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E. W. Blandly

b. 1849 Person Name: Ernest W. Blandy Hymnal Number: 7388 Author of "Where He Leads Me" in The Cyber Hymnal Rv Ernest William Blandly (sometimes spelled Blandy) United Kingdom 1849-? He was a British minister that migrated to the USA in 1884 with his wife, Eliza. He became an officer in the Salvation Army and, in 1890, felt called to live in a Manhattan New York slum called “Hell's kitchen” with gangs and low life. He wrote several hymn lyrics. John Perry

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

1756 - 1791 Person Name: Wolfgang Mozart, 1756-1791 Hymnal Number: 3100 Composer (attributed to) of "ELLESDIE" in The Cyber Hymnal Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Austria 1756-1791. Born at Salzburg, Austria, the son of Leopold Mozart, a minor composer and violinist, and youngest of seven children, he showed amazing ability on violin and keyboard from earliest childhood, even starting to compose music at age four when his father would play a piece and Mozart would play it exactly as did his father. At five, he composed some of his own music, which he played to his father, who wrote it down. When Mozart was eight, he wrote his first symphony, probably transcribed by his father. In his early years his father was his only teacher, teaching his children languages and academic subjects, as well as fundamentals of their strict Catholic faith. Some of his early compositions came as a surprise to his father, who eventually gave up composing himself when he realized how talented his son was. His family made several European journeys and he and his sister, Nanneri, performed as child prodigies, at the court of Prince-elector Maximillian II of Bavaria in Munich, and at the Imperial Courts in Vienna and Prague. A long concert tour followed, for 3.5 years, taking the family to courts in Munich, Mannheim, Paris, London, Dover, The Hague, Amsterdam, Utrecht, Mechelen, and again to Paris, and back home via Zurich, Donaueschingen, and Munich. During these trips Mozart met many musicians, acquainting himself with the works of other composers. He met Johann Christian Bach in London in 1764. Family trips were challenging, and travel conditions were primitive. They had to wait for invitations and reimbursements from nobility, and they endured long, near-fatal illnesses far from home. First Leopold (1764) got sick, then both children (1765). They traveled again to Vienna in 1767 and stayed there over a year. After a year back in Salzburg, Leopold and Wolfgang went to Italy (1769-1771), Leopold wished to display his son’s abilities as a performer and maturing composer. In Bologna, Italy, Wolfgang was accepted as a member of the famous Academia Filamonica. In Rome he heard Gregorio Allegri’s Miserere twice in performance. Back in the Sistine Chapel, Mozart wrote the whole performance out from memory, thus producing the first unauthorized copy of this closely guarded property of the Vatican. In the next few years Mozart wrote several operas performed with success in Italy, but his father’s hopes of securing a professional appointment for his son were not realized. At age 17 he was engaged as a musician at the Salzburg court, but grew restless and traveled in search of a better position. After returning to Salzburg, Mozart was employed as a court musician by the ruler of Salzburg, Prince Archbishop Hieronymus Colloredo. This gave Mozart ample opportunity to develop relationships with other musicians and his admirers, resulting in his development of new symphonies, sonatas, string quartets, masses, serenades, and some minor operas. In 1775 he wrote his only violin concertos, five in all. Again, he was discontent with work in Salzburg and traveled to find more opportunity to write operas. He and his father again visited Munich and Vienna, but neither visit was successful with the exception of his opera ‘La finta giardiniera’ in Munich. In 1777 he resigned his Salzburg position and went to Augsburg, Mannheim, Paris, and Munich again. In Mannheim he met and fell in love with Aloysia Weber, one of four daughters of a musical family. He could find no real employment there and left for Paris in 1778. He might have had a position as organist at Versailles, but he was not interested in that. He fell into debt and started pawning valuables. During these events his mother died. Meanwhile his father was still trying to find him a position in Salzburg. After checking out several other European cities and Munich, he again encountered Aloysia, but she was no longer interested in him, so he returned to Salzburg, having written another symphony, concerto, and piano sonata, and took the new appointment his father had found. However, he was still in discontent. Visiting Vienna in 