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George P. Simmonds

1890 - 1991 Translator (Spanish) of "Breathe on Me, Breath of God" in Community of Christ Sings Used pseudonyms G Paul S., J. Paul Simon, and J. Pablo Símon

Charles Wesley

1707 - 1788 Person Name: Charles Wesley, 1707-1788 Author of "A Charge to Keep I Have" in His Fullness Songs Charles Wesley, M.A. was the great hymn-writer of the Wesley family, perhaps, taking quantity and quality into consideration, the great hymn-writer of all ages. Charles Wesley was the youngest son and 18th child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley, and was born at Epworth Rectory, Dec. 18, 1707. In 1716 he went to Westminster School, being provided with a home and board by his elder brother Samuel, then usher at the school, until 1721, when he was elected King's Scholar, and as such received his board and education free. In 1726 Charles Wesley was elected to a Westminster studentship at Christ Church, Oxford, where he took his degree in 1729, and became a college tutor. In the early part of the same year his religious impressions were much deepened, and he became one of the first band of "Oxford Methodists." In 1735 he went with his brother John to Georgia, as secretary to General Oglethorpe, having before he set out received Deacon's and Priest's Orders on two successive Sundays. His stay in Georgia was very short; he returned to England in 1736, and in 1737 came under the influence of Count Zinzendorf and the Moravians, especially of that remarkable man who had so large a share in moulding John Wesley's career, Peter Bonier, and also of a Mr. Bray, a brazier in Little Britain. On Whitsunday, 1737, [sic. 1738] he "found rest to his soul," and in 1738 he became curate to his friend, Mr. Stonehouse, Vicar of Islington, but the opposition of the churchwardens was so great that the Vicar consented that he "should preach in his church no more." Henceforth his work was identified with that of his brother John, and he became an indefatigable itinerant and field preacher. On April 8, 1749, he married Miss Sarah Gwynne. His marriage, unlike that of his brother John, was a most happy one; his wife was accustomed to accompany him on his evangelistic journeys, which were as frequent as ever until the year 1756," when he ceased to itinerate, and mainly devoted himself to the care of the Societies in London and Bristol. Bristol was his headquarters until 1771, when he removed with his family to London, and, besides attending to the Societies, devoted himself much, as he had done in his youth, to the spiritual care of prisoners in Newgate. He had long been troubled about the relations of Methodism to the Church of England, and strongly disapproved of his brother John's "ordinations." Wesley-like, he expressed his disapproval in the most outspoken fashion, but, as in the case of Samuel at an earlier period, the differences between the brothers never led to a breach of friendship. He died in London, March 29, 1788, and was buried in Marylebone churchyard. His brother John was deeply grieved because he would not consent to be interred in the burial-ground of the City Road Chapel, where he had prepared a grave for himself, but Charles said, "I have lived, and I die, in the Communion of the Church of England, and I will be buried in the yard of my parish church." Eight clergymen of the Church of England bore his pall. He had a large family, four of whom survived him; three sons, who all became distinguished in the musical world, and one daughter, who inherited some of her father's poetical genius. The widow and orphans were treated with the greatest kindness and generosity by John Wesley. As a hymn-writer Charles Wesley was unique. He is said to have written no less than 6500 hymns, and though, of course, in so vast a number some are of unequal merit, it is perfectly marvellous how many there are which rise to the highest degree of excellence. His feelings on every occasion of importance, whether private or public, found their best expression in a hymn. His own conversion, his own marriage, the earthquake panic, the rumours of an invasion from France, the defeat of Prince Charles Edward at Culloden, the Gordon riots, every Festival of the Christian Church, every doctrine of the Christian Faith, striking scenes in Scripture history, striking scenes which came within his own view, the deaths of friends as they passed away, one by one, before him, all furnished occasions for the exercise of his divine gift. Nor must we forget his hymns for little children, a branch of sacred poetry in which the mantle of Dr. Watts seems to have fallen upon him. It would be simply impossible within our space to enumerate even those of the hymns which have become really classical. The saying that a really good hymn is as rare an appearance as that of a comet is falsified by the work of Charles Wesley; for hymns, which are really good in every respect, flowed from his pen in quick succession, and death alone stopped the course of the perennial stream. It has been the common practice, however for a hundred years or more to ascribe all translations from the German to John Wesley, as he only of the two brothers knew that language; and to assign to Charles Wesley all the original hymns except such as are traceable to John Wesley through his Journals and other works. The list of 482 original hymns by John and Charles Wesley listed in this Dictionary of Hymnology have formed an important part of Methodist hymnody and show the enormous influence of the Wesleys on the English hymnody of the nineteenth century. -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Charles Wesley, the son of Samuel Wesley, was born at Epworth, Dec. 18, 1707. He was educated at Westminster School and afterwards at Christ Church, Oxford, where he graduated M.A. In 1735, he took Orders and immediately proceeded with his brother John to Georgia, both being employed as missionaries of the S.P.G. He returned to England in 1736. For many years he engaged with his brother in preaching the Gospel. He died March 29, 1788. To Charles Wesley has been justly assigned the appellation of the "Bard of Methodism." His prominence in hymn writing may be judged from the fact that in the "Wesleyan Hymn Book," 623 of the 770 hymns were written by him; and he published more than thirty poetical works, written either by himself alone, or in conjunction with his brother. The number of his separate hymns is at least five thousand. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A., 1872.

