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Christina Georgina Rossetti

1830 - 1894 Person Name: Christina Georgina Rossetti, 1830-1894 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "O Ye Who Taste That Love Is Sweet" in Singing the Living Tradition Rossetti, Christina Georgina, daughter of Gabriel, and sister of Dante Gabriel and William Michael Rossetti, was born in London, Dec. 5, 1830, and received her education at home. Her published works include:— (1) Goblin Market, and Other Poems, 1862; (2) The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems, 1866 ; (3) Poems, mainly a reprint of Nos. 1 and 2, 1875; (4) A Pageant, and Other Poems, 1881, &c. In addition, Miss Rossetti has published several prose works, as:— Annus Domini (a book of prayers for every day in the year), 1874; Letter and Spirit of the Decalogue, 1883, and others. She has written very few hymns avowedly for church worship, but several centos have been compiled from her poems, and have passed into several hymn-books. These include:— 1. Dead is thy daughter, trouble not the Master. The raising of Jairus's daughter. From her Goblin Market, &c, 1862, into Lyra Mystica, 1865. 2. God the Father, give us grace. Invocation of the Holy Trinity. From Lyra Mystica into the Savoy Hymnary, for use in the Chapel Koyai, Savoy (see No. 8 below). 3. I bore with thee long weary days and nights. The Love of Christ. From her Goblin Market, &c, 1862, into Lyra Messianica, 1864. 4. I would have gone, God bade me stay. Resignation. From her Poems, Hymns, 1884, &c. 1875, into Horder's Congregational Hymns. 5. Once I thought to sit so high. A Body hast Thou prepared Me, or Passiontide. Contributed to Lyra Eucharistica, 1863. 6. The Advent moon shines cold and clear. Advent. From her Goblin Market, &c, 1862. 7 The flowers that bloom in sun and shade. The Eternity of God. In Mrs. C. Brock's Children's Hymn Book, 1881. 8. What are these that glow from afar? Martyrs. Part of the poem "We meet in joy though we part in sorrow," which appeared in Lyra Mystica, 1865, and then in Miss Rossetti's Prince's Progress, &c, 1866. It is the most widely used of her hymns. No. 2 above is also from the same poem. Miss Rossetti's verses are profoundly suggestive and lyrical, and deserve a larger place than they occupy in the hymnody of the church. Her sonnets are amongst the finest in the English language. [Rev.W. Garrett Horder] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ============== Rossetti, Christina G., p. 978, i. The following hymns by Miss Rossetti have recently come into common use:— 1. A burdened heart that bleeds and bears. [Lent.] In her Time Flies: A Reading Diary, ed. 1897, p. 59, for March 26; and her Verses, &c., ed. 1898, p. 113. Included in Church Hymns, 1903. 2. Give me the lowest place, not that I dare. [Humility.] From her Prince's Progress, 1866, p. 216. 3. In the bleak midwinter. [Christmas.] In her Poetical Works, 1904, p. 246, as "Before 1872"; repeated in The English Hymnal, 1906. 4. None other Lamb, none other Name. [Jesus, All, and in All] From her The Face of the Deep, &c, 1892 (3rd ed. 1895, p. 176); and her Verses, &c, 1898, p. 36. It is the second of two poetical meditations on Rev. v. 6. In Church Hymns, 1903. 5. The shepherds had an angel. [Christmas.] In her Poetical Works, 1904, p. 187, this is entitled "A Christmas Carol. For my Godchildren," and dated 6 October, 1856. Repeated in the Sunday School Hymnary, 1905. 6. We know not a voice of that River. [The River of the Eternal City.] In The Face of the Deep, &c, 1892 (3rd ed. 1895, p. 523), as a poetical meditation on Rev, xxii. Also in her Verses, &c., 1898, p. 81. Additional works by Miss Rossetti to those named on p. 978, i., include Time Flies A Reading Diary, 1885; Called to be Saints, 1881; Seek and Find, 1879; The Face of the Deep, A Devotional Commentary on the Apocalypse, 1892; and Verses ... reprinted fromCalled to be Saints, Time Flies, The Face of the Deep, 1893. It must be noted that (1) the hymn attributed to her, "Dead is thy daughter; trouble not the Master," is not by her, but by Mrs. C. F. Alexander, with whose name it appeared in Lyra Mystica, 1865; and (2) her “I would be gone; God bade me stay," is from her Prince's Progress, 1866, p. 204. Miss Rossetti d. Dec. 29, 1891. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Michael Weisse