1781, he was dismissed from his Salzburg position. He wrote another opera, ‘Idomeneo’, in 1781, that was successful in Munich. Two months later he was summoned to Vienna, where his employer, Archbishop Colloredo, wanted him around due to his notoriety. Mozart wished to meet the emperor and perform for him, and finally got that opportunity. It resulted in a part-time position and substantial commissions. Colloredo became a nemesis to Mozart’s career, finally releasing Mozart from his employ with a literal kick in the pants, much against his father’s wishes. However, he was now independent. Mozart then decided to settle in Vienna as a free lance performer and composer. He lived with the Fridolin Weber family, who had moved from Mannheim to Vienna. Fridolin, the father, had died, and they were taking in lodgers to make ends meet. His career there went well, and he performed as a pianist before the Emperor, establishing himself as the finest keyboard player in Vienna. He wrote another opera in 1782, again achieving success. Mozart had now become a prolific and influential composer of the Classical period and was known throughout Europe. Aloysia was now married to actor, Joseph Lange, and Mozart’s interest shifted to her sister, Constanze. In 1782 he married Constanze Weber Mozart Nissen. The marriage started out with a brief separation, and there was a problem getting Mozart’s father’s permission, which finally came. They had six children, but only two survived infancy: Carl and Franz. He lived in Vienna and achieved some notoriety, composing many of his best-known symphonies, concertos, and operas. In 1782-83 he became intimately acquainted with Johann Sebastian Bach and George Friederic Handel, as his friend, Gottfried van Swieten, owned many manuscripts of the Baroque masters, which Mozart studied intently. He altered his style of composition as a result. That year Mozart and his wife visited his father and sister, and he composed a liturgical piece, a Mass, with a singing part for his wife. He also met Joseph Hadyn in Vienna in 1784 and they became friends. They even played together in a string quartet from time to time. Mozart wrote six quartets dedicated to Hadyn. In 1785 Hadyn told Leopold Mozart, “Your son is the greatest composer known to me by person and repute, he has taste, and what is more, the greatest skill in composition”. Over the next several years Mozart booked several piano concertos in various places as a sole performer to delighted audiences, making substantial remuneration for his work. He and his wife then adopted a more luxurious lifestyle. They moved to an expensive apartment and he bought a fine fortepiano and billiard table. They sent their son, Karl, to an expensive boarding school and also kept servants. In 1784 Mozart became a Freemason and even composed Masonic music. Over the next several years he did little operatic writing and focused on his career as a piano soloist and writer of concertos. He again began operatic collaboration in 1785, creating ‘The marriage of Figaro’, then ‘Don Giovanni’ in 1787. That year his father died. Also that year he obtained a steady post under Emperor Joseph II as his chamber composer. This was part-time employment that was important when hard times arrived. However, Joseph aimed at keeping Mozart from leaving Vienna for better work. The Austrio-Turkish War made life difficult for musicians, and his aristocracy support had declined. He moved to save on expenses, but that did not help much, and he was reduced to borrowing funds from his friends, and pleading for loans. During this period he produced his last three symphonies. In 1789 he then set up on a journey to Leipzig, Dresden, and Berlin hoping to improve his fortunes. In 1790 he was highly productive, producing concertos, an opera, ‘The magic flute’, a series of string quintets, a motet, and an (unfinished) Requiem. Finances began to improve and he begin paying back his debts. Public reaction to his works also brought him great satisfaction. In 1791, while in Prague for the premiere of his opera, ‘La clemenza di Tito’, he fell ill. He continued professional functions for a short time, but had to go home and be nursed by his wife over the next couple of months. He died at Vienna, Austria, at the age of 35, a small thin man with undistinguishing characteristics. He was buried in a modest grave, having had a small funeral. Beethoven composed his early works in the shadow of Mozart, and Joseph Hadyn wrote “posterity will not see such a talent (as Mozart) again in 100 years”. 600+ works. Side note: Mozart enjoyed billiards, dancing, and had a pet canary, a starling, a dog, and a horse for recreational riding. He liked off-color humor. He wore elegant clothing when performing and had a modest tenor voice. John Perry