Mary Peters

1813 - 1856 Person Name: Mary Bowley Peters Author of "Whom have we, Lord, but Thee" in Hymns of Worship and Remembrance Also known as Mary P. Bowly ======= Peters, Mary, née Bowly, daughter of Richard Bowly, of Cirencester, was born in 1813, and subsequently married to the Rev. John McWilliam Peters, sometime Rector of Quennington, Gloucestershire, and died at Clifton, July 29, 1856. Her prose work, The World’s History from the Creation to the Accession of Queen Victoria, was published in seven volumes. Several of her hymns were contributed to the Plymouth Brethren's Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs, London, D. Walther, 1842. These with others, 58 in all, were published by Nisbet & Co., London, 1847, as Hymns intended to help the Communion of Saints. Dr. Walker introduced several from these collections into his Cheltenham Psalms & Hymns, 1855. Many of these have been repeated in Snepp's Songs of Grace & Glory, 1872. and other Church of England hymnbooks. These include, besides those annotated under their respective first lines :— i. From Psalms, Hymns, & Sacred Songs, 1842:— 1. Blessed Lord, our hearts are panting. Buria. Given in later collections as "Blessed Lord, our souls are longing." 2. How can there be one holy thought! Holiness through Christ. 3. Jesus, how much Thy Name unfolds. The Name of Jesus. 4. Lord, we see the day approaching. Second Advent. 5. 0 Lord, we know it matters not. Taught by the Spirit. 6. The murmurs of the wilderness. Praise to Jesus. 7. The saints awhile dispersed abroad. God within us. 8. Unworthy is thanksgiving. Jesus the Mediator. 9. Whom have we, Lord, but Thee. Christ All in All. 10. With thankful hearts we meet, 0 Lord. Public Worship. From her Hymns, &c, 1847:— 11. Earth's firmest ties will perish. Burial. 12. Enquire, my soul, enquire. Second Advent. 13. Hallelujah, we are hastening. Journeying Heavenward. 14. Holy Father, we address Thee. Holy Trinity. 15. Jesus, of Thee we ne'er would tire. Holy Communion. 16. Lord Jesus, in Thy Name alone. Holy Communion. 17. Lord, through the desert drear and wide. Prayer for Perseverance. 18. Many sons to glory bring. Security in Christ. 19. 0 Lord, whilst we confess the worth. Dead in Christ. Sometimes it begins with st. ii., "Dead to the world we here avow." 20. Our God is light, we do not go. Christ the Guide. 21. Praise ye the Lord, again, again. Public Worship. 22. Salvation to our God. Passiontide. 23. The holiest we enter. Public Worship. Sometimes given as "The holiest now we enter." 24. Through the love of God our Saviour. Security in Christ. 25. Thy grace, 0 Lord, to us hath shown. Offertory. 26. We're pilgrims in the wilderness. Life a Pilgrimage. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

