Johann Gaudenz von Salis-Seewis

Johann Gaudenz von Salis-Seewis
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Short Name: Johann Gaudenz von Salis-Seewis
Full Name: Salis-Seewis, Johann Gaudenz von, 1762-1834
Birth Year: 1762
Death Year: 1834

Salis-Seewis, Johann Gaudenz, Baron von, was born Dec. 26, 1762, at the castle of Bodmer (Bothmar), near Malans, Grisons, Switzerland. From 1779 to 1792 he was an officer in the French army; and after 1798 he held various offices connected with the Swiss Militia, and with his native canton. He died at Bodmer, Jan. 29, 1834, and was buried at Seewis, near Malans (Allg. Deutsche Biog., xxx., 245, &c). His Poems appeared as his Gedichte at Zurich, 1793; 2nd ed., 1794; 3rd, 1797; 4th, 1800; 4th enlarged ed., 1803; new ed., 1808 [all in Berlin Library], and many later eds. The most famous of his poems is "Das Grab ist tief und stille" (in his Gedichte, 1793, p. 35, entitled "The Grave, 1783"), of which there are at least 7 translations into English. The only one in English common use as a hymn is:—
Ins stille Land! Wer leitet uns hinüber. For the Dying. 1st published in his Gedichte, Neue Auflage, Zürich, 1808, p. 146, in 3 stanzas of 7 lines, each ending "Ins stille Land." In his Gedichte, Cologne, 1815, p. 134. The translation in common use is:—
Into the Silent Land! Ah! who shall lead us thither. In full by H. W. Longfellow in his Voices of the Night, Cambridge, U. S., 1840, p. 141, repeated in the later eds. of his Poetical Works. Included in Hedge and Huntington's Hymnsfor the Church of Christ, 1853, and many later American collections. It has been retranslated into Greek verse by Dr. B. H. Kennedy, in his Between Whiles, 1877. There are at least three other versions in English. [Rev. James Mearns, M.A.]

--John Julian, Dictionary of Hymnology, Appendix, Part II (1907)

Wikipedia Biography

Johann Gaudenz Gubert Graf (and Freiherr) von Salis-Seewis (born 26 December 1762, Malans; died 29 January 1834, Malans) was a Swiss poet, writer, politician and librettist.

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