George Duffield

1818 - 1888 Person Name: George Duffield, Jr. Hymnal Number: 660 Author of "Blessèd Savior, Thee I Love" in The Cyber Hymnal Duffield, George, Jr., D.D., son of the Rev. Dr. Duffield, a Presbyterian Minister, was born at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, Sept. 12, 1818, and graduated at Yale College, and at the Union Theological Seminary, New York. From 1840 to 1847 he was a Presbyterian Pastor at Brooklyn; 1847 to 1852, at Bloomfield, New Jersey; 1852 to 1861, at Philadelphia; 1861 to 1865, at Adrian, Michigan; 1865 to 1869, at Galesburg, Illinois; 1869, at Saginaw City, Michigan; and from 1869 at Ann Arbor and Lansing, Michigan. His hymns include;— 1. Blessed Saviour, Thee I love. Jesus only. One of four hymns contributed by him to Darius E. Jones's Temple Melodies, 1851. It is in 6 stanzas of 6 lines. In Dr. Hatfield's Church Hymnbook it is given in 3 stanzas. The remaining three hymns of the same date are:— 2. Parted for some anxious days. Family Hymn. 3. Praise to our heavenly Father, God. Family Union. 4. Slowly in sadness and in tears. Burial. 5. Stand up, stand up for Jesus. Soldiers of the Cross. The origin of this hymn is given in Lyra Sac. Americana, 1868, p. 298, as follows:— "I caught its inspiration from the dying words of that noble young clergyman, Rev. Dudley Atkins Tyng, rector of the Epiphany Church, Philadelphia, who died about 1854. His last words were, ‘Tell them to stand up for Jesus: now let us sing a hymn.' As he had been much persecuted in those pro-slavery days for his persistent course in pleading the cause of the oppressed, it was thought that these words had a peculiar significance in his mind; as if he had said, ‘Stand up for Jesus in the person of the downtrodden slave.' (Luke v. 18.)" Dr. Duffield gave it, in 1858, in manuscript to his Sunday School Superintendent, who published it on a small handbill for the children. In 1858 it was included in The Psalmist, in 6 stanzas of 8 lines. It was repeated in several collections and in Lyra Sac. Amer., 1868, from whence it passed, sometimes in an abbreviated form, into many English collections. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] - John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) See also in: Hymn Writers of the Church

Julia Ward Howe

1819 - 1910 Person Name: Julia Howe Hymnal Number: 374 Author of "Battle Hymn of the Republic" in The Cyber Hymnal Born: May 27, 1819, New York City. Died: October 17, 1910, Middletown, Rhode Island. Buried: Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Howe, Julia, née Ward, born in New York City in 1819, and married in 1843 the American philanthropist S. G. Howe. She has taken great interest in political matters, and is well known through her prose and poetical works. Of the latter there are Passion Flower, 1854; Words of the Hour, 1856; Later Lyrics, 1866; and From Sunset Ridge, 1896. Her Battle Hymn of the Republic, "eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord," was written in 1861 at the outbreak of the Civil War, and was called forth by the sight of troops for the seat of war, and published in her Later Lyrics, 1806, p. 41. It is found in several American collections, including The Pilgrim Hymnal, 1904, and others. [M. C. Hazard, Ph.D.] --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, New Supplement (1907) ============================ Howe, Julia Ward. (New York, New York, May 27, 1819--October 17, 1910). Married Samuel Gridley Howe on April 26, 1843. She was a woman with a distinguished personality and intellect; an abolitionist and active in social reforms; author of several book in prose and verse. The latter include Passion Flower, 1854; Words of the Hours, 1856; Later Lyrics, 1866; and From a Sunset Ridge, 1896. She became famous as the author of the poem entitled "Battle Hymn of the Republic," which, in spite of its title, was written as a patriotic song and not as a hymn for use in public worship, but which has been included in many American hymn books. It was written on November 19, 1861, while she and her husband, accompanied by their pastor, Rev. James Freeman Clarke, minister of the (Unitarian) Church of the Disciples, Boston, were visiting Washington soon after the outbreak of the Civil War. She had seen the troops gathered there and had heard them singing "John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the grave" to a popular tune called "Glory, Hallelujah" composed a few years earlier by William Steffe of Charleston, South Carolina, for Sunday School use. Dr. Clarke asked Julie Howe if she could not write more uplifting words for the tune and as she woke early the next morning she found the verses forming in her mind as fast as she could write them down, so completely that later she re-wrote only a line or two in the last stanza and changed only four words in other stanzas. She sent the poem to The Atlantic Monthly, which paid her $4 and published it in its issue for February, 1862. It attracted little attention until it caught the eye of Chaplain C. C. McCable (later a Methodist bishop) who had a fine singing voice and who taught it first to the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry regiment to which he was attached, then to other troops, and to prisoners in Libby Prison after he was made a prisoner of war. Thereafter it quickly came into use throughout the North as an expression of the patriotic emotion of the period. --Henry Wilder Foote, DNAH Archives