John J. Overholt

1918 - 2000 Recaster of "Saviour, Again We Raise" in The Christian Hymnary. Bks. 1-4 John J. Overholt was born to an Amish family of limited means in the state of Ohio in 1918. As a child he was soon introduced to his father's personal collection of gospel songs and hymns, which was to have a marked influence on his later life. With his twin brother Joe, he early was exposed to the Amish-Mennonite tradition hymn-singing and praising worship. An early career in Christian service led to a two-year period of relief work in the country of Poland following World War II. During that interim he began to gather many European songs and hymns as a personal hobby, not realizing that these selections would become invaluable to The Christian Hymnary which was begun in 1960 and completed twelve years later in 1972, with a compilation of 1000 songs, hymns and chorales. (The largest Menn. hymnal). A second hymnal was begun simultaneously in the German language entitled Erweckungs Lieder Nr.1 which was brought to completion in 1986. This hymnal has a total of 200 selections with a small addendum of English hymns. Mr. Overholt married in 1965 to an accomplished soprano Vera Marie Sommers, who was not to be outdone by her husband's creativity and compiled a hymnal of 156 selections entitled Be Glad and Sing, directed to children and youth and first printed in 1986. During this later career of hymn publishing, Mr. Overholt also found time for Gospel team work throughout Europe. At this writing he is preparing for a 5th consecutive tour which he arranges and guides. The countries visited will be Belgium, Switzerland, France, Germany, Poland, USSR and Romania. Mr. Overholt was called to the Christian ministry in 1957 and resides at Sarasota, Florida where he is co-minister of a Beachy Amish-Mennonite Church. Five children were born to this family and all enjoy worship in song. --Letter from Hannah Joanna Overholt to Mary Louise VanDyke, 10 October 1990, DNAH Archives. Photo enclosed.

E. Margaret Clarkson

1915 - 2008 Author of "Burn in Me, Fire of God" in Baptist Hymnal 1991

Edward Osler

1798 - 1863 Person Name: E. Osler, 1798-1863 Author of "Blest are the pure in heart" in The Hymnal Osler, Edward, was born at Falmouth in January, 1798, and was educated for the medical profession, first by Dr. Carvosso, at Falmouth, and then at Guy's Hospital, London. From 1819 to 1836 he was house surgeon at the Swansea Infirmary. He then removed to London, and devoted himself to literary pursuits. For some time he was associated with the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, both in London and at Bath. In 1841 he became the Editor of the Royal Cornwall Gazette, and took up his residence at Truro. He retained that appointment till his death, at Truro, March 7, 1863. For the Linnaean Society he wrote Burrowing and Boring Marine Animals. He also published Church and Bible; The Voyage: a Poem written at Sea, and in the West Indies, and Illustrated by papers on Natural History, 1830; The Life of Lord Exmouth, 1837, &c. His hymnological work is mainly connected with the Mitre Hymn Book. During 1835-36 he was associated with Prebendary W. J. Hall, the editor, in producing that collection, which was published in 1836 as Psalms and Hymns adapted to The Services of the Church of England. He resided in Mr. Hall's house during the time. From the "hall manuscript" we gather that he contributed 15 versions of the Psalms (5 being rewritten from others), and 50 hymns (a few rewritten). Most of these hymns and Psalm versions, together with others not in the Mitre Hymn Book, were afterwards given in the monthly numbers of his Church and King, from Nov. 1836 to Aug. 1837. The best known of these hymns are, “O God, unseen, yet ever near," and “Worship, honour, glory, blessing." Several of his hymns in common use are:— 1. Father, Whose love and truth fulfil. Holy Baptism. 2. Glory to God! with joyful adoration. Praise to the Father. 3. Great God, o'er earth and heaven supreme. Men the Stewards of God's Bounties. 4. Great God of hosts, our ears have heard. Ps. xliv. Based on the N. Version. 5. Great God, Whose awful mystery. Holy Trinity. 6. I hold the sacred book of God. Martyrs. 7. Jehovah hath spoken, the nations shall hear. Second Advent. 8. Lord, may the inward grace abound. Holy Baptism. 9. May we Thy precepts, Lord, fulfil. Love. 10. Mighty Saviour, gracious King. Advent. 11. 0 God, the help of all Thy Saints. Ps. x. 12. O Thou, the Lord and Life of those. Christ the Life of Men. 13. O Saviour, Who didst come. Easter. 14. Saviour, Whose love could stoop to death. Easter. 15. See, Lord, before Thy mercy seat. For Schools. 16. Set in a high and favoured place. Advent. 17. Wake frem the dead, new life begin. Lent. 18. With trembling awe we come. Lent. Several of these hymns are not in Osier's Church and King. We have ascribed them and others to him on the authority of the "hall MSS." It must be noted also that the text in the Church and King often differs from that in the Mitre. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) Though not mentioned by Julian, perhaps his most enduring contribution to hymnody is the third stanza of "Praise the Lord! Ye Heavens, Adore Him", whose first two stanzas are of anonymous authorship. --Leland Bryant Ross (2019)