1480 - 1534 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "All Praise to God in Highest Heaven" in The Worshipbook Michael Weiss was born at Neisse, in Silesia. He was a pastor among the Bohemian Brethren, and a contemporary with Luther. His hymns have received commendation. He died in 1540. --Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872. ============ Weisse, Michael (Weiss, Wiss, Wegs, Weys, Weyss), was born circa 1480, in Neisse, Silesia, took priest's orders, and was for some time a monk at Breslau. When the early writings of Luther came into his hands, Weisse, with two other monks, abandoned the convent, and sought refuge in the Bohemian Brethren's House at Leutomischl in Bohemia. He became German preacher (and apparently founder of the German communities) to the Bohemian Brethren at Landskron in Bohemia, and Fulnck in Moravia, and died at Landskron in 1534 (Koch, ii. 115-120; Wackernagel's D. Kirchenlied, i. p. 727; Fontes rerum Austricarum, Scriptores, vol. ii. pt. ii. p. 227, Vienna, 18G3, &c). Weisse was admitted as a priest among the Brethren at the Synod of Brandeis, in 1531, and in 1532 was appointed a member of their Select Council, but he had previously performed important missions for the Brethren. He was, e.g., sent by Bishop Lucas, in 1522, along with J. Roh or Horn, to explain the views of the Bohemian Brethren to Luther; and again, in 1524, when they were appointed more especially to report on the practices and holiness of life of the followers of the German Reformers. He was also entrusted with the editing of the first German hymn-book of the Bohemian Brethren, which appeared as Ein New Gesengbuchlen at Jungen Bunzel (Jung Bunzlau) in Bohemia in 1531. This contained 155 hymns, all apparently either translations or else originals by himself. The proportion of translations is not very clear. In the preface to the 1531, Weisse addressing the German Communities at Fulnek and Landskron says, "I have also, according to my power, put forth all my ability, your old hymn-book as well as the Bohemian hymn-book (Cantional) being before me, and have brought the same sense, in accordance with Holy Scripture, into German rhyme." Luther called Weisse "a good poet, with somewhat erroneous views on the Sacrament" (i.e. Holy Communion); and, after the Sacramental hymns had been revised by Roh (1544), included 12 of his hymns in V. Babst's Gesang-Buch, 1545. Many of his hymns possess considerable merit. The style is flowing and musical, the religious tone is earnest and manly, but yet tender and truly devout, and the best of them are distinguished by a certain charming simplicity of thought and expression. At least 119 passed into the German Lutheran hymnbooks of the 16th and 17th centuries, and many are still in use. The following hymns by Weisse have also passed into English:— i. Christus ist erstanden. Von des Todes Banden. Easter. First published 1531 as above, and thence in Wackernagel, iii. p. 273, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. It is suggested by the older hymn, "Christ ist erstanden". In the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 129. The translation in common use is:— Christ the Lord is risen again! This is a full and very good translation by Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858, p. 37, and her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 58. It has been included in many recent English and American hymnals. Other translations are:— (1) "Christ (and 'tis no wonder"). This is No. 260 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. (2) "Christ our Lord is risen," by Dr. H. Mills, 1856, p. 322. ii. Es geht daher des Tages Schein. Morning. 1531 as above, and thence in Wackernagel, iii. p. 318, in 7 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 455. The translations in common use are:— 1. The Light of Day again we see. In full, by H. J. Buckoll in his Hymns from German, 1842, p. 14. His translations of stanzas iii., iv., vi., vii., beginning “Great God, eternal Lord of Heaven," were included in the Rugby School Hymn Book, 1843. 2. Once more the daylight shines abroad. This is a full and very good translation by Miss Winkworth, in her Lyra Germanica, 2nd Ser., 1858, p. 69, and her Chorale Book for England, 1863, No. 18. Repeated in Thring's Collection, 1880-82. iii. Gelobt sei Gott im höchsten Thron. Easter. 