W. Chatterton Dix

1837 - 1898 Person Name: William C. Dix Hymnal Number: 252 Author of "Alleluia! Sing to Jesus!" in The Cyber Hymnal Most British hymn writers in the nineteenth century were clergymen, but William C. Dix (b. Bristol, England, 1837; d. Cheddar, Somerset, England, 1898) was a notable exception. Trained in the business world, he became the manager of a marine insurance company in Glasgow, Scotland. Dix published various volumes of his hymns, such as Hymns of Love and Joy (1861) and Altar Songs: Verses on the Holy Eucharist (1867). A number of his texts were first published in Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861). Bert Polman ======================== Dix, William Chatterton, son of John Dix, surgeon, of Bristol, author of the Life of Chatterton; Local Legends, &c, born at Bristol, June 14, 1837, and educated at the Grammar School of that city. Mr. Chatterton Dix's contributions to modern hymnody are numerous and of value. His fine Epiphany hymn, "As with gladness men of old,” and his plaintive ”Come unto Me, ye weary," are examples of his compositions, many of which rank high amongst modern hymns. In his Hymns of Love and Joy, 1861, Altar Songs, Verses on the Holy Eucharist, 1867; Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871; and Seekers of a City, 1878, some of his compositions were first published. The greater part, however, were contributed to Hymns Ancient & Modern; St. Raphaels Hymnbook, 1861; Lyra Eucharidica, 1863; Lyra Messianica, 1864; Lyra Mystica, 1865; The People's Hymns, 1867; The Hymnary, 1872; Church Hymns, 1871, and others. Many of his contributions are renderings in metrical form of Dr. Littledale's translation from the Greek in his Offices . . . of the Holy Eastern Church, 1863; and of the Rev. J. M. Rodwell's translation of hymns of the Abyssinian Church. These renderings of the "songs of other Churches" have not received the attention they deserve, and the sources from whence they come are practically unknown to most hymnal compilers. Mr. Dix has also written many Christmas and Easter carols, the most widely known of which is "The Manger Throne."   In addition to detached pieces in prose and verse for various magazines, he has published two devotional works, Light; and The Risen Life, 1883; and a book of instructions for children entitled The Pattern Life, 1885. The last-named contains original hymns by Mr. Dix not given elsewhere. In addition to the more important of Mr. Dix's hymns which are annotated under their respective first lines, the following are also in common use:- 1. God cometh, let the heart prepare.  Advent. In his Vision of All Saints, &c, 1871.      2. Holy, holy, holy, to Thee our vows we pay.  Holy Communion.   Published in his Altar Songs, 1867, in 6 stanzas of 6 lines, and headed "Eucharistic Processional for Dedication Feast."    In the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871, and others in an abridged form.      3. How long, O Lord, how long, we ask.   Second Advent.   Appeared in the Appendix to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Psalms & Hymns, 1869, and repeated in several collections.        4. In our work and in our play.    Children's Hymn. Published in his Hymns and Carols for Children, 1869, and is largely adopted  in  children's  hymnbooks, as  Mrs. Brock's Children's Hymnbook, 1881, and others.   Also in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871.      5.  In the hollow of Thine hand.   For Fair Weather. Appeared in the People's Hymns, 1867, and repeated in several others.      6.  Joy fills our inmost heart today.    Christmas. Printed in the Church Times, and  then on a Flysheet by Gr. J. Palmer, as the third of Four Joyful Hymns for Christmas, circa 1865. It is in the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Church Hymns, 1871, and other hymnals. It is also one of Mr. Dix's Christmas Customs & Christmas Carols, not dated.      7. Lift up your songs, ye thankful.   St. Ambrose. Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.  8. Now in numbers softly flowing.    St. Cecilia. Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.    9.  Now, our Father, we adore Thee.   Praise to the Father.   Appeared in the Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns, 1869.   10.  O Christ, Thou Son of Mary.   St. Crispin.   First printed in the Union Review, Sept., 1866, and thence into the People's Hymns, 1887.   11. O Cross which only canst allay.   Glorying and Trusting in the Cross.   Published in the People's Hymns, 1867.   12. O Thou the Eternal Son of God.   Good Friday. Appeared in Lyra Messianica, 1864; the author's Hymns and Carols for Children, 1869; the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns, 1871, &c.   13. On the waters dark and drear.   For use at Sea. Published in Hymns for Public Worship, &c. (St. Raphael's, Bristol), 1861; the S. P. C. K. Church Hymns, 1871, &c.   14. Only one prayer to-day.   Ash Wednesday.   Contributed to the People's Hymns, 1867.   15. Sitting at receipt of custom.  St. Matthew.  Appeared in the People's Hymns, 1867.   16. The Cross is on thy brow.   Confirmation.   In the 1869 Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns.   17.  The stars above our head.   Work and Humility. In the 1869 Appendix to the S. P. C. K. Psalms & Hymns.  18. When the shades of night are falling.   Evening Hymn to the Good Shepherd.   In the author's Seekers of a City, &c. [1878]. Most of Mr. Dix's best-known hymns, and also some of those named above, are in common use in America and other English-speaking countries. In Great Britain and America from 30 to 40 are in common use.  He died Sept. 9, 1898. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ====================== Dix, William Chatterton, p. 302, ii. Additional hymns by Mr. Dix now in common use are:— 1. Lift up your songs, ye angel choirs. Ascension. 2. Now, my soul rehearse the story. Christ Feeding the Multitude. 3. Within the temple's hallowed courts. Blessed Virgin Mary. These hymns are from his Altar Songs, 1867. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