Benjamin Beddome

1717 - 1795 Person Name: Benjamin Beddome, 1717-1795 Author of "Ye Mourning Saints Behold" in The Cyber Hymnal Benjamin Beddome was born at Henley-in Arden, Warwickshire, January 23, 1717. His father was a Baptist minister. He studied at various places, and began preaching in 1740. He was pastor of a Baptist society at Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, until his death in 1795. In 1770, he received the degree of M.A. from the Baptist College in Providence, Rhode Island. He published several discourses and hymns. "His hymns, to the number of 830, were published in 1818, with a recommendation from Robert Hall." Montgomery speaks of him as a "writer worthy of honour both for the quantity and the quality of his hymns." --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ========================= Beddome, Benjamin , M.A. This prolific hymnwriter was born at Henley-in-Arden, Warwickshire, Jan. 23, 1717, where his father, the Rev. John Beddome, was atthat time Baptist Minister. He was apprenticed to a surgeon in Bristol, but removing to London, he joined, in 1739, the Baptist church in Prescott St. At the call of this church he devoted himself to the work of the Christian ministry, and in 1740 began to preach at Bourton-on-the-Water, in Gloucestershire. Declining invitations to remove to London or elsewhere, he continued pastor at Bourton until his death, on Sep. 3, 1795, at the age of 78. Mr. Beddome was for many years one of the most respected Baptist ministers in the West of England. He was a man of some literary culture. In 1770 he received the degree of M.A. from Providence College, Rhode Island. He was the author of an Exposition of the Baptist Catechism, 1752, in great repute at the time, and reprinted by Dr. C. Evans in 1772. It was his practice to prepare a hymn every week to be sung after his Sunday morning sermon. Though not originally intended for publication, he allowed thirteen of these to appear in the Bristol Baptist Collection of Ash & Evans (1769), and thirty-six in Dr. Rippon's Baptist Selection (1787), whence a number of them found their way into the General Baptist Hymn Book of 1793 and other collections. In 1817, a posthumous collection of his hymns was published, containing 830 pieces, with an introduction by the Rev. Robert Hall, and entitled "Hymns adapted to Public Worship or Family Devotion, now first published from the Manuscripts of the late Rev. B. Beddome, M.A." Preface dated "Leicester, Nov. 10, 1817." Some of the early copies bear the same date on the title page. Copies bearing both the 1817 and 1818 dates are in the British Museum. The date usually given is 1818. Some hymns are also appended to his Sermons, seven volumes of which were published l805—1819; and over twenty are given in the Baptist Register of various dates. Beddome's hymns were commended by Montgomery as embodying one central idea, "always important, often striking, and sometimes ingeniously brought out." Robert Hall's opinion is just, when in his "Recommendatory Preface" to the Hymns, &c, he says, p. vii.:— "The man of taste will be gratified with the beauty and original turns of thought which many of them ex¬hibit, while the experimental Christian will often perceive the most secret movements of his soul strikingly delineated, and sentiments pourtrayed which will find their echo in every heart." With the exception of a few composed for Baptisms and other special occasions, their present use in Great Britain is limited, but in America somewhat extensive. One of the best is the Ordination Hymn, "Father of Mercies, bow Thine ear." Another favourite is “ My times of sorrow and of joy," composed, by a singular coincidence, to be sung on Sunday, Jan. 14, 1778, the day on which his son died, most unexpectedly, in Edinburgh. "Let party names no more," is very popular both in Great Brit, and America. "Faith, His a precious gift," "Witness, ye men and angels, now," and the hymn for Holy Baptism, "Buried beneath the yielding wave," are also found in many collections. Beddome's popularity is, however, now mainly in America. [Rev. W. R. Stevenson, M.A.] Beddome is thus seen to be in common use to the extent of about 100 hymns. In this respect he exceeds every other Baptist hymnwriter; Miss Steele ranking second. The authorities for Beddome's hymns are: (1) A Collection of Hymns adapted to Public Worship, Bristol, W. Pine, 1769, the Collection of Ash & Evans; (2) Dr. Rippon's Selections 1787, and later editions; (3) Sermons printed from the Manuscripts of the late Rev. Benjamin Beddome, M.A.,... with brief Memoir of the Author, Dunstable & Lond., 1805-1819; (4) Dr. Rippon's Baptist Register, 1795, &c.; (5) The Beddome Manuscripts, in the Baptist College, Bristol; (6) and Hymns adapted to Public Worship, or Family Devotion now first published, from Manuscripts of the late Rev. B. Beddome, A.M. With a Recommendatory Preface by the Rev. R. Hall, A.M. Lond., 1817. In his Preface, Mr. Hall gives this account of the Beddome Manuscript:— "The present Editor was entrusted several years ago with the MSS, both in prose and verse, with permission from the late Messrs. S. & B. Beddome, sons of the Author, to publish such parts of them as he might deem proper. He is also indebted to a descendant of the Rev. W. Christian, formerly pastor of the Baptist Church at Sheepshead, Leicestershire, for some of the Author's valuable hymns, which had been carefully preserved in the family. From both these sources, as well as others of less consequence, the present interesting volume has been derived." -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ======================= Beddome, Benjamin, pp. 121-124. Other hymns in common use:— 1. Great God, before Thy mercy-seat. (1817). Lent. 2. Great God, oppressed with grief and fear. (1787.) Reading H. Scripture. 3. How glorious is Thy word, 0 God. Holy Scripture. From "When Israel, &c," p. 124, i. 4. In God I ever will rejoice. Morning. From his Hymns, &c, 1817. 5. Jesus, my Lord, divinely fair. (1817.) Jesus the King of Saints. Begins with stanza ii. of “Listen, ye mortals, while I sing." 6. Rejoice, for Christ the Saviour reigns. Missions. Altered form of "Shout, for the blessed, &c," p. 123, ii. 7. Satan, the world, and sin. (1817.) In Temptation. 8. Thou, Lord of all above. (1817.) Lent. 9. Unto Thine altar, Lord. (1787.) Lent. 10. Ye saints of every rank, with joy. (1800.) Public Worship. The dates given above are, 1787 and 1800, Rippon's Selection; and 1817 Beddome's Hymns. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II

