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Text Identifier:"^christ_whose_glory_fills_the_skies$"
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Geo. D. Elderkin

1845 - 1928 Person Name: George D. Elderkin Author (additional text and refrain) of "See Whose Glory Fills the Skies" in Voices Together Almost nothing is known about George D. Elderkin (b. 1845; d. 1928). There was a George D. Elderkin Publishing Company in Chicago which published four collections of gospel hymns entitled The Finest of the Wheat. Book Three (1904) includes 259 songs, including music by both George D. and George W. Elderkin, “for prayer and evangelistic meetings, church and missionary services, Sunday schools and young people’s societies,” and was edited by Geo. D. Elderkin, C. C. McCabe, Wm. J. Kirkpatrick, H. L. Gilmour, G. W. Elderikn, and F. A. Hardon.” It was hardbound, and sold for 30 cents per copy, postpaid. Emily Brink

Claude Goudimel

1514 - 1572 Arranger of "PSALM 135 (MINISTRES DE L'ÉTERNEL)" in Church Hymnary (4th ed.) The music of Claude Goudimel (b. Besançon, France, c. 1505; d. Lyons, France, 1572) was first published in Paris, and by 1551 he was composing harmonizations for some Genevan psalm tunes-initially for use by both Roman Catholics and Protestants. He became a Calvinist in 1557 while living in the Huguenot community in Metz. When the complete Genevan Psalter with its unison melodies was published in 1562, Goudimel began to compose various polyphonic settings of all the Genevan tunes. He actually composed three complete harmonizations of the Genevan Psalter, usually with the tune in the tenor part: simple hymn-style settings (1564), slightly more complicated harmonizations (1565), and quite elaborate, motet-like settings (1565-1566). The various Goudimel settings became popular throughout Calvinist Europe, both for domestic singing and later for use as organ harmonizations in church. Goudimel was one of the victims of the St. Bartholomew's Day massacre of Huguenots, which oc­curred throughout France. Bert Polman

Charles F. Gounod

1818 - 1893 Composer of "LUX PRIMA" in Psalter Hymnal (Gray) Charles F. Gounod (b. Paris, France, 1818; d. St. Cloud, France, 1893) was taught initially by his pianist mother. Later he studied at the Paris Conservatory, won the "Grand Prix de Rome" in 1839, and continued his musical training in Vienna, Berlin, and Leipzig. Though probably most famous for his opera Faust (1859) and other instrumental music (including his Meditation sur le Prelude de Bach, to which someone added the Ave Maria text for soprano solo), Gounod also composed church music-four Masses, three Requiems, and a Magnificat. His smaller works for church use were published as Chants Sacres. When he lived in England (1870-1875), Gounod became familiar with British cathedral music and served as conductor of what later became the Royal Choral Society. Bert Polman

Ludvig Mathias Lindeman

1812 - 1887 Person Name: Ludv. M. Lindeman, 1812—87 Composer of "[Christ, whose glory fills the skies]" in The Lutheran Hymnary Ludvig M. Lindeman (b. 1812; d. 1887) was a Norwegian composer and organist. Born in Trondheim, he studied theology in Oslo where he remained the rest of his life. In 1839 he succeeded his brother as the organist and cantor of Oslo Cathedral, a position he held for 48 years up until his death. Lindeman was appointed Knight of the Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav, and was invited to both help christen the new organ in Royal Albert Hall in London, as well as compose for the coronation of King Oscar II and Queen Sophie of Sweden. In 1883, he and his son started the Organist School in Oslo. Lindeman is perhaps best known for his arrangements of Norwegiam folk tales; over the course of his life he collected over 3000 folk melodies and tunes. Laura de Jong

Benjamin Carr

1768 - 1831 Arranger of "SPANISH HYMN" in Christian Praise

Elizabeth Poston

1905 - 1987 Person Name: E. P. Harmony revised and descant by of "RATISBON" in The Cambridge Hymnal Elizabeth Poston (24 October 1905 – 18 March 1987) was an English composer, pianist, and writer. See more in: Wikipedia

Johann Christoph Bach

1642 - 1703 Person Name: Joh. Chr. Bach, 1643-1703 Composer of "[Christ, Whose glory fills the skies]" in Hymns and Chorales

Johannn Gottlob Werner

1777 - 1822 Person Name: Johann G. Werner, 1777-1822 Composer (attributed to) of "RATISBON" in Lutheran Service Book b. Oct. 4, 1777, Hayn be Borna, Sachsen, d. July 19, 1822, Chemnitz; German organist, teacher and composer

Johann Rosenmüller

1619 - 1684 Person Name: Johann Rosenmüller (-1686) Composer of "NASSAU" in The Evangelical Hymnal with Tunes Johann Rosenmueller, b. about 1615, Kursachsen; d. 1686, Wolfenbuettel Evangelical Lutheran Hymnal, 1908

Johann Schop

1590 - 1667 Person Name: John Schop (d. 1664) Composer of "DEMMIN" in The Oxford Hymn Book Johann Schop Germany 1590-1667. Born at lower Saxony, Germany, he became a Lutheran composer and violinist, much admired for his virtuoso and technical ability. In 1614 Duke Friedrich Ulrich made him a probationary musician in the Hofkapelle at Wolfenbuttel. He performed playing various instruments, but excelled as a violinist. He was engaged permanently in 1615, but the same year he responded to a summons to join the flourishing musical establishment of King Christian IV of Denmark in Copenhagen. There he met English viol player, William Brade, who had earlier been in service to Hamburg, Germany (and may have taught Schop there). Schops compositions for the violin set impressive demands for that area at that time. He also played other instruments, including the violi, lute, cornet, trombon, trumpet, zinke, and violin (virtuoso). In 1619 Schop and Brade left Copenhagen to escape the plague. He then went to Iburg, where he worked at the courtof the Osnabruck bishop, Philipp Sigismund. Schop had such a reputation that he soon acquired a post as Kapellmeister at an establishment in Hamburg and was the first member of the council music. In 1621 he was its director and the leading municipal violinist in that city, which offered him a substantial income for his participation in the church music program. He also was organist at the Jacobikirche. In 1634 he again traveled to Copenhagen with Heinrich Schutz and Heinrich Albert for the wedding of Crown Prince Christian. He won a violin contest there. Few German violinists were of his caliber musically. He returned to Hamburg, and the Danish king tried several times to woo him back to Denmark, but he stayed in Hamburg, becoming a director of music. He published books of violin music in 4 to 6 parts. He wrote two books of well-loved dance pieces and sacred concertos. He co-founded a school of song writing there in Hamburg with Thomas Selle. Many of his tunes were writtten for fellow townsmen and friend Johann Rist. Some of his music was performed at the Peace of Westphalia celebrations. Some of his tunes were used by chants in a cantata. Schop was married (wife’s name not found) and they had two sons, Johann II, and Albert, who also became musicians. He died in Hamburg. John Perry

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