D. S. Warner

1842 - 1895 Person Name: Daniel Sidney Warner, 1842-1895 Hymnal Number: 2856 Author of "I Know My Name is There" in The Cyber Hymnal Warner, Daniel Sidney. (near Marshallville, Wayne County, Ohio, 1842--1895). Church of God. Reared on an Ohio farm. During the Civil War, he substituted for a brother. Later he taught school. He attended Oberlin College briefly in 1865. By 1867 he was licensed to preach by the Western Ohio Eldership of the Church of God (Winebrennerian). His experience in preaching was gained on circuits in Nebraska and Ohio. In 1874 he was in trouble with the Eldership for preaching entire sanctification. Soon he joined the Indiana Eldership. In 1881 he was in trouble with this Eldership over sectism. Warner was an associate editor of the Herals of Gospel Freedom in 1878. this paper was merged with the Pilgrim about 1881, and the new paper was called the Gospel Trumpet, with Warner as its editor. Warner was forced to move the paper about, seeing for firm financial foundations. The publishing work was at last established in Grand Junction, Michigan, enabling Warner to travel more extensively with a group of evangelists. Warner's time was spent in editing the Trumpet, writing books, tracts, and songs, and making evangelistic tours of the United States. --John W.V. Smith, DNAH Archives =================================== Daniel Sidney Warner, 1842-1895 Born: June 25, 1842, Bris­tol (now Mar­shall­ville), Ohio. Died: De­cem­ber 12, 1895, Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, of pneu­mon­ia. Buried: Near Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan, at the edge of the Church of God camp­ground that was once there. As of 1880, Warner was liv­ing in Rome Ci­ty, In­di­a­na. His works in­clude: Echoes From Glo­ry, with Bar­ney War­ren (Grand Junc­tion, Mi­chi­gan: The Gos­pel Trump­et Pub­lish­ing Com­pa­ny, 1893) Lyrics-- Ah Poor Ali­en Far from the Fold of Love Ah Poor Sin­ner, Think of Cal­va­ry All This World, Its Wealth and Hon­or All Ye People, Come Down to the Judg­ment Be­gun Along a Dark and Gloomy Path Are You of the Holy Rem­nant Are You Rea­dy, Wait­ing for the Lord? Are You Sow­ing Seeds of Kind­ness? Asleep in Je­sus, Oh, How Sweet A Gentle Hand Un­seen by Us A Long Time I Wan­dered Away Beautiful, Peace­ful Zi­on Behold a Form upon the Lone­ly Mount Behold, What Love, What Bound­less Love Bond of Per­fect­ness, The Borne Away in Mind and Spir­it Brighter Days Are Sweet­ly Dawn­ing By Thy Blessed Word Obey­ing Can the Spir­it of a Mor­tal Church of God, Thou Spot­less Vir­gin Church of the Liv­ing God Come, Be­hold the Love of Je­sus Come unto Me, All Ye That La­bor Come, With­in That Upper Cham­ber Dear Friends, We Have Pre­cious Tidings of Old Don’t Re­sist the Ho­ly Spirit Down into the Flow­ing Ri­ver Do You Tr­iumph, O My Bro­ther? Ere Christ Will Reign Within Thy Heart Fair C­ity of the Gos­pel Day Far Down o’er the Ag­es a Prom­ise Di­vine Fill Me with Thy Spir­it From My Soul and All With­in From the Mount of Heav­en­ly Vi­sion God Is Sit­ting in the Aw­ful Val­ley God Is Sweep­ing through the Na­tions God of Mer­cy, God of Love Great Peace Have They That Love Thy Law Hallelujah to Je­sus! Hark, in the Bi­ble a Warn­ing Hear the Tid­ings of a King­dom Hear the Voice of Our Com­mand­er Hear Ye the Moan of a Soul That Is Lost Here We Meet and Part in Je­sus His Yoke Is Ea­sy How Often I’ve Pondered My Struggles Within How Sweet Is My Walk with Je­sus! How Sweet This Bond of Per­fect­ness I Am Rest­ing in Je­sus, Hal­le­lu­jah! I Know My Name Is There I Heard the Dear Re­deem­er Say I Lost My Life for Je­sus on the Cross I Ought to Love My Sav­ior I Seem to Hear an An­gel Choir I Will Be with Thee, O, Child of Love I Will Part with Thee, Old Mas­ter I Will Trust Thee, O My Fa­ther If Thou Wilt Know the Foun­tain Deep I’ll Sing of a Ri­ver Di­vine In the Cham­bers of Thy Bo­som In the Light of God In the Morn­ing of the Lord Is the Spirit Glow­ing in Thy Heart? It Is Writ­ten in the Bi­ble I’ve Found a Friend in Je­sus I’ve Found My Lord and He Is Mine I’ve Reached the Land of Pure De­light Jesus Drank