Louis F. Benson

1855 - 1930 Person Name: Rev. Louis F. Benson Author of "I name Thy hallowed Name" in Junior Church School Hymnal Benson, Louis FitzGerald, D.D., was born at Philadelphia, Penn., July 22, 1855, and educated at the University of Penn. He was admitted to the Bar in 1877, and practised until 1884. After a course of theological studies he was ordained by the Presbytery of Philadelphia North, in 1888. His pastorate of the Church of the Redeemer, Germantown, Phila., extended from his ordination in 1888 to 1894, when he resigned and devoted himself to literary and Church work at Philadelphia. He edited the series of Hymnals authorised for use by the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., as follows:— (1) The Hymnal, Phila., 1895; (2) The Chapel Hymnal, 1898; and (3) The School Hymnal, 1899. Dr. Benson's hymnological writings are somewhat extensive. They include:— (1) Hymns and Verses (original and translations), 1897; (2) The Best Church Hymns, 1898; (3) The Best Hymns, 1898; (4) Studies of Familiar Hymns, 1903, &c. Of his original hymns the following have come into American common use:— I. In The Hymnal, 1895:— 1. O Christ, Who didst our tasks fulfil. For Schools and Colleges. Written in 1894. 2. O risen Christ, Who from Thy throne. For Installation of a Pastor. Written in 1894. II. In The School Hymnal, 1899:— 3. A glory lit the wintry sky. Loneliness of Jesus. Written in 1897. 4. Happy town of Salem. Heaven. 5. Now the wintry days are o'er. Easter. 6. O sing a song of Bethlehem. Early Life of Jesus. 7. Open the door to the Saviour. Invitation. 8. Out of the skies, like angel eyes. Lullaby. 9. Who will teach me how to pray? Prayer. In Carey Bonner's Sunday School Hymnary, 1905:— 10. The sun is on the land and sea. Morning. 11. Our wilful hearts have gone astray. Penitence. 12. When I awake from slumber. Morning. Of the above, Nos. 1-4, 10-12 are from Hymns and Verses, 1897. In the above collection by C. Bonner, Nos. 1, 4, and 6 are also found. Of Dr. Benson's translations from the Latin one only is in common use. See "Plaudite coeli, Rideat aether." As a hymn writer Dr. Benson is not widely known, mainly through the recent publication of his verse. His hymns deserve attention, and will, no doubt, gain the public ear in due time; whilst his hymnological researches and publications are thorough and praiseworthy. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