1531 as above, and thence in Wackernagel, iii. p. 265, in 20 stanzas of 3 lines, with Alleluia. The translations in common use are: — 1. Praise God upon His heavenly throne. This is a free translation of stanzas 1, 4, 10, 19, 20, by A. T. Russell, as No. 112, in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. 2. Glory to God upon His throne. By Mrs. H. R. Spaeth, in the Southern Lutheran Service and Hymns for Sunday Schools , Philadelphia, 1883. iv. Gott sah zu seiner Zeit. Christmas. 1531 as above, and thence in Wackernagel, iii. p. 244, in 10 stanzas of 9 lines. The translation in common use is:— When the due Time had taken place. By C. Kinchen, omitting stanza v., as No. 169 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1742 (1849, No. 20). In the ed. of 1886, No. 954 consists of stanza x., beginning “Ah come, Lord Jesus, hear our prayer." v. Lob sei dem allmächtigen Gott. Advent. 1531 as above, and thence in Wackernagel, iii. p. 230, in 14 stanzas of 4 lines. Included in V. Babst's Gesang-Buch, 1545, and recently as No. 12 in the Unverfälschter Liedersegen , 1851. In the larger edition of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1886, it is marked as a translation from a Bohemian hymn, beginning "Cirkev Kristova Boha chval." The translations are:— 1. Praise be to that Almighty God. By J. Gambold, omitting stanza xi.-xiii., as No, 246, in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. In the 1789 and later eds. (1886, No. 31), it begins “To God we render thanks and praise." 2. O come, th' Almighty's praise declare. By A. T. Russell, of stanzas i.-iii., v., as No. 26 in his Psalms & Hymns, 1851. vi. O Herre Jesu Christ, der du erschienen bistanza. For Children. On Christ's Example in His early years on earth . 1531 as above, and in Wackernagel, iii. p. 326, in 7 stanzas of 7 lines. The first three stanzas are translated as “Christ Jesus, Lord most dear," in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754, pt. i., No. 278. The form in common use is that in Knapp's Evangelischer Lieder-Schatz , 1837, No. 2951, which begins "Nun hilf uns, o Herr Jesu Christ," and is in 3 stanzas of 4 lines, entirely recast. This is translated as:— Lord Jesus Christ, we come to Thee . In full from Knapp, by Miss Winkworth, in her Chorale Book for England , 1863, No. 179. Hymns not in English common use:— vii. Den Vater dort oben. Grace after Meat. 1531, and thence in Wackernagel, iii., p. 321, in 5 stanzas of 7 lines. In the Berlin Geistliche Lieder, ed. 1863, No. 1136. Translated as, "Father, Lord of mercy," by J. V. Jacobi, 1122, p. 117. In his edition, 1732, p. 183, slightly altered, and thence in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754, pt. i., No. 290. viii. Die Sonne wird mit ihrem Schein. Evening. 1531, and thence in Wackernagel, iii., p. 323, in 6 stanzas of 4 lines. In the Unverfälschter Liedersegen, 1851, No. 517. Translated as, "Soon from our wishful eyes awhile," by H. J. Buckoll, 1842. ix. Komm, heiliger Geist, wahrer Gott. Whitsuntide . 1531, and in Wackernagel , iii., p. 282, in 9 stanzas of 5 lines From the Bohemian as noted at p. 157, and partly suggested by the "Veni Sancte Spiritus reple " (q.v.). The translations are: (1) “Come, Holy Ghost, Lord God indeed." This is No. 285 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. (2) "Thou great Teacher, Who instructest." This is a translation of stanza vii., as No. 234 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1801 (1849, No. 267). x. Lob und Ehr mit stettem Dankopfer. The Creation: Septuagesima . 1531, and in Wackernagel, iii., p. 287, in 5 stanzas of 16 lines. Translated as, “Praise, glory, thanks, be ever paid," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 137. xi. 0 Jesu Christ, der Heiden Licht. Epiphany. 1531, and in Wackernagel , iii. p. 248, in 2 stanzas of 14 lines. Translated as, "0 Jesus Christ, the Gentiles' Light." This is No. 253 in pt. i. of the Moravian Hymn Book, 1754. In the Brüder Gesang-Buch, 1778, No. 1467, stanza ii. was rewritten. This form begins, "Erscheine alien Auserwahlten," and is in 4 stanzas of 4 lines. Translated as, "Lord, to Thy chosen ones appear," by Miss Winkworth, 1869, p. 139. xii. Singet lieben Leut. Redemption by Christ. 1531, and in Wackernagel, iii. p. 243, in 16 stanzas of 4 lines. Translated as, "Sing, be glad, ye happy sheep." This is a translation of stanza xiv., by C. G. Clemens, as No. 299 in the Moravian Hymn Book, 1789. In the 1801 and later editions (1849, No. 403) it begins, "O rejoice, Christ's happy sheep." [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.] -- Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Ruth C. Duck