the Cup of Sor­row Jesus Has Taken My Load of Sin Jesus, Thou a Fount­ain Art Last Great Day, The Let Us Sing an In­vi­ta­tion Let Us Sing a Sweet Song of the Home of the Soul Let Us Sing the Name of Je­sus Life Is Not a Mys­tic Dream Light in Our Dark­ness, Bro­ther Lord Our Shep­herd, The Listen, Sin­ner, to the Voice Lord, the Shades of Night Lo, Heav­en Now Opens to Rap­tur­ous View Lo the King­dom of Hea­ven We See Lo, wisdom Crieth in the Streets Mansion Is Wai­ting in Glo­ry, A Men Speak of a Church Tri­umph­ant Mighty Mes­sen­gers Are Run­ning My Je­sus Died for Me up­on the Cross My Name Is in the Book of Life My Soul in Trou­ble Roamed My Soul Is Sa­tis­fied My Soul Is Saved from Sin Not in the Tem­ples Made with Hands Now My Pil­grim toils Are Over Now the Great King of Ba­bel O Blessed Je­sus, for Thee W Are Wait­ing O Blessed Je­sus, Thy Love Is Su­preme O Careless Sin­ner, Wake to Mer­cy’s Call O God, In­spire Our Morn­ing Hymn O How Can Any­one Re­fuse O How Sublime Is the Life of the Christ­ian O Let Us Sing the Mighty Love O Love Di­vine, Un­fa­thomed! O Praise the Lord, My Soul Is Saved O Precious Bi­ble! Burn­ing Words from Hea­ven O Sin­ner, Come Home to the Sav­ior O W Love the Child­ren’s Mee­ting O What Deep and Pure Com­pas­sion O Wor­ship God, the Fa­ther O Ye Pil­grims, Sing an Ex­hor­ta­tion O’er the Door of Hea­ven’s King­dom Oft My Heart Has Bled with Sor­row Oh, Wor­ship God the Fa­ther, Just and True Oh, Come and Praise the Lord To­day Oh, When We Re­mem­ber the Good­ness O Who Can Stand the Judg­ment Day Oh, Why Should I Be Lost Onward Moves the Great Eter­nal Our God Is Love, the An­gels Know Perishing Souls at Stake Tod­ay! Pilgrim of Je­sus, o’er Life’s Trou­bled Sea Praise the Lord with Songs of Glo­ry Rejoice, Little Ones, in the Pro­mise Di­vine River of Peace Salvation Is the Sweet­est Thing See the Great King of Ba­bel Shall I Tell You Why I Ceased from Fol­ly? Shall My Soul As­cend with Rap­ture Shield of Faith, The Since I Have Found My Sa­vior Sing of Salvation, O, it Was Love Sinner, will You Lose Your Soul Sunbeams Spark­ling and Glanc­ing Sweet Fellowship, Thy Crys­tal Tide Sweetly Whis­pered the Lord in My Mind Take the Shield of Faith, My Bro­ther Tell Me, Pil­grim, Traveling Home­ward Tell Me, Watch­man, Oh, What of the Morn­ing There Are Some Rays of Hope Di­vine There Are Tidings of a Land Far Away There Is a Blest Pa­vil­ion There Is a Grace Few Mor­tals Find There Is a Story I Oft­en Must Pon­der There Is Joy in the Ser­vice of the Mas­ter There Was a Bright and Love­ly Boy There’s an An­gel of Mer­cy from Hea­ven There’s a Fact No Mortal Ever Can Deny There’s a Fount­ain of Blood That Atones for the Soul There’s a Land of Ev­er­last­ing Song There’s a Peace­ful Valley of De­ci­sion Found There’s a Song We Love to Sing There’s an Awful Day That’s Com­ing There’s Mercy, Poor Sin­ner, for Thee There’s Mu­sic in My Soul This Is Why I Love My Sav­ior Tho’ All Along My Hap­py Pil­grim Race Time Enough, the Slug­gard Cries Time On­ward Flows Like a R­iver Vast Trusting in Je­sus, My Sa­vior and Friend ’Twas Sung by the Po­ets Two Little Hands Are Sweet­ly Fold­ed Unheeding Win­ter’s Cru­el Blast Un­i­verse Is God’s Do­main, The We Are Com­ing, Hal­le­lu­jah! We Are Going Home to Hea­ven’s Gold­en City We Are the Hap­py Child­ren We Have Met To­day on the Old Camp­ground We Have Reached an Aw­ful Era We Have Read in Sac­red Sto­ry We Stand upon the Sea of Glass We Tread up­on the Aw­ful Verge We Will Work for Je­sus We’ll Fol­low the Lord All the Way We’re a Hap­py Christ­ian Band What Awful Dark­ness Shrouds All the Earth! When Lost in the Dark­ness of Guilt and Despair When We Pass the Gold­en Sum­mer Where Art Thou, Wan­d’ring Sin­ner? Where Shall We Look for Help in Af­flict­ion? While Sleep­ing Care­less on the Brink Whiter Than Snow Who but the Christ­ian Is Hap­py and Free? Who Can Sing the Won­drous Love of the Son Di­vine?? Who Is My Life but Christ Alone? Who Will Suf­fer with the Sav­ior? Why Should a Doubt or Fear Arise? Why Should a Mor­tal Man Com­plain? Wonderful Fount­ain of Glo­ry --hymntime.com/tch