A. Williams

1731 - 1776 Person Name: Aaron Williams, 1731-1776 Composer of "DURHAM" in A Teaching Hymnal Aaron Williams (b. London, England, 1731; d. London, 1776) was a singing teacher, music engraver, and clerk at the Scottish Church, London Wall. He published various church music collections, some intended for rural church choirs. Representative of his compilations are The Universal Psalmodist (1763)— published in the United States as The American Harmony (1769)—The Royal Harmony (1766), The New Universal Psalmodist (1770), and Psalmody in Miniature (1778). His Harmonia Coelestis (1775) included anthems by noted composers. Bert Polman

Elizabeth Rundle Charles

1828 - 1896 Person Name: Elizabeth R. Charles, 1828 - 1896 Author of "Come and rejoice with me!" in The Hymnary for use in Baptist churches Charles, Elizabeth, née Rundle, is the author of numerous and very popular works intended to popularize the history of early Christian life in Great Britain; of Luther and his times; of Wesley and his work; the struggles of English civil wars; and kindred subjects as embodied in the Chronicles of the Schönherg-Cotta Family, the Diary of Kitty Trevelyan, &c, was born at Tavistock, Devonshire, Her father was John Rundle, M.P., and her husband, Andrew Paton Charles, Barrister-at-Law. Mrs. Charles has made some valuable contributions to hymnology, including original hymns and translations from the Latin and German. These were given in her:— (1) The Voice of Christian Life in Song; or, Hymns and Hymn-writers of Many Lands and Ages, 1858; (2) The Three Wakings, and other Poems, 1859; and (3) The Chronicles of the Schönberg-Cotta Family; (4) Poems, New York, 1867. This has some additional pieces. Her hymn on the Annunciation, "Age after age shall call thee [her] blessed," appeared in her Three Wakings, &c., 1859. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ========================= Charles, Elizabeth, née Rundle. Mrs. Charles has assumed the name of "Rundle-Charles," as given in the 1890 edition of the Hymnal Companion. Other hymns in common use are:— 1. Around a Table, not a tomb. Holy Communion. Dated Oct. 1862. In her Poems, 1868, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. 2. Come, and rejoice with me. Joy in Christ. Some-times dated 1846. From her Three Wakings, 1859, p. 146, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines, and headed "Eureka." 3. Jesus, what once Thou wast. Jesus the Unchangeable One. In Mrs. Brock's Children's Hymn Book, 1881. 4. Never further than Thy Cross. Passiontide. In The Family Treasury, Feb. 1860. 5. What marks the dawning of the Year? New Year. From her Three Wakings, 1859, p. 155. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907) ====================== Charles, Elizabeth, née Rundle, pp. 218, ii.; 1556, i. Mrs. Rundle-Charles was born Jan. 2, 1828, married in 1851, and died March 28, 1896. Her hymn, "The little birds fill all the air with their glee" (Thankfulness), was published in her Three Waitings, 1859, p. 165, as a "Song for an Infant School." It is found in The Sunday School Hymnary, 1905, and others. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

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