b. 1947 Person Name: Ruth Duck Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Translator of "O Sons and Daughters, Sing Your Praise" in Chalice Hymnal

Gregory Murray

1905 - 1992 Person Name: Gregory Murray, 1906-1992 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Composer of "SURREXIT" in Complete Anglican Hymns Old and New

John L. Bell

b. 1949 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "Jesus is risen from the grave" John Bell (b. 1949) was born in the Scottish town of Kilmarnock in Ayrshire, intending to be a music teacher when he felt the call to the ministry. But in frustration with his classes, he did volunteer work in a deprived neighborhood in London for a time and also served for two years as an associate pastor at the English Reformed Church in Amsterdam. After graduating he worked for five years as a youth pastor for the Church of Scotland, serving a large region that included about 500 churches. He then took a similar position with the Iona Community, and with his colleague Graham Maule, began to broaden the youth ministry to focus on renewal of the church’s worship. His approach soon turned to composing songs within the identifiable traditions of hymnody that began to address concerns missing from the current Scottish hymnal: "I discovered that seldom did our hymns represent the plight of poor people to God. There was nothing that dealt with unemployment, nothing that dealt with living in a multicultural society and feeling disenfranchised. There was nothing about child abuse…,that reflected concern for the developing world, nothing that helped see ourselves as brothers and sisters to those who are suffering from poverty or persecution." [from an interview in Reformed Worship (March 1993)] That concern not only led to writing many songs, but increasingly to introducing them internationally in many conferences, while also gathering songs from around the world. He was convener for the fourth edition of the Church of Scotland’s Church Hymnary (2005), a very different collection from the previous 1973 edition. His books, The Singing Thing and The Singing Thing Too, as well as the many collections of songs and worship resources produced by John Bell—some together with other members of the Iona Community’s “Wild Goose Resource Group,” —are available in North America from GIA Publications. Emily Brink

Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina

1525 - 1594 Person Name: Giovanni P. da Palestrina Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Composer of "PALESTRINA" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Giovanni Pierluigi (da Palestrina) Italy 1525-1594. Born at Palestrina, Italy, near Rome, then part of the Papal States to Neopolitan parents. As a youth he became a chorister at the Santa Maria Maggiore basilica in the Rome Diocese. This allowed him to learn literature and music. In 1540 he moved to Rome, where he studied in the school ofr the Hugenot, Claude Goudimel. He also studied with Robin Mallapert and Firmin Lebel. Orlando Di Lasso was also a musical advisor to him. From 1544-1551 he was organist at the Cathedral of St Agapito, the principle church of his native city. In 1547 he married Lucrezia Gori, and they had four children: Rodolfo, Angelo, Iginio, and a daughter. In 1551 Pope Julius III (previously Bishop of Palestrina) appointed him ‘maestro di cappella’, or musical director of the Cappella Giulia (choir). Pierluigi dedicated his first published compositions to Pope Julius III (1554), known as ‘the book of Masses’. It was the first book of masses by a native composer, since most sacred works in those days were from low countries (France or Spain). In 1555 Pope Paul IV ordered that all papal choristers should be clerical. As Pierluigi married early in life and had four children, he was unable to continue in the chapel as a layman. During the next decade he held positions similar to his Julian Chapel appointment at other chapels and churches in Rome, including St John Lateran (1555-1560), and Santa Maria Maggiore (1561-1566). In 1571 he returned to the Julian Chapel and remained at St Peter’s for the rest of his life. The 1570s was a decade of difficulty for him, as he lost his brother, two sons, and his wife in three separate outbreaks of plague (1572-1575-1580). In 1578 he was given the title of ‘Master of Music’ at the Vatican Basilica. He thought of becoming a priest at this time, but instead married a wealthy widow, Virginia Formoli, in 1581, widow of a wealthy merchant, which gave him financial independence (he was not well-paid as choirmaster). He spent considerable time administering to her fortune, but also was able to compose prolifically until his death. He also helped to found an association of professional musicians called the Vertuosa Compagnia dei Musici. He died in Rome of pleurisy. He left hundreds of compositions, including 1045 masses, 68 offertories, 140 madrigals, 300+ motets, 72 hymns, 35 magnificats, 11 litanies and several sets of lamentations. There are two comprehensive editions of his works: a 33-volume edition published by Breitkopf and Hartel, in Leigzig, Germany, between 1862-1894, edited by Franz Xaver Habert, and a 34-volume edition published in the mid 20th century by Fratelli Scalera, in Rome, Italy, edited by R Casimiri and others. As a Renaissance musician and composer of sacred music he was the best known 16th century representative of the Roman School of musical composition. He had a long-lasting influence on the development of church and secular music in Europe, especially on the development of counterpoint, his work considered the culmination of Renaissance polyphony. Very famous in his day, he was considered by some the legendary ‘savior of church music’. A 2009 film was produced by German television about him, titled: ‘Palestrina – Prince of Music’. John Perry

Cyril Alington

1872 - 1955 Person Name: Cyril A. Alington Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "Good Christian Men, Rejoice and Sing!" in Trinity Hymnal (Rev. ed.) Educated at Trinity College, Oxford, England, Cyril A. Alington (b. Ipswich, England, 1872; d. St. Leonards, Hertfordshire, England, 1955) was ordained a priest in the Church of England in 1901. He had a teaching career that included being headmaster at Shrewsbury School and Eton College. He was dean of Durham from 1933-1951 as well as chaplain to the king of England. His writings include literary works and Christianity in England, Good News (1945). Many of his hymns appeared in various twentieth-century editions of the famous British hymnal, Hymns Ancient and Modern. Bert Polman

Henry G. Ley

1887 - 1962 Person Name: Henry George Ley (1887-1962) Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Harmonizer of "VULPIUS (GELOBT SEI GOTT)" in Church Hymnary (4th ed.) Born: December 30, 1887, Chagford, Devonshire, England. Died: August 24, 1962, near Ottery, Devonshire, England. Ley trained as a chorister at St. George’s Chapel, Windsor, as a music scholar at Uppingham, the Royal College of Music, and as an organ scholar at Keble College, Oxford. He was Precentor of Radley College; organist at Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford (1909-26); Choragus of the University, Oxford; professor of the organ at the Royal College of Music (1919); and organist at Eton College. Sources: Frost, p. 680 West, p. 87 http://www.hymntime.com/tch/bio/l/e/y/ley_hg.htm