Caroline M. Noel

1817 - 1877 Hymnal Number: 300 Author of "At the Name of Jesus" in The Cyber Hymnal Caroline Marie Noel (b. Teston, Kent, England, 1817; d. St. Marylebone, London, England, 1877) The daughter of an Anglican clergyman and hymn writer, she began to write poetry in her late teens but then abandoned it until she was in her forties. During those years she suffered frequent bouts of illness and eventually became an invalid. To encourage both herself and others who were ill or incapacitated, Noel began to write devotional verse again. Her poems were collected in The Name of Jesus and Other Verses for the Sick and Lonely (1861, enlarged in 1870). Bert Polman ================ Noel, Caroline Maria, daughter of the Hon. Gerard T. Noel (p. 809, ii.), and niece of the Hon. Baptist W. Noel, was born in London, April 10, 1817, and died at 39 Great Cumberland Place, Hyde Park, Dec. 7, 1877. Her first hymn, "Draw nigh unto my soul" (Indwelling), was written when she was 17. During the next three years she wrote about a dozen pieces: from 20 years of age to 40 she wrote nothing; and during the next 20 years the rest of her pieces were written. The first edition of her compositions was published as The Name of Jesus and Other Verses for the Sick and Lonely, in 1861. This was enlarged from time to time, and its title subsequently changed by the publishers to The Name of Jesus and Other Poems. The 1878 ed. contains 78 pieces. Miss Noel, in common with Miss Charlotte Elliott, was a great sufferer, and many of these verses were the outcome of her days of pain. They are specially adapted "for the Sick and Lonely" and were written rather for private meditation than for public use, although several are suited to the latter purpose. Her best known hymn is the Processional for Ascension Day, "At the Name of Jesus." It is in the enlarged edition of The Name of Jesus, &c, 1870, p. 59, and is dated 1870 by her family. --John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Henry Alford

