 1745. Additional hymns by Dr. Doddridge still in common use include:— 1. My God, how cheerful is the sound. All in Christ. 2. My Saviour, let me hear Thy voice. Pardon desired. 3. My soul, triumphant in the Lord. Divine Guidance assured. 4. No «iore, ye wise, your wisdom boast. Glorying in God alone. From Hymns, No. 128. 5. Now be that Sacrifice survey'd. Christ our Sacrifice. 6. 0 Israel, blest beyond compare. Happiness of God's Israel. 7. Our fathers, where are they? Considering the Past. From Hymns, No. 164. 8. Praise to the Lord on high. Missions. 9. Praise to the radiant Source of bliss. Praise for Divine Guidance. 10. Return, my soul, and seek thy rest. Rest in Jesus. 11. Salvation doth to God belong. National Thanksgiving. 12. Sovereign of Life, I own Thy hand. On Recovery from Sickness. 13. The sepulchres, how thick they stand. Burial. 14. There is a Shepherd kind and strong. The Good Shepherd. From Hymns, No. 216. 15. Wait on the Lord, ye heirs of hope. Waiting on God. 16. We bless the eternal Source of light. Christ's care of the Church. 17. With transport, Lord, our souls proclaim. Immutability of Christ. 18. Ye mourning saints, whose streaming tears. Death and Burial. These all appeared in Dr. Doddridge's Hymns, 1755. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Gloria Gaither

b. 1942 Hymnal Number: 444 Alterer (st. 4) of "O Happy Day" in Yes, Lord! Gloria Gaither (born March 4, 1942) is a Christian songwriter, author, speaker, editor, and academic. She is the wife of Bill Gaither and also sang in the Bill Gaither Trio, one of the most influential groups in recent Christian music. She was born Gloria Lee Sickal in 1942 in Michigan, a daughter of pastor Lee Sickal and Dorothy Sickal. She spent most of her childhood and high school career in the Battle Creek area of Michigan, working a brief time for the Kellogg Company. When Sickal graduated from high school, she attended Anderson University in Anderson, Indiana. There, she triple majored in English, French, and Sociology. Upon her graduation, she took a job at Alexandria Monroe High School as a French teacher. There, she met Bill Gaither, who was teaching English at the time. She married Gaither in 1962, and they began writing songs recreationally. By the end of the 1960s, Gloria, Bill, and his brother Danny Gaither were touring steadily, as the Bill Gaither Trio. After touring with the Bill Gaither Trio, Gaither drew her focus to the Gaither Homecoming series. She has been an active presence in every video production. Gaither is currently the scriptwriter and narrator for the Homecoming series. In 1991, she attended Ball State University and received a Master of Arts in Literature. She taught as an adjunct professor at Anderson University for periods in the late 80s and late 90s. In 1996, she spearheaded the creation of Gaither Family Reources in Alexandria, Indiana, and currently serves as co-owner and managing director. In 2002, Gaither launched Homecoming:

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