Frederick Lucian Hosmer

1840 - 1929 Person Name: Frederick Lucian Hosmer, 1840 - 1929 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "O Lord of life, where'er they be" in The Hymnary of the United Church of Canada Hosmer, Frederick Lucian, B.A., was born at Framingham, Mass., in 1840, and educated at Harvard, where he graduated B.A. in 1869. Entering the Unitarian Ministry in 1872 he has held charges in Quincy, Ill., 1872-77; Cleveland, Ohio, 1878-92; St. Louis, 1894-99; and since 1899, at Berkeley, Cal. His Way of Life, 1877, was a compilation of Prayers and Responsive Services for Sunday Schools. Of Unity Hymns and Carols, 1880, he was joint editor with W. C. Gannett and J. V. Blake. His hymns were published jointly by him and W. C. Gannett (q.v.), as The Thought of God in Hymns and Poems (Boston: Little, Brown & Co.), 1st Series, 1885; 2nd Series, 1894. Of his 56 hymns in this work the following have come into common use, for the most part during the past ten years:— 1. Father, to Thee we look in all our sorrow. [Trust in God.] Written in 1881 upon the death of a member of the author's congregation, and published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 2. From age to age how grandly rise. [Unity.] Written for the annual festival of the Free Religious Assoc, Boston, June 2, 1899, and first published in Souvenir Festival Hymns, 1899. Subsequently altered by the author to "From age to age the prophet's vision." 3. From age to age they gather, all the brave of heart and strong. [Victory of Truth.] "Written in 1891 for the Dedication of Unity Church, Decorah, Iowa, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 4. From many ways and wide apart. [College or School Reunion.] Dated in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, as having been written in 1890. 5. Go not, my soul, in search of Him. [God Within.] Written in 1879, printed in the Boston Christian Register, May 31, 1879, and included in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title, "The Indwelling God." 6. I cannot think of them as dead. [Eternal Life.] Written in 1882, and first published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, and entitled "My Dead." in the English collections it is usually given as "We cannot think of them as dead." 7. I little see, I little know. [Trust.] "A Psalm of Trust," written in 1883, first appeared in the Boston Christian Register, and again in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 8. Immortal by their deed and word. [The Spirit of Jesus.] Written in 1880, and first published in Unity Hymns and Carols, Chicago, Ill., 1880, and then in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 9. Many things in life there are. [Mystery in all Things.] Written in 1885, and first published in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title "Passing Understanding," and the quotation "The Peace of God which passeth all understanding." 10. Not always on the mount may we. [On the Mount.] This lesson from the Transfiguration was written in 1882, and published in the Chicago Unity, April 1, 1884. After revision by the author, it was included in the 1st Series of The Thought of God, 1885. 11. Not when, with self dissatisfied. [Lent.] Written in 1891, and given in The Thought of God, 2nd series, 1894, p. 33. It is in The Public School Hymn Book, 1903, and others. 12. O beautiful, my country. [National Hymn.] As “Our Country," written in 1884, and published in the Chicago Unity Festivals, 1884; and again in The Thought of God, 1885. 13. O Light, from age to age the same. [Dedication Anniversary.] Written in 1890 for the fiftieth anniversary of the Second Congregational Church (Unitarian), Quincy, 111. Included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, and entitled "From Generation to Generation." 14. O Lord of Life, where'er they be. [Life in God.] "Written in 1888 for Easter service in Author's own church," and first published in the Chicago Unit, and again in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. The "Alleluia!" refrain, which is added in some collections to each verse, is appended, in the original, to the last verse only. 15. O Name, all other names above. [Trust in God.] Under the title "Found. 'They that know Thy name will put their trust in Thee!’ this hymn, written in 1878, was given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. 16. O Prophet souls of all the years. [Unity.] “Written in 1893 for, and sung at, the Unitarian gathering in connection with The World's Parliament of Religions (World's Fair), Chicago, Sep., 1893," and included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, and entitled "One Law, One Life, one Love." 17. O Thou, in all Thy might so far. [God All in All.] This hymn, given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, with the title "The Mystery of God," was written in 1876, and first published in the New York Inquirer. 18. O thou in lonely vigil led. This encouragement for lonely workers was written for the "Emerson Commemoration, W. U. C, 1888," and included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 19. O Thou, Who art of all that is. [Divine Guidance.] Under the title "Through unknown paths," this hymn was included in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. It was written in 1877. 20. O Thou, Whose Spirit witness bears. [Dedication of a Place of Worship.] Written for the Dedication of First Unitarian Church, Omaha, Feb. 6, 1891, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, with the title "The Inward Witness," and the subscription "For T. K., Omaha, 1801." 21. On eyes that watch through sorrow's night. [Easter] A Carol for Easter Morn, written in 1890 for the author's congregation, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894. 22. One thought I have, my ample creed. [The Thought of God.] This is the initial hymn to the collection The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, and supplies the title to the work. It was written in 1880, and first published in the Chicago Unity Hymns and Carols, 1880, and then in The Thought of God, 1885. 23. The rose is queen among the flowers. [Flower Service.] "Written in 1875, first published in The Sunnyside, a song book for Sunday Schools, and again in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885, under the title "Flower Sunday." 24. Thy kingdom come, — on bended knee. [Missions.] "Written in 1891 for the Commencement of the Meadville Theological School (Meadville, Pa.), June 12, 1891, and published in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894," under the title "The Day of God," and the subscription, "M. T. S., June 12, 1891." 25. We pray no more, made lowly wise, For miracle and sign. [Greater Faith Desired.] Written in 1879, and first published in The Christian Register (Boston), Mar. 22 of that year, under the title 'The Larger Faith.'" Included under the same title in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. Sometimes given as "Made lowly wise, we pray no more." 26. When courage fails, and faith burns low. [Victory of Truth.] Under the title "Loyalty," this hymn was given in The Thought of God, 1st Series, 1885. It was written in 1881. 27. Where men on mounts of vision Have passed the veil within. [Dedication of a Place of Worship.] "Written in 1891 for the Dedication of First Unitarian Church, Oakland, California." Included in The Thought of God, 2nd Series, 1894, entitled "Holy Places," and subscribed " For C. W. W., Oakland, Cal., 1891." These annotations are from manuscript notes supplied to us by the author. Of these hymns all are in common use in America, and more than one half in Great Britain, mainly by Unitarians and Congregationalists. Amongst Unitarian hymn-writers of the last twenty years Mr. Hosmer is the most powerful and original known to us. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907)

