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George Kirbye

Short Name: George Kirbye
Full Name: Kirbye, George, ca. 1565-1634
Birth Year (est.): 1565
Death Year: 1634

George Kirbye (c. 1565 – buried October 6, 1634) was an English composer of the late Tudor period and early Jacobean era. He was one of the members of the English Madrigal School, but also composed sacred music.

Little is known of the details of his life, though some of his contacts can be inferred. He worked at Rushbrooke Hall near Bury St Edmunds, evidently as a tutor to the daughters of Sir Robert Jermyn. In 1598 he married Anne Saxye, afterwards moving to Bury St Edmunds. Around this time he probably made the acquaintance of John Wilbye, a much more famous madrigalist, who lived and worked only a few miles away, and whose style he sometimes approaches. In 1626 his wife died, and he is known to have been a churchwarden during the next several years until his death.

Kirbye's most significant musical contributions were the psalm settings he wrote for East's psalter in 1592, the madrigals he wrote for the Triumphs of Oriana (1601), the famous collection dedicated to Elizabeth I, and an independent set of madrigals published in 1597. Stylistically his madrigals have more in common with the Italian models provided by Marenzio than do many of the others by his countrymen: they tend to be serious, in a minor mode, and show a careful attention to text setting; unlike Marenzio, however, he is restrained in his specific imagery.

Kirbye avoided the light style of Morley, which was hugely popular, and brought into the madrigal serious style of pre-madrigal English music. He is not as often sung as Morley, Weelkes or Wilbye, but neither was he as prolific; still, some of his madrigals appear in modern collections.

--en.wikipedia.org/wiki/


Tunes by George Kirbye (3)sort descendingAsInstancesIncipit
COLESHILLKirby (Composer)211737 11535 437
WINCHESTER OLDGeorge Kirbye (Tenor-lead arrangement)3513321 44323 55453
WINDSOR (Tye)George Kirbye (Composer)1511232 11735 43233
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