1810 - 1871 Hymnal Number: 1025 Author of "Come, Ye Thankful People, Come" in The Cyber Hymnal Alford, Henry, D.D., son of  the Rev. Henry Alford, Rector of Aston Sandford, b. at 25 Alfred Place, Bedford Row, London, Oct. 7, 1810, and educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, graduating in honours, in 1832. In 1833 he was ordained to the Curacy of Ampton. Subsequently he held the Vicarage of Wymeswold, 1835-1853,--the Incumbency of Quebec Chapel, London, 1853-1857; and the Deanery of Canterbury, 1857 to his death, which took. place  at  Canterbury, Jan. 12, 1871.  In addition he held several important appointments, including that of a Fellow of Trinity, and the Hulsean Lectureship, 1841-2. His literary labours extended to every department of literature, but his noblest undertaking was his edition of the Greek Testament, the result of 20 years' labour.    His hymnological and poetical works, given below, were numerous, and included the compiling of collections, the composition of original hymns, and translations from other languages.    As a hymn-writer he added little to his literary reputation. The rhythm of his hymns is musical, but the poetry is neither striking, nor the thought original.   They are evangelical in their teaching,   but somewhat cold  and  conventional. They vary greatly in merit, the most popular being "Come, ye thankful  people, come," "In token that thou  shalt  not fear," and "Forward be our watchword." His collections, the Psalms and Hymns of 1844, and the Year of Praise, 1867, have not achieved a marked success.  His poetical and hymnological works include— (1) Hymns in the Christian Observer and the Christian Guardian, 1830. (2) Poems and Poetical Fragments (no name), Cambridge, J.   J.  Deighton, 1833.  (3) The School of the Heart, and other Poems, Cambridge, Pitt Press, 1835. (4) Hymns for the Sundays and Festivals throughout the Year, &c.,Lond., Longman ft Co., 1836. (5) Psalms and Hymns, adapted for the Sundays and Holidays throughout the year, &c, Lond., Rivington, 1844. (6) Poetical Works, 2 vols., Lond., Rivington, 1845. (7) Select Poetical Works, London, Rivington, 1851. (8) An American ed. of his Poems, Boston, Ticknor, Reed & Field, 1853(9) Passing away, and Life's Answer, poems in Macmillan's Magazine, 1863. (10) Evening Hexameters, in Good Words, 1864. (11) On Church Hymn Books, in the Contemporary Review, 1866. (12) Year of Praise, London, A. Strahan, 1867. (13) Poetical Works, 1868. (14) The Lord's Prayer, 1869. (15) Prose Hymns, 1844. (16) Abbot of Muchelnaye, 1841. (17) Hymns in British Magazine, 1832.   (18) A translation of Cantemus cuncti, q.v. -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907) ================== Alford, Henry, p. 39, ii. The following additional hymns by Dean Alford are in common use:— 1. Herald in the wilderness. St. John Baptist. (1867.) 2. Let the Church of God rejoice. SS. Simon and Jude. (1844, but not in his Psalms & Hymns of that year.) 3. Not in anything we do. Sexagesima. (1867.) 4. O Thou at Whose divine command. Sexagesima. (1844.) 5. 0 why on death so bent? Lent. (1867.) 6. Of all the honours man may wear. St. Andrew's Day. (1867.) 7. Our year of grace is wearing to a close. Close of the Year. (1867.) 8. Saviour, Thy Father's promise send. Whit-sunday. (1844.) 9. Since we kept the Saviour's birth. 1st Sunday after Trinity. (1867.) 10. Thou that art the Father's Word. Epiphany. (1844.) 11. Thou who on that wondrous journey. Quinquagesima. (1867.) 12. Through Israel's coasts in times of old. 2nd Sunday after Epiphany. (1867.) 13. Thy blood, O Christ, hath made our peace. Circumcision . (1814.) 14. When in the Lord Jehovah's name. For Sunday Schools. (1844.) All these hymns are in Dean Alford's Year of Praise, 1867, and the dates are those of their earliest publication, so far as we have been able to trace the same. --Excerpts from John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Charles William Everest

1814 - 1877 Person Name: Charles W. Everest Hymnal Number: 6474 Author of "Take Up Thy Cross (Everest)" in The Cyber Hymnal Everest, Charles William, M.A., born at East Windsor, Connecticut, May 27, 1814, graduated at Trinity College, Hartford, 1838, and took Holy Orders in 1842. He was rector at Hamden, Connecticut, from 1842 to 1873, and also agent for the Society for the Increase of the Ministry. He died at Waterbury, Connecticut, Jan. 11, 1877 (See Poets of Connecticut, 1843). In 1833 he published Visions of Death, and Other Poems; from this work his popular hymn is taken:— Take up thy cross, the Saviour said. Following Jesus. The original text of this hymn differs very materially from that which is usually found in the hymn-books. The most widely known form of the text is that in Hymns Ancient & Modern, where it appeared in 1861. It was copied by the Compilers from another collection, but by whom the alterations were made is unknown. The nearest approach to the original is in Horder's Congregational Hymn Book, 1884. Original text in Biggs's English Hymnology, 1873, p. 24. [Rev. F. M. Bird, M.A.] -- John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology (1907)

Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy

1809 - 1847 Person Name: Felix Mendelssohn Hymnal Number: 2384 Composer of "MENDELSSOHN" in The Cyber Hymnal Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy (b. Hamburg, Germany, 1809; d. Leipzig, Germany, 1847) was the son of banker Abraham Mendelssohn and the grandson of philosopher Moses Mendelssohn. His Jewish family became Christian and took the Bartholdy name (name of the estate of Mendelssohn's uncle) when baptized into the Lutheran church. The children all received an excellent musical education. Mendelssohn had his first public performance at the age of nine and by the age of sixteen had written several symphonies. Profoundly influenced by J. S. Bach's music, he conducted a performance of the St. Matthew Passion in 1829 (at age 20!) – the first performance since Bach's death, thus reintroducing Bach to the world. Mendelssohn organized the Domchor in Berlin and founded the Leipzig Conservatory of Music in 1843. Traveling widely, he not only became familiar with various styles of music but also became well known himself in countries other than Germany, especially in England. He left a rich treasury of music: organ and piano works, overtures and incidental music, oratorios (including St. Paul or Elijah and choral works, and symphonies. He harmonized a number of hymn tunes himself, but hymnbook editors also arranged some of his other tunes into hymn tunes. Bert Polman

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