Mary Nelson Keithahn

b. 1934 Meter: 8.8.8 with alleluias Author of "Good Friends, Rejoice, Be Glad and Sing" in The Song Lingers On Mary Nelson Keithahn, a retired United Church of Christ ordained pastor and church educator, has been a curriculum writer-editor, journalist, and lyricist for musical dramas and anthems. She still works out of her home in Rapid City, South Dakota, as a free-lance writer. In 2016 she published Elfie: Adventures on the Midwest Frontier, a chapter book for children, and Embracing the Light: Reflectioins on God’s Holy Word, a collection of meditations for individual or small group use. Augsburg Fortress also published Sing the Stories of God’s NEW People, the third in a trilogy of Bible story-based collections of songs for young children, written with her longtime colleague, John D. Horman. The two have written over a hundred hymns together, some of which are included in these hymnals and supplements: Community of Christ Sings, God’s Mission, God’s Song, Hymns of Heritage and Hope, Lift Up Your Hearts, Sing Justice! Do Justice, Sing the Faith, Singing Our Savior’s Story, Singing the New Testament, The Faith We Sing, Upper Room Worshipbook, Voices Found, Voices United, and Worship and Song. They have also published four collections of their hymns: Come Away with Me and Time Now to Gather (Abingdon, 1998), The Song Lingers On (Zimbel, 2003), and Faith That Lets Us Sing (Wayne Leupold Editions, 2017). Mary is a Life Member and former board member of Choristers Guild and a Life Member of the Hymn Society in the United States and Canada. She is also a member of ASCAP. In 2006 she received a Distinguished Achievement Award from her alma mater, Carleton College in Northfield, MN, in recognition of her work in composing text for religious music. Mary was married to the Rev. Richard K. Keithahn, a U.C.C. pastor, and widowed in 1986. She has three children, eight grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. --mnk

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